Cases reported "Exostoses"

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1/6. popliteal artery thrombosis secondary to exostosis of the tibia.

    This report describes an exceptional case of popliteal artery thrombosis secondary to exostosis of the superior extremity of the superior tibia in a young adult. Correct diagnosis was made during re-operation for recurrent thrombosis. Surgical treatment consisted of resection of the bony tumor and venous bypass to reestablish arterial continuity. Femoropopliteal vascular complications of exostosis are rare, with most cases involving arterial aneurysms or false aneurysms. Differential diagnosis in our young patient took into account the other causes of popliteal thrombosis: entrapped popliteal artery, adventitious cyst, fibrodysplasia, and juvenile arteriopathy. In patients with major functional disability, operative treatment is recommended to remove the bony abnormality and repair the arterial lesion.
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2/6. Disproportionate short stature, type E brachydactyly and exostoses of tibiae in a patient with an xyy karyotype. A 'new' syndrome?

    An 18-year-old male with an xyy karyotype is reported with short stature, normal intelligence and normal personality, in contrast to the XYY syndrome which can be characterized by tall stature, mental subnormality and aggressive behaviour. The patient, in addition, had exostoses of the tibiae bilaterally and type E brachydactyly; this association has not previously been described in patients with the xyy karyotype.
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3/6. Talotibial exostoses with entrapment of the deep peroneal nerve.

    An athlete with talotibial exostoses with entrapment of the deep peroneal nerve is presented. This diagnosis was made by history, physical and roentgenographic examinations, bone scan, and isokinetic exercising. Treatment of this condition involved surgical excision of the boney exostoses.
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4/6. Impingement exostoses of the talus and fibula secondary to an inversion sprain. A case report.

    Impingement exostoses of the talus and fibula following an inversion sprain is an uncommon sequela to the initial injury. Although a high frequency of symptomatic tibial and talar impingement exostoses have been reported, changes on the lateral side of the ankle are more subtle with significant roentgenographic findings rarely seen. The authors present a rare case of impingement exostoses involving both the talus and fibula simultaneously. arthroscopy visualized the tibiotalar and talomalleolar articulations. It revealed opposing exostoses of the talus and fibula, necessitating surgical resection. arthroscopy is recommended for difficult diagnostic problems of the ankle and an awareness of the condition of post-traumatic impingement exostoses of the talus and fibula.
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keywords = tibia
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5/6. Marked bone spur formation in a burn amputee patient.

    This report presents an unusual case of a lower extremity burn amputee with a marked degree of bone spur formation. A 17-year-old man suffered 56% body surface area mixed-depth electrical and flame burns, necessitating left below knee amputation. He was admitted to a rehabilitation center 3 months postinjury for pylon fitting and gait training. Difficulty was encountered with poor skin tolerance to weight bearing because of the prominent distal bony margins in the stump. x-rays of the stump revealed a marked degree of linear bone spur formation, extending longitudinally from the distal tibia and fibula with multiple cross-bridges. The spur formation was considered an extensive bony exostosis of unclear etiology. Surgical revision was elected to obtain a stump more suitable for prosthetic tolerance, and to avoid a bulky "bypass" prosthesis. This stump revision enabled the patient to attain independent functional prosthetic ambulation. Although there is evidence of some recurrence of bone spur formation, this remains limited and asymptomatic.
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keywords = tibia
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6/6. The disappearing exostosis? A report of an unusual case.

    A girl aged 11 years was referred to us with a medial upper right tibial exostosis. As the lesion was asymptomatic, surgery was not undertaken. The patient defaulted from follow up, and, when reviewed 32 months later, there was no clinical or radiographic evidence of the exostosis. Spontaneous involution of an exostosis may occasionally occur in childhood.
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