Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/7. Distant and delayed mitomycin C extravasation.

    mitomycin C is a vesicant chemotherapeutic agent used to treat solid tumors. Its ability to cause delayed and remote tissue injury after intravenous administration is reported in the literature. Two cases of delayed and distant mitomycin C extravasation injury occurred in our institution. In both patients, no evidence of acute extravasation was visible during or immediately after administration. Within 48 hours, one patient reported erythema, burning, and pain in the hand contralateral to the administration site. The second patient developed three distinct ulcerated lesions on her forearm within 6 weeks of receiving the agent. The lesions, located at sites of venipunctures, occurred 12-15 cm proximal to the site of mitomycin infusion. Because the drug has the potential to cause such unusual and unanticipated tissue injuries, health care professionals and patients should be aware of this hazard.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/7. Postural headache and cerebrospinal fluid leak: believing is seeing.

    A 33-year-old woman developed persistent postural headache following epidural anesthesia (L2-L3 level). iohexol myelography (L5-S1 puncture) demonstrated no epidural extravasation of contrast material (Figure A), but subsequent computed tomography (CT) axial images (B, C) revealed leakage of dye through the needle track of the L5-S1 puncture (arrows). No leakage of contrast medium was found at the site of the L2-L3 epidural puncture.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/7. Accidental small-bowel puncture, and importance of patient positioning, during isotopic peritoneography: a case report.

    A 47-y-old woman with chronic liver disease, who had previously undergone placement of a peritoneal venous shunt without ascites, presented with a chronic right pleural effusion. The first attempt at radionuclide injection resulted in an accidental small-bowel injection with consequent intraalimentarily induced nuclear small-bowel followthrough. I have not read of this interesting complication in the literature. She did not have a bowel obstruction. A repeated study 2 d later demonstrated an obstructed peritoneal shunt and right hemidiaphragmatic pleural leak best seen with the patient upright.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/7. Recovery of intralipid from lumbar puncture after migration of saphenous vein catheter.

    A term female infant was admitted to the intensive care unit with the diagnosis of tetralogy of fallot with critical pulmonary stenosis. On the seventh day of life a long saphenous line was inserted that remained without complications until seven days later when the infant appeared septic. A lumbar puncture demonstrated the presence of intra-lipid in the cerebrospinal fluid that we interpreted as due to migration of the saphenous catheter. The child had an uneventful recovery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/7. Internal mammary artery injury following subclavian vein catheterization.

    Inappropriate puncture of the internal mammary artery caused by subclavian vein puncture is a rare but potentially lethal complication. We report a case of 45-year-old woman with internal mammary artery injury following subclavian vein catheterization successfully treated by transcatheter arterial embolization using coils.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/7. An injection from the past: fluoroscopic evidence of remote injections of radiopaque substances.

    OBJECTIVE: Although uncommon, residual effects from contrast agents used more than 2 decades ago are possible. This case report is to alert clinicians to the implications of residual oil-based ionic contrast agents in the intrathecal space. CASE REPORT: A 70-year-old female with evidence of degenerative disc disease underwent a series of lumbar epidural steroid injections. fluoroscopy during the procedure revealed diffuse residual intrathecal iophendylate (Pantopaque) dye. We were able to demonstrate unrestricted epidural spread of 1 mL iohexol (Omnipaque 180) alongside the preexisting dye. CONCLUSIONS: The goal of this case report is to highlight the potential of residual myelographic dye to complicate interventional procedures. Such residual dye can increase the level of difficulty in performing interventional pain treatments and perhaps the rate of complications associated with epidural injections, such as dural puncture. The presence of large amounts of residual oil-based intrathecal dye can lead to erroneous interpretations of the dye patterns as intraspinal lipoma or hemorrhage. As a consequence, the patient can be submitted to unnecessary diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. In addition, concerns of worsening oil-based dye-induced arachnoiditis with the use of epidural steroid injections can complicate the treatment of patients with back pain.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/7. Transurethral prostatectomy complicated by intraperitoneal extravasation of irrigating fluid.

    A patient underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), which was complicated at the outset of the procedure by an inadvertent puncture wound of the dome of the bladder and the peritoneum. Shortly after resection was initiated, the patient developed shoulder pain and a tensely distended abdomen, although at this time the serum sodium concentration remained normal. Over the next several hours the patient developed significant hyponatremia. The prolonged and gradual time course of this development suggests that fluid and electrolyte shifts occurred via diffusion across the peritoneal membrane. This case illustrates a rare but potentially dangerous complication of TURP that requires recognition prior to initiation of appropriate therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)



We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.