Cases reported "Eye Diseases"

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1/131. Primary ocular Epstein-Barr virus-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in a patient with AIDS: a clinicopathologic report.

    OBJECTIVE: To report an unusual case of chronic multifocal chorioretinitis with vitritis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) that was resistant to antiviral and antitoxoplasmic medication and required a retinal biopsy for definitive diagnosis. methods: Vitreous biopsy, pars plana vitrectomy, and retinal biopsy were performed. The vitreous biopsy material was sent for bacterial, fungal, and viral culture, and the vitreous cassette was sent for cytology. The retinal biopsy material was divided and sent for polymerase chain reaction testing for toxoplasmosis and virology and pathologic tissue analysis. RESULTS: Vitreous cytology showed a mixed population of lymphocytes and histiocytes, but all other microbiologic and virologic studies were negative. Tissue analysis revealed an infiltrate of atypical mononuclear cells extending from the inner limiting membrane through the outer plexiform layer characteristic of a B cell, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the central nervous system (NHL-CNS). in situ hybridization for the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was positive. An extensive systemic evaluation did not show evidence of extraocular tumor. CONCLUSION: Although rare, primary ocular NHL-CNS can be seen in patients with AIDS, and its clinical presentation often closely resembles other disorders. To our knowledge, this case represents the first ocular NHL in which EBV is shown to be associated.
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ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
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2/131. diplopia secondary to aniseikonia associated with macular disease.

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an explanation for diplopia and the inability to fuse in some patients with macular disease. methods: We identified 7 patients from our practices who had binocular diplopia concurrent with epiretinal membranes or vitreomacular traction. A review of the medical records of all patients was performed. In addition to complete ophthalmologic and orthoptic examinations, evaluation of aniseikonia using the Awaya New aniseikonia Tests (Handaya Co Ltd, tokyo, japan) was performed on all patients. RESULTS: All patients were referred for troublesome diplopia. Six of the patients had epiretinal membranes and 1 had vitreomacular traction. All 7 patients had aniseikonia, ranging from 5% to 18%. In 5 of the patients the image in the involved eye was larger, and in the other 2 patients it was smaller than in the fellow eye. All patients had concomitant small-angle strabismus and at least initially did not fuse when the deviation was offset with a prism. Response to optical management and retinal surgery was variable. CONCLUSIONS: aniseikonia caused by separation or compression of photoreceptors can be a contributing factor to the existence of diplopia and the inability to fuse in patients with macular disease. Concomitant small-angle strabismus and the inability to fuse with prisms may lead the clinician to the incorrect diagnosis of central disruption of fusion. Surgical intervention does not necessarily improve the aniseikonia.
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ranking = 207.48611429366
keywords = epiretinal membrane, epiretinal, membrane
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3/131. Macular ring in a patient with Terson's syndrome.

    PURPOSE: To report on a pigmented finding in the macula that is unique to Terson's syndrome, and was previously described only once. METHOD: A 49-year-old man underwent vitrectomy for vitreous hemorrhage due to Terson's syndrome. During surgery the retina was exposed, and a pigmentation was noticed around the macula. Follow-up of the macular finding is presented. RESULTS: At surgery a pigmented "ring" encircling the macula was revealed. Two and six months later, the pigmented line was still noticed, and an epiretinal membrane appeared in the temporal macula. CONCLUSION: Terson's syndrome may be associated with a pigmented "ring" encircling the macula, a finding that may be a result of a detachment of the internal limiting membrane (ILM). The epiretinal membrane that was later noticed, might also be related to the damage to the ILM.
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ranking = 208.48611429366
keywords = epiretinal membrane, epiretinal, membrane
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4/131. Incising the thick retrolental fibrovascular tissue with a hooked sclerotome in persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous.

    A technique for incising thick retrolental fibrovascular tissue and extensive cyclitic membrane is reported in a case of anterior persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. A membranectomy was performed in a 1-month-old post-lensectomy baby via a limbal approach. A sclerotome tip was hooked to cut through an extremely thick fibrovascular tissue by rotating the sclerotome by its grip. Sutherland microscissors (Grieshaber, switzerland) and a vitrectomy cutter were used for further membranectomy. The baby was followed-up until age 18 months. A total of 3 membranectomy sessions were required because of rapid cyclitic membrane formation, severe centripetal retraction of the membrane on the ciliary processes, and posterior synechia. Thorough membranectomy and cutting the iris edge maintained a clear pupillary area during the 13-month postoperative period. Extremely thick retrolental fibrovascular tissue is a challenging condition that can be dealt with by delicate instrumentation.
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ranking = 7
keywords = membrane
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5/131. Ocular involvement in IgA-epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

    epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an autoimmune bullous disease with frequent ocular involvement, but visual loss is rare. In contrast, EBA patients with predominant IgA autoantibodies more frequently develop severe ocular involvement, which tends to be refractory to therapy. We report two patients with 'IgA-EBA' with ocular involvement. Both initially presented with a generalized bullous disease, and direct immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated IgA in the basement membrane zone of the skin, and in the conjunctiva and cornea of patient 1. On salt-split patient skin, IgA was found predominantly on the dermal side of the artificial split in both patients. Direct immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated IgA below the lamina densa in close association with the anchoring fibrils in both patients. In patient 1, who had a prolonged course of the disease, the skin disorder responded well to treatment with cyclosporin, but the ocular involvement ended in bilateral blindness despite repeated surgical treatment. In patient 2, the blister formation and scarring conjunctivitis was stopped by a combination of prednisolone and colchicine. These patients show that in subepithelial blistering diseases, early delineation of disease nosology is critical to detect subtypes with severe ocular involvement such as 'IgA-EBA'. In addition, colchicine may be a valuable alternative in the treatment of EBA with ocular involvement.
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ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
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6/131. Fibroglial proliferation in pars planitis.

    In a 51-year-old patient with long-standing pars planitis, light and electron microscopical examination of the intravitreal 'snowbank' revealed a fibrovascular layer adjacent to the hyperplastic nonpigmented epithelium of the pars plana and an extensive fibroglial proliferation within the vitreous base. The fibrovascular layer consisted of well-differentiated capillaries, probably emanating from the peripheral retina, interspersed with aggregated vitreous fibrils. The fibroglial portion of the 'snowbank' was composed of fibrous astrocyte-like cells which had secreted basement membranes and larger diameter collagen fibrils. This fibroglial tissue was in direct continuity with an ultrastructurally similar preretinal membrane. No significant choroiditis or cyclitis could be demonstrated. It is hypothesized that, in pars planitis, a primary inflammatory process of the peripheral retina and vitreous base may stimulate the observed preretinal and intravitreal fibroglial proliferation.
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ranking = 2
keywords = membrane
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7/131. Electron immunocytochemical analysis of posterior hyaloid associated with diabetic macular edema.

    BACKGROUND: Tangential traction in the macula from a thickened posterior hyaloid of the vitreous has been implicated as a cause of diffuse diabetic macular edema. vitrectomy with peeling of the posterior hyaloid has been shown to reduce retinovascular leakage and improve vision in select patients. We report a clinicopathologic correlation using electron microscopy and electron immunocytochemistry to characterize the membrane infiltrating the posterior hyaloid in two such patients. methods: Two patients presented with vision loss associated with diffuse diabetic macular edema and an attached, thickened, and taut posterior hyaloid. The patients underwent vitrectomy with peeling of the posterior hyaloid. The premacular posterior hyaloid specimens then were analyzed by electron microscopy with immunocytochemical staining for cytokeratin and glial fibrillary acidic protein. RESULTS: Both posterior hyaloid specimens contained collagen and a large cellular component. Immunogold labeling showed cells positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein or cytokeratin. With double labeling, no cells expressed both proteins simultaneously. Clinically, both patients had vision improvement and macular edema resolution after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: The thickened, taut posterior hyaloid observed in our patients with diabetic macular edema contained cells of glial and epithelial origin. This cellular infiltration may contribute to abnormal vitreomacular adherence and could play a role in the pathogenesis of macular edema in some patients with diabetes.
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ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
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8/131. diagnosis of vitreoretinal adhesions in macular disease with optical coherence tomography.

    PURPOSE: To compare the relative incidence of vitreoretinal adhesions associated with partial vitreous separation within the macula diagnosed with optical coherence tomography (OCT) with that of those diagnosed with biomicroscopy. methods: The authors obtained linear cross-sectional retinal images using OCT in patients with selected macular diseases. Additional studies included biomicroscopy, fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, and B-scan ultrasonography. RESULTS: Optical coherence tomography was performed on 132 eyes of 119 patients. Vitreoretinal adhesions within the macula were identified using OCT in 39 eyes (30%) with the following diagnoses: idiopathic epiretinal membrane (n = 13), diabetic retinopathy (n = 7), idiopathic macular hole (n = 7), cystoid macular edema (n = 7), and vitreomacular traction syndrome (n = 5). Biomicroscopy identified vitreoretinal adhesions in only 11 eyes (8%). Two distinct vitreoretinal adhesion patterns were identified with OCT, each associated with partial separation of the posterior hyaloid face: focal (n = 25) and multifocal (n = 14). CONCLUSIONS: Optical coherence tomography is more sensitive than biomicroscopy in identifying vitreoretinal adhesions associated with macular disease.
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ranking = 103.74305714683
keywords = epiretinal membrane, epiretinal, membrane
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9/131. Hypopyon after repeated transplantation of human amniotic membrane onto the corneal surface.

    OBJECTIVE: The authors describe a localized probable immunoreaction after repeated transplantation of amniotic membrane (AM) onto the corneal surface. DESIGN: Interventional case report. INTERVENTION: Amniotic membrane was transplanted onto the corneal surface of a 78-year-old female with a deep trophic corneal ulcer resulting in temporary epithelial closure. A second and finally third amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) was performed because of recurrent ulcerations. All three AMs were obtained from the same donor. RESULTS: The first transplantation of the AM was without complication. However, a hypopyon developed 2 days after the second and 2 days after the third AMT, but the patient responded immediately to topical and systemic corticosteroids. CONCLUSIONS: Immunologic, toxic, and hypersensitivity effects could have contributed to the hypopyon iritis that appeared after the second and third AMT, but not after the initial transplantation. In case of a repeated AMT, the use of AM from different donors may help to minimize the risk of an immediate postoperative intraocular inflammation.
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ranking = 7
keywords = membrane
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10/131. A case of antiepiligrin cicatricial pemphigoid successfully treated by plasmapheresis.

    We report the case of a 73-year-old Japanese woman suffering from antiepiligrin (laminin 5) cicatricial pemphigoid (CP) with typical clinical and immunopathological features. Histologically, the lesional mucous membrane showed a subepidermal blister formation. When indirect immunofluorescence techniques with skin split by 1 M NaCl as the substrate were used, the patient's serum reacted only to the dermal side. immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that the patient's serum contained IgG autoantibodies directed against a set of polypeptides that corresponded to epiligrin (laminin 5). After corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents had been administered systemically, the patient's autoantibody titer decreased and the cutaneous and mucosal blister formations were suppressed. However, the ocular lesions persisted in spite of these therapeutic regimens. After combining these treatments with double-filtration plasmapheresis, the ocular lesions improved and showed almost no progression. plasmapheresis may thus present a new option for the treatment of CP.
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ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
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