Cases reported "Eye Foreign Bodies"

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1/18. Intraocular caterpillar setae without subsequent vitritis or iridocyclitis.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of caterpillar setae embedded in the corneal stroma and inferotemporal retina with minimal inflammation. DESIGN: Observational case report. methods: A 4-year-old boy developed a red eye after playing with a caterpillar. He was placed on topical tobramycin/dexamethasone and referred for evaluation of embedded setae in his conjunctiva, cornea, iris, and retina. Examination revealed no iridocyclitis or vitritis. RESULTS: Because of the lack of intraocular inflammatory response, no invasive intervention was conducted to remove or destroy the setae and he was tapered off the tobramycin/dexamethasone. At 4-month follow-up he remained asymptomatic with the setae still present in both his cornea and retina. In addition, vitreous membranes had formed in the immediate vicinity of the intraretinal setae. CONCLUSION: Intraretinal and corneal setae can be embedded with minimal inflammation and can be tolerated without need for surgical intervention.
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ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
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2/18. Lenticular chalcosis--electron microscopic and microprobe analysis. A case report.

    A patient with a retained intra-ocular foreign body had a lens extraction for lenticular chalcosis. The lens capsule, examined under an electron microscope, showed copper particles deposited in the basement membrane. The lens capsule and foreign body were examined with an electron microprobe beam. This method proved to be an efficient method of qualitative and quantitative analysis of the contents of the foreign body.
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ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
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3/18. Occult anterior-chamber metallic fragment post-phacoemulsification masquerading as chronic recalcitrant postoperative inflammation.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of an occult, metallic, anterior-chamber intraocular foreign body after uneventful phacoemulsification that was masquerading as chronic recalcitrant postoperative inflammation. DESIGN: Interventional case report. methods: A 73-year-old patient was referred to us for recalcitrant anterior-chamber inflammation after uneventful phacoemulsification; the patient presented with visual disturbances, anterior-chamber inflammation, and macular epiretinal membrane with concomitant cystoid macular edema. RESULTS: After meticulous evaluations and repeated clinical examinations, a metallic intraocular foreign body was discovered on the iris, which was surgically removed and analyzed. Chemical analysis revealed copper, aluminum, and zinc. Pars plana vitrectomy with epiretinal membrane and indocyanine-green-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling followed, with subsequent improvement of visual acuity. CONCLUSIONS: Intraocular foreign bodies should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of recalcitrant inflammation post-phacoemulsification. However, in the absence of intraocular inflammation, surgical removal of such particles is questionable.
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ranking = 1415.6480469036
keywords = epiretinal membrane, epiretinal, membrane
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4/18. Corneal argyrosis associated with silver soldering.

    We report a patient who developed corneal argyrosis secondary to occupational silver soldering. Clinically, the cornea was notable for a green-brown discoloration localized to Descemet's membrane by slit-lamp biomicroscopy. silver particles were identified within the anterior three eighths of Descemet's membrane by light and electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis. To our knowledge, the association between corneal argyrosis and silver soldering has not been previously reported.
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ranking = 2
keywords = membrane
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5/18. Intraoperative breakage of 20-gauge Tano forceps.

    PURPOSE: To report three cases with breakage of a 20-gauge kryptonite forceps during vitreoretinal surgery. DESIGN: Interventional case report. methods: Pars plana vitrectomy that included a membrane peeling was performed in three patients through standard ports with 20-gauge vitrectomy systems. The peeling procedure was attempted with the end-gripping kryptonite forceps. RESULTS: Intraoperatively, the branch/tip broke and dropped onto the posterior pole. Removal of the broken part was uncomplicated, and the subsequent clinical course was unremarkable. In one case, the handle and branch/tip part were exchanged inadvertently. In the other two cases, neither an exchange nor a maladaptation of the parts was noted. CONCLUSION: An exchange of the hand piece and gripping end may increase the risk of breakage and retinal damage. The delicate gripping tips, however, may break because of inadequate maintenance and/or aging of the material. Intraoperative visual and functional examination is recommended before intraocular use.
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ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
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6/18. Management of subretinal foreign bodies with a cannulated extrusion needle.

    We treated two patients who had nonmagnetic subretinal foreign bodies (metallic pellet and lens nucleus fragment) in the presence of a retinal detachment and a distant retinal break. After the pars plana vitrectomy, the soft, flexible tip of the cannulated extrusion needle was used to push the foreign object gently away from the posterior pole toward the retinal break where it was grasped and removed from the eye. This technique for subretinal foreign body removal is preferable to creating a large posterior retinotomy overlying the foreign body because of the potential risks of further macular trauma, hemorrhage, or proliferation of periretinal membranes from the retinotomy site.
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ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
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7/18. Long-term corneal retention of a plant foreign body.

    A fragment of sunflower stalk had been retained in the cornea of a 71-year-old man for 58 years. During initial healing of the wound, which included formation of a retrocorneal membrane over the foreign body in the anterior chamber, there was probably loss of endothelial cells. This probably predisposed the cornea to the endothelial decompensation that occurred following cataract extraction and implant of an intraocular lens 56 years after the foreign body first appeared in the cornea.
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ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
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8/18. Surface reaction on glass anterior chamber foreign-body removed 24 hours after injury.

    An early stage in the formation of a reactive membrane on the exposed surface of a glass foreign body in the anterior chamber is demonstrated. It is emphasized that the formation of reactive membranes on the surface of foreign bodies in the anterior segment of the eye give the cytologic impression of different stages of successful adaptation.
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ranking = 2
keywords = membrane
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9/18. Protective effect of occlusion on disciform degeneration.

    One patient developed disciform degeneration and loss of central vision despite laser application. Sixty-two years before, the contralateral eye had sustained a penetrating steel injury with subsequent scarring and pupillary membrane and cataract formation. This eye, when surgically rehabilitated, showed no signs of macular degeneration. Although alluded to, we know of no other known cases of occluded eyes being spared of senile macular degeneration reported in the literature. We postulate that unfiltered, ambient light may be the cause of macular degeneration and suggest that more emphasis should be placed on prevention of macular degeneration by the use of protective eye wear.
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ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
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10/18. Intrusion of retinal tacks.

    We examined nine patients in whom retinal tacks intruded into the eye and lodged in the subretinal space, preretinal space, vitreous cavity, or anterior chamber. Complications included retinal pigment epithelium atrophy; retinal phlebitis; vitreous hemorrhage; focal corneal, iris, and retinal injury; and corneal edema. The intrusion of the retinal tacks did not apparently cause, but was associated with retinal redetachment in five patients. Factors associated with intrusion of the retinal tacks included absence of a barb at the end of the tack to anchor it to the sclera, absence of a groove in the tack, a short shaft, incomplete penetration of the retina, choroid, and sclera by the tack, self-inflicted trauma to the eye, placing a scleral buckle after inserting the tacks, and reproliferation of periretinal membranes. In four patients the intruded tacks did not cause any complications. In four patients the intruded tacks were removed without complications and in the remaining five patients, they were left in the eye.
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ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
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