Cases reported "Eye Foreign Bodies"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/18. Chorioretinal vascular anastomoses after perforating trauma to the eye.

    A 32-year-old white man sustained an ocular injury with a small piece of metal. He had perforation of the retina and choroid, and later developed chorioretinal vascular anastomosis. Disabling complications, such as neovascular growth, serous transudation, or hemorrhages, did not occur within a ten-month follow-up period. Interruption of Bruch's membrane and the retinal pigment epithelium, with approximation of the normally separated vasculatures of the choroid and retina, appears necessary for such anastomoses to occur.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/18. vitrectomy techniques in the management of selected penetrating ocular injuries.

    Closed vitrectomy techniques provide new capabilities to treat severe penetrating ocular injuries involving posterior segment structures. With these methods damaged iris tissue, lens, and vitreous can be removed and intraocular opacities can be cleared to identify and treat any retinal damage. Removal of damaged vitreous also prevents later cyclitic membrane formation and traction on the retina. The vitrectomy technique can be combined with additional methods to treat other conditions including nonmagnetic intraocular foreign bodies. We present the rationale and technique of vitrectomy together with the results of treatment in 51 consecutive cases of penetrating ocular trauma. Guidelines are offered for management of severe penetrating injuries.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/18. Clinical and research aspects of subtotal open-sky vitrectomy. XXXVII Edward Jackson Memorial Lecture.

    Subtotal open-sky vitrectomy can be used to improve visual function in some eyes for which closed vitrectomy is useless. Open-sky vitrectomy allows easier access for surgical instruments, especially to anterior fundus structures. The technique also improves the visibility of intraocular structures. The surgical procedure, which uses special instruments and high-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid, is divided into four stages: preparation, operating inside the vitreous cavity, wound closure, and retinal reattachment. In 290 consecutive operations for which complete follow-up data are available, retinal reattachment was achieved in 61 eyes (21%). The greatest number of successes (16 of 30 cases [53%]) was achieved in severe tractional retinal detachments. Such results are encouraging because these eyes were considered inoperable by other techniques. Open-sky vitreous surgery is performed through a corneal incision, but a scleral incision over the pars plana may become the method of choice in selected cases. The development of a preretinal fibrin membrane, as a result of either a closed vitrectomy or an open-sky procedure, may be a major cause of postoperative failure. Hypotony during surgery is probably the main precipitating factor of intraocular fibrin membrane formation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/18. Diagnostic vitrectomy.

    The histopathologic and cytopathologic study of ocular fluids obtained for diagnostic purposes is presented. The analysis of fluid specimens with millipore filter, celloidin bag-cell block, and transmission electron microscopy techniques has proved to be effective for establishing and confirming clinical diagnoses. Diagnostic vitrectomy can be readily used to evaluate such conditions as intraocular tumors, lens and blood-induced glaucoma, inflammatory conditions, amyloidosis, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), epithelial ingrowth, and tractional vitreoretinal membranes.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/18. Severe toxic keratopathy secondary to topical anesthetic abuse.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical findings in three cases of abuse of topically administered ophthalmic anesthetics and to review the clinical signs, diagnosis and treatment. DESIGN: Case series. SETTING: Two university-affiliated hospitals in Montreal. patients: Three patients with toxic keratopathy due to abuse of topically applied anesthetics. RESULTS: The three patients presented with a nonhealing epithelial defect, marked stromal edema, folds in Descemet's membrane and a typical stromal ring infiltrate. All three required a conjunctival flap, and two underwent penetrating keratoplasty. The drugs (0.5% tetracaine and 0.5% proparacaine) were easily obtained, at the workplace in two cases and by stealing from the ophthalmologist's examining room in the third case. CONCLUSIONS: The unrestricted availability of topically applied ophthalmic anesthetics as over-the-counter medications in canada must be reevaluated.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/18. Intraocular cilia. Report of six cases of 6 weeks' to 32 years' duration.

    In this study, we describe the clinicopathologic features seen in six cases of intraocular cilia and review the features of previously reported cases. Ultrastructural studies of the cilia showed partial loss of the cuticle layer, diffuse accumulation of small electron-dense granules in cuticle and cortical cells, and loss of continuous cell membranes of the cortex. The cilia were almost completely intact in most of our cases. Intraocular cilia can be tolerated for long periods.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/18. Autogenous labial mucous membrane and banked scleral patch grafting for exposed retinal explants.

    Following retinal detachment surgery, exposure of the scleral explant is uncommon and usually requires its removal. In patients with a history of multiple retinal detachment procedures or continuing vitreoretinal traction removal of an explant can lead to retinal redetachment. In such patients it is preferable to cover and retain an exposed explant rather than remove it. Various techniques have been described to cover exposed explants. If the exposed area is small a conjunctivoplasty or conjunctival graft is usually adequate. The use of banked scleral patch grafts has been described in the management of exposed orbital implants. We describe the use of this technique in combination with a labial mucous membrane graft in four patients with an exposed silicone retinal explant. With a minimum follow-up period of 11 months the explant remains covered in all patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/18. indocyanine green angiographic findings in sympathetic ophthalmia.

    PURPOSE: To analyze indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) features in two cases of sympathetic ophthalmia using a standard angiography protocol for posterior uveitis. methods: Report on two patients who suffered from penetrating ocular injuries 45 and 8 years before sympathetic ophthalmia was diagnosed and confirmed by histopathological examination of the enucleated eye. In addition to routine examination and fluorescein angiography, initial and follow-up ICGAs were performed. RESULTS: The first patient, with a phthisic right eye following s shotgun injury, consulted 6 months after cataract extraction in his good left eye for progressive visual loss due to a neovascular membrane in a moderately inflamed eye. The second patient consulted 8 years after a perforating injury of his right eye by a metallic foreign body because of recent visual loss and inflammation in his good left eye. ICGA of both patients showed numerous hypofluorescent dark dots visible at the intermediate phase, some becoming isofluorescent at the late phase and resolving after long-term corticosteroid therapy, others remaining hypofluorescent until the late phase. CONCLUSION: The two patterns of hypofluorescent areas, either persisting throughout angiography or fading in the late phase, were interpreted respectively as cicatricial and active lesions. ICGA gave determining additional information on choroidal involvement and on subsequent evolution of lesions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous |


Leave a message about 'Eye Foreign Bodies'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.