Cases reported "Eye Foreign Bodies"

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1/64. The role of ultrasound biomicroscopy in ocular trauma.

    PURPOSE: To demonstrate the usefulness of ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) in detecting and localizing small ocular foreign bodies. methods: This is a retrospective study of the records of 555 consecutive patients evaluated by UBM by the Visual physiology Unit of the wills eye Hospital from August 1994 to November 1997. RESULTS: In 9 patients, a foreign body was identified. In 6 patients, the history suggested the presence of a foreign body, but one could not be detected by clinical examination. In 2 patients, the referring physicians requested UBM to determine whether or how deep a known foreign body had penetrated the globe. In 1 patient, the foreign body was not suspected clinically. In regard to other diagnostic techniques, CT failed to identify the foreign body in 1 patient. In another, contact B-scan ultrasonography failed. In a third, both CT and contact B-scan ultrasonography failed. The foreign body was intracorneal in 2 eyes, subconjunctival in 2, intrascleral in 3, and intraocular in 2. Six were nonmetallic. Two were metallic. In one case, the foreign body was lost and its composition is unknown. In 5 cases, the UBM findings altered the patient's management. CONCLUSIONS: UBM is a valuable adjunct in the evaluation of small, anteriorly located foreign body that may not be detectable by other methods. UBM may be especially useful for finding nonmetallic foreign bodies.
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ranking = 1
keywords = metal
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2/64. hyphema caused by a metallic intraocular foreign body during magnetic resonance imaging.

    PURPOSE: To report a 63-year-old man with a retained intraocular foreign body who developed a hyphema during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. methods: Case report and review of the current literature on ocular injury caused by intraocular foreign bodies when subjected to an electromagnetic field. RESULTS: Our patient underwent a brain MRI, and the intraocular foreign body caused a hyphema and increased intraocular pressure. The presence and location of the intraocular foreign body were determined by computed tomography (CT). CONCLUSION: magnetic resonance imaging can cause serious ocular injury in patients with ferromagnetic intraocular foreign bodies. This case demonstrates the importance of obtaining an occupational history, and, when indicated, a skull x-ray or CT to rule out intraocular foreign body before an MRI study.
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ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = metal
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3/64. Surgical treatment of penetrating orbito-cranial injuries. Case report.

    Penetrating orbital injuries are not frequent but neither are they rare. The various diagnostic and therapeutic problems are related to the nature of the penetrating object, its velocity, shape and size as well as the possibility that it may be partially or wholly retained within the orbit. The authors present another case with unusual characteristics and discuss the strategies available for the best possible treatment of this traumatic pathology in the light of the published data. The patient in this case was a young man involved in a road accident who presented orbito-cerebral penetration caused by a metal rod with a protective plastic cap. Following the accident, the plastic cap (2.5x2 cm) was partially retained in the orbit. At initial clinical examination, damage appeared to be exclusively ophthalmological. Subsequent CT scan demonstrated the degree of intracerebral involvement. The damaged cerebral tissue was removed together with bone fragments via a bifrontal craniotomy, the foreign body was extracted and the dura repaired. Postoperative recovery was normal and there were no neuro-ophthalmological deficits at long-term clinical assessment. Orbito-cranial penetration, which is generally associated with violent injuries caused by high-velocity missiles, may not be suspected in traumas produced by low-velocity objects. Diagnostic orientation largely depends on precise knowledge of the traumatic event and the object responsible. When penetration is suspected and/or the object responsible is inadequately identified, a CT scan is indicated. The type of procedure to adopt for extraction, depends on the size and nature of the retained object. Although the possibility of non-surgical extraction has been described, surgical removal is the safest form of treatment in cases with extensive laceration and brain contusion.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = metal
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4/64. Compound nevus of the cornea simulating a foreign body.

    PURPOSE: To report a corneal nevus, without conjunctival involvement, that clinically simulated a metallic foreign body. methods: Case report with clinicopathologic correlation. RESULTS: A 22-year-old man developed a superficial pigmented lesion of his left cornea. It was suspected to be a chronically retained foreign body, but a melanocytic neoplasm could not be excluded. The lesion was removed by lamellar keratectomy and proved histopathologically to be a compound nevus of the cornea, without conjunctival involvement. CONCLUSIONS: Melanocytic nevus can rarely occur in the cornea. Involvement of the cornea by a melanocytic lesion does not necessarily imply a malignant melanoma.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = metal
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5/64. Successful treatment of paecilomyces lilacinus endophthalmitis after foreign body trauma to the cornea.

    PURPOSE: To report the successful treatment of a patient with paecilomyces lilacinus endophthalmitis infection after foreign body (FB) trauma to the cornea. methods: A 30-year-old man presented to us with a corneal abscess and iritis 2 months after removal of a metal corneal FB. Initial corneal biopsy culture was negative. Treatment with topical 5% natamycin, 0.9% fortified gentamycin, and 5% cephalothin hourly was commenced. As a result of developing signs of endophthalmitis, two more biopsies were taken, a week apart, from the vitreous and anterior chamber, successively. The last biopsy yielded positive microbiologic results of the specious paecilomyces lilacinus. Intravitreal injection of 50 microg/0.5 mL of amphotericin was administered during the vitreal biopsy. Soon after isolating the specious paecilomyces lilacinus, the following treatment was administered: 200 mg of itraconazole bd by mouth, 5% topical natamycin every hour, 2 mg/mL of topical fluconazole every 2 hours, three anterior chamber injections of 0.35 mL of 0.1% fluconazole and two amphotericin b injections to the anterior chamber of 50 microg/0.5 mL each. RESULTS: There appeared to be no sign of infection 6 months after initial treatment. A large, dense scar existed in the medial part of the cornea only. The pupil was secluded. The patient's visual acuity was 6/21. The eye was comfortable and all topical antifungal medication was ceased.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = metal
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6/64. X-ray turns a blind eye to ferrous metal.

    The case is reported of a 31-year-old man with a retained metallic intraocular foreign body (IOFB) in the left eye who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for investigation of a subsequent unrelated brachial plexus injury Despite the patient providing good history of IOFB, the decision to proceed with MRI was based on screening orbit X-ray which was reported as normal. A review of published reports regarding screening recommendations for MRI for patients with IOFB is provided. A minimum recommendation is for prescreening questionnaire; belief of the patient history is critical. If there is any doubt after history and examination by an ophthalmologist, then computed tomography imaging of the orbits is recommended.Whether screening by plain X-ray imaging is worthwhile is debatable as the sensitivity and specificity of this modality is poor.
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ranking = 1.6666666666667
keywords = metal
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7/64. A metallic foreign body presenting in the anterior chamber angle.

    PURPOSE: This article describes a case in which a patient presented with a previously undetected metallic foreign body in the anterior chamber angle. methods AND RESULTS: A 42-year-old Hispanic man presented with a 5-day history of foreign-body sensation and redness in his left eye. He had been using a hand saw without safety glasses 2 days before the onset of his initial symptoms. Physical examination revealed a metallic foreign body embedded in the inferior angle of his left eye. Surgical removal of the foreign body was performed, and the patient remains well 1 year after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: All physicians should maintain a high degree of clinical suspicion for intraocular foreign bodies when presented with a patient who may have sustained ocular trauma. All eye-care providers need to emphasize the need for proper eye protection to patients who engage in high risk activities that may lead to penetrating ocular trauma.
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ranking = 2
keywords = metal
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8/64. Corneal laceration and intraocular foreign body in a post-LASIK eye.

    PURPOSE: To describe a case of full-thickness corneal laceration and intraocular foreign body in an eye that underwent laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). methods: A 43-year-old man underwent uneventful bilateral LASIK. Seventeen months after LASIK, the patient suffered penetrating trauma to the right eye while hammering metal without safety glasses. Examination on the night of the injury showed an uncorrected visual acuity of 20/30 in the right eye. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy showed a 2.4-mm full-thickness peripheral corneal laceration at the 11-o'clock position extending over the edge of the previous LASIK flap and a foreign body partially embedded in the superior iris. He was started on prophylactic topical and intravenous antibiotics. Under general anesthesia, the corneal laceration was repaired, and the intraocular foreign body was removed without any complications. RESULTS: At the follow-up visit 9 months after the surgery, the uncorrected visual acuity was 20/25 in the right eye. On slit-lamp examination, the corneal sutures and the well-positioned LASIK flap were in place. CONCLUSION: Penetrating trauma of the cornea did not lead to flap-related complications in this post-LASIK eye. Repair of the corneal laceration and removal of the intraocular foreign body after LASIK were managed without complications. Care must be taken to try not to manipulate or lift the LASIK flap during corneal laceration repair.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = metal
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9/64. Accidentally discovered large metallic intra-orbital foreign body.

    A 6.2 cm long and 2.7 cm thick metallic foreign body was accidentally found and removed from a 62 years old man. He was sent to a minor operation theater for repair of left lower lid laceration secondary to trauma after a fight. Subsequent investigation, management, patient follow-up and outcome are discussed. Importance of careful history taking, thorough physical examination and proper investigations are stressed.
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ranking = 1.6666666666667
keywords = metal
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10/64. Intralenticular metallic foreign body.

    We report the case of a 58-year-old man who despite having an intralenticular metallic foreign body maintained good vision for at least 40 years. We describe the natural course of intraocular foreign body and the healing capacity of the anterior lens capsule as well as management issues to consider when dealing with intraocular foreign bodies.
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keywords = metal
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