Cases reported "Eye Foreign Bodies"

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1/58. Post-traumatic endophthalmitis: causative organisms and visual outcome.

    PURPOSE: Post-traumatic endophthalmitis makes up a distinct subset of intraocular infections. The purpose of the present study was to identify the causative organisms and record the visual outcome after infectious endophthalmitis in eyes with penetrating trauma. methods: We reviewed 18 consecutive cases of culture-positive endophthalmitis that developed after penetrating ocular trauma. All cases were treated with pars plana vitrectomy and intravenous and intraocular antibiotics. RESULTS: The 15 males and 3 females ranged in age from 4 to 43 years (mean 25.1 /- 11 years). Nine (50%) had intraocular foreign bodies. A single species was isolated in 16 cases, and multiple organisms in two. staphylococcus epidermidis and gram-negative organisms were the most frequent and were cultured either alone or in association with other organisms in respectively five (27.7%) and four cases (22.2%). clostridium perfringens was isolated in three cases (16.6%). bacillus was not found as a cause of endophthalmitis. Final visual acuity was better than 20/400 in eight cases (44%). In five cases (27.7%), the eye was saved but visual acuity was counting fingers. Two eyes (11%) had no light perception. The remaining three eyes (16.6%) were enucleated or eviscerated. clostridium perfringens was isolated from two eyes and aspergillus niger from one. Postoperative retinal detachment developed in four eyes, which were successfully operated. CONCLUSIONS: Organisms isolated in this series were similar to those in previous reports of post-traumatic endophthalmitis from other parts of the world, except that the frequency of clostridium perfringens isolation was high and no bacillus species were cultured. In view of its devastating outcome, post-traumatic endophthalmitis must be treated promptly with vitrectomy and intravitreal antibiotics.
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2/58. The importance of CT scans in planning the removal of orbital-frontal lobe foreign bodies.

    PURPOSE: To describe the management of foreign bodies in the orbit and frontal lobe. methods: Reports of two cases. RESULTS: Both patients underwent successful removal of an orbital-cerebral foreign body by anterior orbitotomy. CONCLUSION: Computed tomography was useful to confirm preoperatively that the foreign body was not adjacent to cerebral blood vessels and to monitor postoperatively for cerebral hemorrhage. A team approach is necessary in the management of orbital-frontal lobe foreign bodies.
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3/58. eye injuries in a terrorist bombing: Dhahran, saudi arabia, June 25, 1996.

    OBJECTIVE: We report the experience of our institution in the evaluation and care of multiple simultaneous ocular trauma patients after a terrorist bomb attack on a united states military base in saudi arabia. DESIGN: Retrospective, noncomparative small case series. PARTICIPANTS: Three patients who received severe ocular injuries after a terrorist bombing. INTERVENTION: All patients underwent surgical repair of the injuries that were inflicted as a result of the terrorist bombing. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Baseline ocular characteristics, intraoperative findings, surgical procedures, and final (3 years after injury) anatomic and visual outcomes were noted. RESULTS: glass fragments caused by the blast were the mechanism of all the ocular injuries in these patients. All patients had primary repair of the injuries done in saudi arabia and were sent to our institution for tertiary care. Three of the four eyes injured had stable or improved visual acuity and one eye was enucleated. Two patients had no serious injury other than the globe trauma. One patient had extensive eyelid trauma and required serial procedures to allow fitting of a prosthesis. CONCLUSIONS: Blast-injury patients are at risk for open globe injury as a result of glass fragments. The types of injury that can occur from terrorist blasts can be extensive and involve all the tissues of the eye, the ocular adnexa, and the orbit.
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4/58. Surgical treatment of penetrating orbito-cranial injuries. Case report.

    Penetrating orbital injuries are not frequent but neither are they rare. The various diagnostic and therapeutic problems are related to the nature of the penetrating object, its velocity, shape and size as well as the possibility that it may be partially or wholly retained within the orbit. The authors present another case with unusual characteristics and discuss the strategies available for the best possible treatment of this traumatic pathology in the light of the published data. The patient in this case was a young man involved in a road accident who presented orbito-cerebral penetration caused by a metal rod with a protective plastic cap. Following the accident, the plastic cap (2.5x2 cm) was partially retained in the orbit. At initial clinical examination, damage appeared to be exclusively ophthalmological. Subsequent CT scan demonstrated the degree of intracerebral involvement. The damaged cerebral tissue was removed together with bone fragments via a bifrontal craniotomy, the foreign body was extracted and the dura repaired. Postoperative recovery was normal and there were no neuro-ophthalmological deficits at long-term clinical assessment. Orbito-cranial penetration, which is generally associated with violent injuries caused by high-velocity missiles, may not be suspected in traumas produced by low-velocity objects. Diagnostic orientation largely depends on precise knowledge of the traumatic event and the object responsible. When penetration is suspected and/or the object responsible is inadequately identified, a CT scan is indicated. The type of procedure to adopt for extraction, depends on the size and nature of the retained object. Although the possibility of non-surgical extraction has been described, surgical removal is the safest form of treatment in cases with extensive laceration and brain contusion.
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5/58. Intracranial penetrating orbital injury.

    The authors report a case of double-penetrating injury of the globe with intracranial involvement from a pellet gun. A 16-year-old boy had a visual acuity of bare light perception in the left eye after being hit by a pellet. There was an inferior limbal entry site, dense hyphema, and no view of the fundus. Computed tomographic scan showed the pellet intracranially close to the left cavernous sinus. After neurosurgical clearance, the patient underwent primary closure of the corneoscleral entry site followed 3 weeks later by pars plana vitrectomy, lensectomy, and repair of a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. At 12 months postoperatively, visual acuity was 20/300 and the retina was attached. Our case demonstrates the potential for significant visual recovery in some patients with a penetrating orbital injury and intracranial involvement. Complete radiographic evaluation with neurosurgical consultation is important in the management of these patients prior to ophthalmologic intervention with possible foreign body removal. There is a need for more public awareness regarding the potentially harmful effects of pellet guns.
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6/58. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in the diagnosis and management of pars planitis caused by caterpillar hairs.

    PURPOSE: To report the use of ultrasound biomicroscopy in the detection of caterpillar hairs in the pars plana in a patient with unilateral pars planitis. METHOD: Ultrasound biomicroscopic imaging of the anterior segment of the eye. RESULTS: Ultrasound biomicroscopy located a hair in the posterior chamber at the first visit and five more in the pars plana 1 month later. This finding was confirmed intraoperatively. CONCLUSION: Ultrasound biomicroscopy is useful in the diagnosis and management of unilateral pars planitis of uncertain cause.
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7/58. Two remarkable events in the field of intraocular foreign body: (1) The reversal of siderosis bulbi. (2) The spontaneous extrusion of an intraocular copper foreign body.

    Two unusual events concerning intraocular foreign bodies are presented. The first patient had an occult or unsuspected intraocular foreign body. He showed iridoplegia with mydriasis, siderosis iridis, and an intraocular piece of iron lying posteriorly near the retina. The foreign body was removed and the patient regained normal iris color and pupillary activity. His vision remains 20/15 six years postoperatively dispite ensuing retinal detachment one year after removal of the foreign body. The second patient was a young boy injured by a blasting cap explosion. He lost one eye from the injury and had a piece of intraocular brass in his left eye. In spite of the development of chalcosis and a mature cataract the lens gradually shrank in the pupillary space permitting a clear aphakic area and 20/25 vision. The brass fragment migrated forward and inferiorly and was finally extruded under the conjunctiva five years later, where it was removed and chemically analyzed by x-ray diffraction.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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8/58. Fluorescein angiographic findings in ocular siderosis.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of siderosis from a retained intraocular iron foreign body manifesting localized retinal capillary nonperfusion documented by fluorescein angiography. methods: Case Report. In a 35-year-old man with decreased vision in the left eye, studies included fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, visual field testing, and electrophysiology. Surgical foreign body extraction and histopathologic examination were performed. RESULTS: Preoperatively, in the left eye, humphrey visual fields and electrophysiology testing revealed marked depression. fluorescein angiography demonstrated nasal capillary nonperfusion with occlusion of the second- and third-order arterioles extending along a gradient from the foreign body. Microscopic examination of the lens capsule confirmed the diagnosis of siderosis secondary to a retained iron foreign body. CONCLUSION: Extensive capillary nonperfusion may be associated with a retained iron intraocular foreign body, as documented by fluorescein angiography.
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9/58. Wooden foreign bodies in facial injury: a radiological pitfall.

    foreign bodies can present a diagnostic challenge to the maxillofacial surgeon. Three patients, who suffered from a penetrating injury with a wooden foreign body, were examined and treated. Their preoperative CT and MRI scans were evaluated. In an acute case, the penetrating wooden body mimicked air bubbles. In the other two patients, the wood was retained for several months and appeared with a much higher density on CT. In MRI the wooden foreign bodies gave a low signal intensity. In all injuries removal of the foreign body was delayed, because it was initially radiologically missed or misdiagnosed. In the appropriate trauma setting a penetrating wooden body must always be considered. Its attenuation value increases with time as water is absorbed from the surrounding tissues. Although the radiological appearance may show a great variety, CT imaging is the basic diagnostic technique. MRI is the method of second choice.
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keywords = operative
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10/58. Retained orbital wooden foreign body: a surgical technique and rationale.

    OBJECTIVE: To emphasize the potential complications of a retained orbital wooden foreign body (WFB) and the rationale of a surgical technique. DESIGN: Two interventional case reports. PARTICIPANTS: Two patients sustained an orbital WFB injury. Both patients had ocular complications despite repeated attempts to remove the suspected residues. INTERVENTION: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of both patients at different intervals revealed evidence of orbital foreign body migration toward the cranium. A surgical technique combing transcranial and orbital approaches was used to remove the residues. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Preoperative and postoperative vision, proptosis, ocular motility, and various ocular symptoms and signs. RESULTS: In both patients, no postoperative complications were seen, and all preoperative symptoms and signs were resolved at 9- and 19-month follow-ups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: A retained orbital WFB can cause early or late complications and is known to have the potential to migrate intracranially. In selected patients, a team approach may be the best technique to ensure complete removal.
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ranking = 4
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