Cases reported "Eye Foreign Bodies"

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1/11. Unidentified foreign objects in the wound after clear corneal tunnel phacoemulsification.

    We describe the presence of unidentified foreign objects, including small freckles and fibrillary material, in the corneal stroma seen on slitlamp biomicroscopy in 2 patients who had uneventful clear corneal tunnel phacoemulsification. Clinically, these foreign objects did not appear to affect the final visual outcome. Further study is required to explain their source, role in the wound healing, and toxicity and the behavior of metallic particles in the magnetic field in relation to magnetic resonance imaging.
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keywords = phacoemulsification
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2/11. Retained anterior chamber cilium causing endophthalmitis after phacoemulsification.

    An 81-year-old white man had uneventful cataract surgery by an experienced surgeon. Three days postoperatively, he presented with endophthalmitis and was treated in accordance with the standard departmental protocol. During the recovery, a curvilinear foreign body was identified and subsequently removed from the interior anterior chamber. Histological examination confirmed the foreign body as an eyelash. The patient improved to a final corrected visual acuity of 6/9. The relevant literature is reviewed, and ways to prevent this potentially blinding but avoidable complication of intraocular surgery are presented.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = phacoemulsification
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3/11. Occult anterior-chamber metallic fragment post-phacoemulsification masquerading as chronic recalcitrant postoperative inflammation.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of an occult, metallic, anterior-chamber intraocular foreign body after uneventful phacoemulsification that was masquerading as chronic recalcitrant postoperative inflammation. DESIGN: Interventional case report. methods: A 73-year-old patient was referred to us for recalcitrant anterior-chamber inflammation after uneventful phacoemulsification; the patient presented with visual disturbances, anterior-chamber inflammation, and macular epiretinal membrane with concomitant cystoid macular edema. RESULTS: After meticulous evaluations and repeated clinical examinations, a metallic intraocular foreign body was discovered on the iris, which was surgically removed and analyzed. Chemical analysis revealed copper, aluminum, and zinc. Pars plana vitrectomy with epiretinal membrane and indocyanine-green-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling followed, with subsequent improvement of visual acuity. CONCLUSIONS: Intraocular foreign bodies should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of recalcitrant inflammation post-phacoemulsification. However, in the absence of intraocular inflammation, surgical removal of such particles is questionable.
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ranking = 1.4
keywords = phacoemulsification
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4/11. Corneal honeybee sting.

    BACKGROUND: We report the complications and management of a retained bee sting injury to the cornea. The case highlights the acute and chronic management of an uncommon injury and its pathogenesis. methods: A 67-year-old man was attacked by a swarm of bees and was referred for severe chemosis on the right eye. A retained corneal bee stinger (ovipositor) was seen but removal was only partially successful. He subsequently developed a large corneal epithelial defect, anterior uveitis, intractable glaucoma, traumatic cataract, toxic optic neuropathy, and corneal scarring. We reviewed the literature on corneal bee sting injuries and their complications. RESULTS: inflammation was controlled with topical steroids and the patient underwent a combined phacoemulsification and trabeculectomy with mitomycin-C for uncontrolled glaucoma. However, optic neuropathy did not resolve. INTERPRETATION: Corneal bee sting injuries are uncommon but can result in severe sight-threatening complications such as toxic optic neuropathy. Early recognition of the possible complications and appropriate treatment may help to prevent permanent loss of vision. Removal of a retained corneal bee stinger remains controversial.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = phacoemulsification
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5/11. Traumatic cataract and intralenticular foreign body.

    Traumatic cataracts resulting from penetrating injuries occur most frequently from projectile metallic foreign bodies. The majority of intraocular foreign bodies cause sight-threatening damage including traumatic cataract in up to 25% of the cases. A case of traumatic cataract and retained intralenticular foreign body that was removed successfully with phacoemulsification and foldable intraocular lens implantation in the capsular bag is described. This case report highlights the benefit in planning surgical management as a two-staged procedure after appropriate investigations.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = phacoemulsification
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6/11. Migratory intraocular cilium following phacoemulsification.

    A case of an intraocular cilium noted in the anterior chamber after routine small incision phacoemulsification is described. The cilium was noted on the third postoperative day. It initially protruded internally from the paracentesis site and subsequently pierced the peripheral iris to migrate through to the posterior chamber to finally re-emerge through the pupil and come to rest in the inferior angle. No adverse effects have been noted and the patient's visual acuity was stable at 6/5 after 6 months of follow up.
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keywords = phacoemulsification
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7/11. Origin of intraocular metallic foreign bodies during phacoemulsification.

    This is the first report of a case of intraocular metallic foreign bodies retained after phacoemulsification in which the source was identified as silver emanating from the brazing of the irrigation tube as it entered the handpiece shell on its inner diameter. Although silver is considered to be inert in the eye and nonmagnetic, manufacturers should evaluate alternate methods of phacoemulsification handpiece design.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = phacoemulsification
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8/11. Intralenticular intraocular foreign body after stone impact: CT and US findings.

    Introduction: Intraocular foreign body (IOFB) is a relatively common entity in emergency departments worldwide. Appropriate ocular assessment is mandatory if an intraocular foreign body is suspected because it is associated with an increased risk of endophtalmitis and a wide range of complications including hyphaema, cataract, vitreous hemorrhage, and retinal tears and detachment. Case report: We present a case of intralenticular intraocular foreign body after stone impact. Discussion: ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) show an accurate location of the foreign body inside the lens. This finding enabled the surgeon to perform a phacoemulsification lens extraction with removal of the foreign body, the optimal method of removing intralenticular IOFB. To our knowledge, this is the first US and CT imaging report.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = phacoemulsification
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9/11. Inert intraocular eyelash foreign body following phacoemulsification cataract surgery.

    INTRODUCTION: We describe the first reported case of tolerated eyelash inoculation following phacoemulsification surgery, with 4 years follow-up, that did not result in endophthalmitis or low grade chronic uveitis. CASE REPORT: A 79-year-old man with bilateral cataracts underwent phacoemulsification and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation in the right eye. Three months later, he was found to have an eyelash within the right anterior chamber. The patient opted to leave his asymptomatic right eye alone. Four years later, he was referred to our hospital for review of his intraocular foreign body. He had remained asymptomatic with bilateral 6/6 vision, and without pain, photophobia or monocular diplopia. He declined surgery to remove the foreign body and opted for annual review. DISCUSSION: Intraocular implantation of cilia is a rare surgical complication following cataract surgery. The reaction of the eye to cilia has been reported to be variable and unpredictable, varying from absolute lack of reaction to endophthalmitis. Careful preoperative preparation can prevent similar incidents with potential complications. The position of the cilium is an important consideration. In contrast to other organic materials, a cilium is relatively inert and is rarely associated with infection. Acute inflammation most commonly occurs within days or after a few months, although the eye can tolerate the cilium for many years. Some ophthalmologists prefer observation, particularly when there is no inflammation present. We believe that each patient should be considered on an individual basis. The decision to remove an intraocular eyelash remains controversial and should be considered at the onset of inflammatory or infective clinical signs.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = phacoemulsification
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10/11. role of scheimpflug imaging in traumatic intralenticular foreign body.

    PURPOSE: The role of Pentacam Scheimpflug imaging in evaluation of penetrating eye injury and intralenticular foreign body (ILFB). DESIGN: Interventional case report. methods: A 35-year-old male presented to our clinical practice with penetrating eye injury and endophthalmitis. Scheimpflug imaging helped localize the intralenticular foreign body (ILFB). It confirmed the posterior capsule to be intact. He underwent phacoemulsification, foreign body removal, and intraocular lens (IOL) implant. Postoperatively, IOL was imaged with Pentacam Scheimpflug imaging. RESULTS: Scheimpflug imaging allowed us to confirm the presence and exact location of ILFB and its relation to the intact posterior capsule as well as the postoperative IOL positioning. This helped in better planning of management of traumatic cataract with ILFB. CONCLUSIONS: Pentacam is a potential tool for accurate localization of foreign bodies lodged in the lens and provides an objective basis for better patient counseling and surgical planning.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = phacoemulsification
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