Cases reported "Eye Foreign Bodies"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/13. hyphema caused by a metallic intraocular foreign body during magnetic resonance imaging.

    PURPOSE: To report a 63-year-old man with a retained intraocular foreign body who developed a hyphema during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. methods: Case report and review of the current literature on ocular injury caused by intraocular foreign bodies when subjected to an electromagnetic field. RESULTS: Our patient underwent a brain MRI, and the intraocular foreign body caused a hyphema and increased intraocular pressure. The presence and location of the intraocular foreign body were determined by computed tomography (CT). CONCLUSION: magnetic resonance imaging can cause serious ocular injury in patients with ferromagnetic intraocular foreign bodies. This case demonstrates the importance of obtaining an occupational history, and, when indicated, a skull x-ray or CT to rule out intraocular foreign body before an MRI study.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/13. Two remarkable events in the field of intraocular foreign body: (1) The reversal of siderosis bulbi. (2) The spontaneous extrusion of an intraocular copper foreign body.

    Two unusual events concerning intraocular foreign bodies are presented. The first patient had an occult or unsuspected intraocular foreign body. He showed iridoplegia with mydriasis, siderosis iridis, and an intraocular piece of iron lying posteriorly near the retina. The foreign body was removed and the patient regained normal iris color and pupillary activity. His vision remains 20/15 six years postoperatively dispite ensuing retinal detachment one year after removal of the foreign body. The second patient was a young boy injured by a blasting cap explosion. He lost one eye from the injury and had a piece of intraocular brass in his left eye. In spite of the development of chalcosis and a mature cataract the lens gradually shrank in the pupillary space permitting a clear aphakic area and 20/25 vision. The brass fragment migrated forward and inferiorly and was finally extruded under the conjunctiva five years later, where it was removed and chemically analyzed by x-ray diffraction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/13. An unusual intaocular foreign body.

    An unusual foreign body in a 60-year-old man with ocular siderosis is described. A surgical needle was found in the eye after magnetic resonance imaging was performed for cerebral ischemia. As a general precaution in patients who have undergone any kind of surgery, it might be better to perform a plain x-ray before performing magnetic resonance imaging to identify such foreign bodies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/13. Plastic particles at the LASIK interface.

    PURPOSE: To investigate the origin, composition, and persistence of the interface particles that frequently are observed after LASIK. DESIGN: Small case series and experimental animal study. methods: Four patients received LASIK using a Schwind Supratome (Schwind, Kleinostheim, germany) and a MEL 70 G-Scan excimer laser (Asclepion, Jena, germany) and were examined over the course of 1 year using slit-lamp and in vivo confocal microscopy. Four rabbits received a monocular microkeratome incision and were examined immediately after surgery without lifting the flap. After monthly evaluation for 4 months using in vivo confocal microscopy, 2 corneas were processed for histologic analysis and were sectioned serially. To measure the iron content, atomic absorption spectrometry was performed on 2 operated and 2 unoperated rabbit corneas. The chemical composition of the metal and plastic parts of the microkeratome blade was identified using energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (metal part), and Raman and infrared spectroscopy (plastic part). Before and after oscillation in air, the microkeratome blade and motor-head were examined using light and fluorescence microscopy. In serial sections, interface particles were identified by fluorescence microscopy and their chemical composition was determined using Coherent Antistokes Raman Scattering microscopy. RESULTS: In LASIK patients, thousands of brightly reflecting particles (up to 30 micro m) were observed throughout the interface. The highest particle density was detected where the microkeratome blade had first entered the cornea. Both in the center and at the flap edge, the morphologic features, distribution, and density of these particles remained unaltered throughout the 1-year observation period. In rabbit corneas, interface particles were observed immediately after the microkeratome incision, even though the flap had not been lifted. These particles were similar to those observed in humans and persisted unaltered throughout the study. The operated and unoperated rabbit corneas had comparable iron content, demonstrating that the particles were not fragments of the uncoated steel blade. Only a few particles were observed on the unused microkeratome motor head and blade, whereas numerous fluorescent particles were detected after oscillation in air, the amount of particles increasing with oscillation time. Interestingly, the only fluorescent part of the microkeratome was the plastic segment of the blade. This plastic (polyetherimide) emitted fluorescence identical to that of the observed particles, whereas all metal parts of the microkeratome blade and motor head were nonfluorescent. In serial sections, interface particles showed fluorescent properties equivalent to polyetherimide and exhibited molecular resonance at 1780 and 3100 cm(-1), in accordance with the Raman spectrum of polyetherimide. CONCLUSIONS: Numerous plastic particles are generated during microkeratome oscillation and are deposited at the interface during LASIK. The particles persist unaltered for at least 1 year.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/13. Corneal argyrosis associated with silver soldering.

    We report a patient who developed corneal argyrosis secondary to occupational silver soldering. Clinically, the cornea was notable for a green-brown discoloration localized to Descemet's membrane by slit-lamp biomicroscopy. silver particles were identified within the anterior three eighths of Descemet's membrane by light and electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis. To our knowledge, the association between corneal argyrosis and silver soldering has not been previously reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/13. Intraorbital wood. Detection by magnetic resonance imaging.

    The authors present two cases in which intraorbital wooden foreign bodies remained undetected after initial ophthalmologic examination and radiologic investigation which included plain orbital x-rays, orbital computed tomography (CT) scans, and, in one case, orbital ultrasound. In each case, subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a well-delineated low-intensity lesion suggestive of a retained foreign body. Investigation of a case of suspected wooden foreign body in the orbit should include an MRI scan if there is no contraindication, and no foreign body has been defined on CT scan, ultrasound, or plain orbital films.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/13. Occult foreign body simulating a choroidal melanoma with extrascleral extension.

    A 62-year-old man was noted on routine examination to have a dark lesion in the peripheral fundus of the right eye and a corresponding dark scleral mass. The lesion was initially suspected to be a choroidal melanoma with extrascleral extension. The patient denied having ocular trauma. Orbital x-rays and ultrasonography, however, demonstrated the lesion to be an occult transcleral metallic foreign body. An occult foreign body should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a small choroidal or ciliary body melanoma with extrascleral extension.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/13. Detection of orbital and intraocular foreign bodies by computerized tomography.

    Localization of intraocular and orbital foreign bodies with computerized tomography (CT) was evaluated in eight patients and an experimental model. CT examination was particularly helpful in cases with multiple similar foreign bodies and in identifying foreign bodies too radiolucent to be seen by standard skull x-rays. Limitations of CT technique included insufficient resolution to localize a foreign body immediately adjacent to the sclera as either intraocular or extraocular, and obscuration of a small foreign body by artifacts from an adjacent, larger foreign body.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/13. Foreign body masquerading as a ruptured globe.

    Low density orbital foreign bodies may not be detected on plain x-ray. In this case, a large anterior orbital foreign body was seen by examiners, but was misinterpreted as a ruptured globe. This misdiagnosis was supported by conventional x-rays which failed to show the object. It was later easily visualized on CT scan.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/13. Conjunctival synthetic fiber granuloma. A lesion that resembles conjunctivitis nodosa.

    Histopathologic examination of forniceal conjunctival lesions excised from five young patients revealed granulomatous inflammation surrounding filamentous foreign material. Polarization microscopy, special histochemical stains, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray elemental analysis identified the inciting material as predominantly synthetic fabric fiber. Three of these cases initially were diagnosed as conjunctivitis nodosa, an inflammatory reaction to caterpillar setae. Many synthetic fibers contained numerous granules of titanium, barium, or zinc delustering agent, which served to differentiate them from natural fibers or caterpillar hairs. Synthetic fabric fiber is a previously unrecognized cause of conjunctival inflammatory mass lesions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Eye Foreign Bodies'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.