Cases reported "Eye Infections, Bacterial"

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1/22. A case of bacterial endophthalmitis following perforating injury caused by a cat claw.

    A case of bacterial endophthalmitis following a perforating ocular injury caused by a cat claw is reported. The scleral wound was sutured immediately following the injury and systemic antibiotics were administered. Despite this treatment, endophthalmitis occurred 3 days after the injury. The endophthalmitis was resolved by pars plana vitrectomy, however preretinal reproliferation and retinal detachment subsequently occurred. After reoperation the retina was reattached and the corrected visual acuity improved from 10 cm/HM to 20/200. pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected in cultured vitreous humor that was collected during surgery. This case illustrates the possibility of endophthalmitis being caused by gram negative bacillus in cases of perforating injuries caused by animal claws. Perforating ocular injuries caused by animal claws are relatively rare. Here we report a case of endophthalmitis due to pseudomonas aeruginosa that occurred after a perforating injury caused by a cat claw. The eye was treated by pars plana vitrectomy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
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2/22. stenotrophomonas maltophilia endophthalmitis after intraocular lens implantation.

    BACKGROUND: stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an opportunistic, gram-negative bacillus. endophthalmitis induced by S. maltophilia has been described in only two cases after intraocular lens implantation. We report S. maltophilia endophthalmitis in two patients with diabetes mellitus after intraocular lens implantation and compare the characteristics of the S. maltophilia-induced endophthalmitis with two previous cases. methods: A 68-year-old woman and a 74-year-old man with diabetes mellitus developed S. maltophilia endophthalmitis within 5 days of intraocular lens implantation. We performed intraocular lens removal and vitrectomy, which resolved the inflammation. No recurrences were found. RESULTS: Cultures grew S. maltophilia in both cases, and one of the organisms was multi-resistant. The final visual acuity was counting fingers and 0.3. The first case revealed a tractional retinal detachment during vitrectomy. CONCLUSIONS: S. maltophilia is a potential opportunistic intraocular pathogen, and the incidence of multiresistant S. maltophilia is increasing. S. maltophilia causes acute endophthalmitis, and its prognosis may not be poor unless the eye has a history of serious disease before the cataract surgery. The combined procedure of intraocular lens removal and vitrectomy was useful in resolving the inflammation and preventing recurrences.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
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3/22. Mycobacterium interface keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PURPOSE: To report the clinical course, management, and outcome of infectious interface keratitis caused by mycobacterium species after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). DESIGN: A small noncomparative interventional case series. PARTICIPANTS: Five eyes in four patients who underwent LASIK in different locations around the world and had culture-positive mycobacterium keratitis develop. INTERVENTION: The LASIK flap was lifted or amputated, samples were submitted for Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast stain and Lowenstein-Jensen's agar cultures for diagnosis; topical treatment with fortified clarithromycin and amikacin was administered until clinical resolution. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: time periods from onset to diagnosis and from diagnosis to clinical resolution, and the final visual acuity. RESULTS: Onset of symptoms of infection occurred after a mean of 20 days (range, 11 days-6 weeks) after LASIK or an enhancement procedure. Definitive diagnosis was obtained after a mean period of 4.5 weeks (range, 12 days-8 weeks) from onset. keratitis resolved within 8.4 weeks (range, 1-18 weeks) of treatment with fortified clarithromycin and amikacin. Corticosteroids were found to worsen and prolong the course of disease. In four of five eyes the LASIK flap was amputated. CONCLUSIONS: Mycobacterial keratitis is a potentially vision-threatening complication after LASIK, characterized by a long latent period, delayed diagnosis, and a protracted course even under intensive specific antibiotic therapy. Inclusion of specific culture media and staining protocols for mycobacteria, along with aggressive treatment on diagnosis, including lifting or amputating the LASIK flap, culturing, topical fortified clarithromycin and amikacin, while avoiding corticosteroids, may significantly improve resolution of the infection and potentially improve the visual outcome.
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ranking = 3.5326253651171
keywords = mycobacterium
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4/22. Bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis caused by HACEK microorganism.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis caused by a HACEK group organism (actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans). methods: An 85-year-old Caucasian female presented with bilateral light perception visual acuity, anterior chamber cells, hypopyon, posterior synechiae, and no red reflex. RESULTS: The patient underwent bilateral vitrectomy, with topical, intravitreal, and systemic antibiotics. Vitreous cultures revealed gram-negative cocco bacilli consistent with actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. At final follow-up, visual acuity was 20/25 RE and 20/40 LE. CONCLUSIONS: Prompt diagnosis and treatment of HACEK [Hemophilus sp. (parainfluenzae, aphrophilus, paraphrophilus), actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corodens, and kingella kingae] group bacterial endophthalmitis can yield good results.
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ranking = 3
keywords = bacillus
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5/22. Successful treatment of orthodontic-associated traumatic endophthalmitis.

    PURPOSE: To report successful management of orthodontic-associated traumatic endophthalmitis. DESIGN: Interventional case report. methods: A 17-year-old boy developed endophthalmitis after a penetrating corneal injury produced during removal of an orthodontic wire. Treatment included pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with broad-spectrum intravitreal and systemic antibiotics. RESULTS: Clinical endophthalmitis resolved after PPV with injection of intravitreal vancomycin (1 mg) and ceftazidime (2.25 mg), along with oral ciprofloxacin (750 mg twice daily). Microbiologic cultures of intraocular samples produced staphylococcus epidermidis, streptococcus viridans, and lactobacillus species. visual acuity improved to 20/20. CONCLUSIONS: Orthodontic-associated endophthalmitis can involve multiple organisms. It can be successfully treated with current treatment modalities, including PPV, intravitreal antibiotics, and systemic antibiotics.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
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6/22. Postoperative morganella morganii endophthalmitis associated with subclinical urinary tract infection.

    We report a case of morganella morganii acute endophthalmitis following clear corneal phacoemulsification cataract surgery in which a coincident asymptomatic chronic urinary tract infection was detected postoperatively. morganella morganii is a gram-negative bacillus that inhabits the gastrointestinal tract and is part of the normal fecal flora. It is an opportunistic pathogen usually encountered in postoperative and nosocomial settings, causing urinary tract and wound infections. Chronic urinary tract infection may be a risk factor for postoperative endophthalmitis. A dipstick urinalysis before elective cataract surgery in elderly patients with a history of recurrent urinary tract infections may be considered.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
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7/22. Subretinal neovascularization secondary to choroidal septic metastasis from acute bacterial endocarditis.

    The clinical features of an infective embolic choroidopathy are described, from its early onset to late complications in a 45-year-old man with acute staphylococcus aureus endocarditis of the aortic valve. Initial fundus examination revealed, in addition to fresh choroidal lesions, stigmata of a previous embolic episode secondary to endocarditis from actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. The choroidal lesions were extremely asymmetrical, with a clear preference for localization in the left eye. Similar ocular findings were seen in a 78-year-old female with mitral valve prolapse and acute S. aureus endocarditis. In this case, however, choroidal involvement from septic emboli spread was bilateral and roughly symmetrical. Choroidal neovascular membranes arising in scars from choroidal septic emboli occurred in the macular area of the left eye of both patients, 10 months and 5 years after embolization, respectively.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
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8/22. orbital cellulitis caused by eikenella corrodens.

    eikenella corrodens is a gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacillus with specific culture and growth requirements and unusual antibacterial susceptibilities. It has only recently been recognized as a human pathogen. Ocular and adnexal infections with this organism are rare especially in children. We treated two children with orbital cellulitis caused by E. corrodens. One was an 8-year-old boy; the other was an 11-year-old girl. orbital cellulitis in both patients occurred after an upper respiratory tract infection. sinusitis and a subperiosteal abscess were present in both patients. eikenella corrodens and streptococcus viridans were isolated from the boy; E. corrodens was the sole isolate in the girl. Intravenous ampicillin, prolonged hospitalization, and surgical drainage of the orbit were required to control the infection in both patients. eikenella corrodens must be considered in the differential diagnosis of orbital cellulitis in children, and ophthalmologists must become familiar with the characteristics of this peculiar organism.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
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9/22. Atypical mycobacterium keratitis.

    We present two cases of mycobacterium chelonae keratitis, both of which followed minor corneal trauma. One case initially showed improvement with medical therapy alone but eventually required penetrating keratoplasty. The second case required surgical intervention to provide tectonic support, but the infection resolved with antibiotic therapy.
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ranking = 7.0652507302343
keywords = mycobacterium
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10/22. Chronic postoperative endophthalmitis caused by actinomyces neuii.

    Uneventful phacoemulsification with implantation of a foldable, acrylic posterior chamber intraocular lens was performed in the right eye of a 73-year-old white man. Postoperatively, the patient developed a chronic, low-grade intraocular inflammation. Cultures from the aqueous specimen grew actinomyces neuii, an unusual gram-positive bacillus. The low-grade intraocular inflammation persisted with intensive topical steroid-antibiotic medication and systemic antibiotics. A diagnostic, 3-port, pars plana vitrectomy was performed, and aqueous aspirate specimens were sent for culture and sensitivity and to look for abnormal cells. Intracameral antibiotics were not injected. The specimens were sterile to culture, and chronic inflammatory cells were reported on the vitreous specimen. On examination 6 months later, inflammation had not recurred and the best corrected visual acuity was 6/18.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
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