Cases reported "Eye Infections, Parasitic"

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1/8. Orbital dirofilariasis.

    dirofilariasis is a parasitic disease of domestic and wild animals that occasionally may present as zoonotic infection in humans. The microfilariae are accidentally transmitted to humans by culex and aedes mosquitoes. Ophthalmic infections with Dirofilaria are well documented all over the world, including America, europe and australia. The infection may be periorbital, subconjunctival or intraocular. In this report a case is described of orbital dirofilariasis that presented as ptosis and lid swelling. Australian ophthalmologists should consider dirofilariasis as part of the differential diagnosis of orbital swelling and inflammation.
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2/8. Case report: ophthalmomyiasis externa in Dallas County, texas.

    Ophthalmomyiasis externa is an uncommon condition in north america. If not recognized and managed accordingly, it can be complicated by the potentially fatal condition ophthalmomyiasis interna. Ophthalmomyiasis externa is mainly caused by the sheep bot fly Oestrus ovis; thus, it is more common in farming communities. We report a case of ophthalmomyiasis externa in a young woman from Dallas County, texas, who had no known history of contact with farm animals.
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3/8. Three cases of ophthalmomyiasis externa by sheep botfly Oestrus ovis in italy.

    Human infection with the sheep nasal botfly Oestrus ovis is sporadic and is often the consequence of an accidental deposit of the larvae by an adult botfly in the eye. This infestation results in external ophthalmomyiasis that, although a very rare condition, is more common among people living close to farming communities. We report three cases of O. ovis infestation which occurred in italy in a limited area of La Spezia province (Le Cinque Terre), italy during summer 2004. None of the patients had contact with wild or farm animals.
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4/8. gnathostomiasis: a rare nematode infection.

    gnathostoma, primarily an animal nematode, can infect human by the third stage larva by consumption of undercooked or raw fish, poultry, or pork. In bangladesh gnathostomiasis is a very rare condition. The first case, an ocular infection by gnathostoma was reported in 2001 from Rangpur, a northern district. This is the second case report of gnathostomiasis which also is an ocular infection, occurred in an area of greater district of Rangpur. A female patient of 32 year of age of the northern district, Nilphamari has got infected with a species of gnathostoma, manifested by the appearance of a live larva near the right lateral margin of anterior surface of iris of her right eye. The larva was removed surgically from her eye and the patient was cured from symptoms.
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5/8. Subtenons infection by dirofilaria repens.

    Zoonotic filariasis caused by dirofilaria repens, a parasite of carnivores occurs mainly in countries surrounding mediterranean region. The infection occurs in and around eye among animal handlers through vector transmission. We are reporting a case of human dirofilariasis affecting subtenons region in a 63 year-old woman from Coimbatore, South india. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical course and management of ocular dirofilariasis.
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6/8. "Worm in the eye": the rationale for treatment of DUSN in south india.

    AIM: To discuss the rationale for different techniques of treatment for DUSN (diffuse unilateral subacute neuroretinitis) and their effectiveness in two patients from south india. methods: Two rare cases of live worms in DUSN from india are reported, where filarial brugia malayi is endemic. Both cases presented with progressive unilateral loss of vision with no history of animal contact. They were 40 year old, apparently healthy men. In case 1, the worm (1500-2000 microm) was easy to identify with wriggling movements among crisscrossing diffuse subretinal tracks. The worm was destroyed by a single shot of laser to its advancing end, which was followed by oral steroid to control the inflammation caused by the dead worm. In case 2, the worm was small and difficult to identify. Initially diffuse neuroretinitis was diagnosed and treated with intravenous methylprednisolone and oral corticosteroid. A week later, a small live worm (400-600 microm) was found and subsequently destroyed by laser photocoagulation followed by a combination of anthelminthics. RESULTS: The patients' vision had improved to 6/60-6/36 from counting fingers after a few weeks. CONCLUSION: The role of a combination of laser treatment, systemic steroid, and anthelminthics is discussed.
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7/8. Periorbital dirofilariasis.

    A differential diagnosis of inflammatory periocular soft tissue masses includes sarcoidosis, ruptured dermoid cyst, infectious abscess, metastatic neoplastic disease, and idiopathic pseudotumor. The authors present the case of a 42-year-old woman with a periocular inflammatory mass caused by dirofilaria of a nematode classification as Dirofilaria tenuis. The extraction of the worm was curative and the patient has been symptom-free for the ensuing 12 months. This zoonotic infection, spread by mosquito vectors from animal hosts to humans, is rarely encountered in the United States as a cause of periorbital inflammation. A history of migratory swelling and residence in, or travel to, endemic areas (the southeastern united states) should suggest the possibility of Dirofilaria infection.
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8/8. Zoonotic roundworm infections.

    The larval stage of several animal parasites can infect humans and produce severe disease. Visceral and ocular larval migrans caused by the common dog roundworm, toxocara canis, are two well-recognized clinical syndromes. With the wider availability of serodiagnostic tests for toxocaral infection, other syndromes characterized by neuropsychologic deficits, epilepsy, asthma, abdominal distress, and chronic allergy have been described. Treatment with corticosteroids in conjunction with anthelminthic drugs may be life- or sight-saving. Recognition of the risk factors for infection is key to prevention, reinfection, and more serious illness.
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