Cases reported "Eye Infections, Parasitic"

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11/17. Ophthalmomyiasis caused by the sheep bot fly Oestrus ovis in northern iraq.

    myiasis is the feeding of fly larvae on vertebrates. The sheep bot fly larva of Oestrus ovis is a mammalian parasite of the skin, nose, ears, and eyes. When the larvae infest and feed on the structures of the eye, the condition is termed ophthalmomyiasis. Most often this infestation is limited to the external structures of the eye and is referred to as ophthalmomyiasis externa. The features of this condition are severe local inflammation, positive foreign body sensation, erythema, and lacrimation. Vision may or may not be reduced, depending on involvement of the cornea. A 20-year-old white male soldier sought treatment for an inflamed eye and an irritated cornea OS. His eyelids were swollen with marked periorbital edema and conjunctival erythema OS. On slitlamp examination, small whitish organisms were viewed on the conjunctiva OS. The organisms were removed, preserved, and sent to Nova Southeastern University where they were identified as O. ovis first-stage larvae. The patient was treated with antibiotic ointment, and the inflammation resolved within 1 week. O. ovis has a worldwide distribution, and although sheep are the preferred host, humans may also serve as an intermediate host in the organism's life cycle. This case represents one of several reports of ophthalmomyiasis in the middle east caused by O. ovis. U.S. troops stationed in iraq and surrounding areas are vulnerable to eye infestation by fly larvae, and health care providers need to include this condition in their differential diagnosis of anterior segment inflammatory disorders.
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12/17. Ocular parastrongyliasis (=angiostrongyliasis): probable first report of human infection from a patient in Ceylon (sri lanka).

    What is considered to be the first case of human parastrongyliasis (angiostrongyliasis) worldwide is described from a patient in Ceylon (sri lanka) in 1925. It also predates the description of the parasite in humans by Chen (1935).
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13/17. A case of palpebral dirofilariasis.

    PURPOSE: dirofilaria repens infection is the most frequent and widespread dirofilariasis in the world. In italy subcutaneous dirofilariasis is present especially in Northern-Central areas. methods: A woman with a palpebral lump is presented. RESULTS: After subcutaneous and muscular decollement, the authors found and removed a parasite. The final diagnosis was subcutaneous parasitosis due to D. repens. CONCLUSIONS: Surgery was both diagnostic and therapeutic.
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14/17. Two cases of ocular leishmaniasis.

    Two cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis with ocular involvement are presented. The diagnostic difficulty, the possible complications and the importance of a correct diagnosis of such cases is discussed in the light of the cases presented and of previous similar case reports.
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15/17. Ophthalmomyiasis externa due to the sheep botfly Oestrus ovis (diptera: Oestridae) in southwest germany.

    We present a case of ophthalmomyiasis externa in a 54-year-old man in southwest germany (Baden-Wurttemberg). After the patient had been attacked by a fly, he complained of a foreign-body sensation and itching in his right eye and developed purulent conjunctivitis. Slit-lamp examination revealed the presence of translucent, rapidly moving insect larvae in the conjunctival sac and on the corneal surface. Following removal of all larvae and instillation of gentamicin, the symptoms completely resolved within 2 days. Two of the nine larvae removed were examined by light microscopy and taxonomically classified as first-instar larvae of the sheep botfly Oestrus ovis L. 1758. Although this fly is the most common causative agent of external ophthalmomyiasis in the world, infestations in central europe have only rarely been reported. Besides the case report and a detailed description of the larvae, an overview of the literature on European cases of ophthalmomyiasis externa caused by Oestrus ovis is given.
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16/17. Unilateral optic atrophy presumed secondary to schistosomiasis of the optic nerve.

    BACKGROUND: schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease, is endemic in many parts of the world. Schistosomal eggs may be found in almost any organ or tissue in the body, including the eye. The presence of schistosomal eggs in the eye can produce granuloma formation and inflammatory sequelae. methods: A 63-year-old male had contracted schistosomiasis 40 years earlier while on active military service in the philippines. schistosoma japonicum eggs were isolated from his stools and military records indicated that the disease responded well to treatment with antimony potassium tartrate. The patient has gradually lost vision with his left eye over 15 years without the benefit of a complete optometric and medical diagnosis. RESULTS: CT scan suggested the likelihood of "subtle changes in the left optic nerve medially, possibly related to tumor invasion." Further evaluation and coordinated clinical thinking with other eye and medical practitioners led to the suspected diagnosis of schistosomal granuloma in the left optic nerve. In addition, the patient was legally blind from the consequences of glaucoma and its surgical intervention in his fellow eye. CONCLUSIONS: Although over 200 million people are infected with schistosomiasis, the united states is not an area where schistosomiasis is endemic. It is, however, endemic in parts of south america, africa, asia and the Caribbean islands. patients who have been in endemic areas with unexplained ophthalmic findings or systemic findings that could be related to granuloma formation or inflammatory sequelae of disease should have schistosomiasis included in their differential diagnosis.
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17/17. Bilateral ptosis and lower eyelid ectropion secondary to cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    A 73-year-old white woman had a 14-month history of an extensive, disfiguring facial lesion involving the cheeks, nose, and eyelids, resulting in exposure keratopathy. A biopsy of the facial lesion established the diagnosis of cutaneous leishmania, and the lesion responded to treatment with itraconazole.
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