Cases reported "Eye Injuries, Penetrating"

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1/100. siderosis bulbi resulting from an intralenticular foreign body.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of siderosis bulbi that resulted from a small intralenticular foreign body. METHOD: Case report. RESULTS: A 36-year-old man with normal visual acuity and a peripheral intralenticular iron foreign body in the left eye was treated conservatively. Nine weeks after the injury, he had ocular signs of siderosis bulbi, with changes in the electroretinogram. A clear lens aspiration with removal of the foreign body was performed. After removal of the iron foreign body, no progression or regression of the ocular signs of siderosis bulbi has occurred, and the electroretinogram has not changed over a 2-year period. CONCLUSIONS: Even in the presence of good vision, a patient with an intralenticular ferrous foreign body should be followed closely, and the foreign body should be removed before irreversible siderosis bulbi occurs.
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2/100. A case of an intraocular foreign body due to graphite pencil lead complicated by endophthalmitis.

    We report a case of an 8-year-old boy who presented with an intraocular foreign body composed of graphite pencil lead. The patient had been accidentally poked in the right eye with a graphite pencil. Primary care consisted of corneal suturing and lens extraction. Two pieces of the pencil lead remained in the vitreous cavity following surgery, and 2 days later the patient developed endophthalmitis. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed immediately and the intraocular foreign bodies were removed through the scleral wound. Cultures of the vitreous fluid revealed no bacterial organisms. X-ray fluoroscopic analysis of the vitreous detected 1 ppm of aluminum (a constituent of the pencil lead). Although the clinical presentation indicated probable bacterial endophthalmitis, the detection of elemental aluminum within the vitreous cavity also suggested the possibility of further retinal toxicity due to some dissolving of the pencil lead.
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3/100. The importance of CT scans in planning the removal of orbital-frontal lobe foreign bodies.

    PURPOSE: To describe the management of foreign bodies in the orbit and frontal lobe. methods: Reports of two cases. RESULTS: Both patients underwent successful removal of an orbital-cerebral foreign body by anterior orbitotomy. CONCLUSION: Computed tomography was useful to confirm preoperatively that the foreign body was not adjacent to cerebral blood vessels and to monitor postoperatively for cerebral hemorrhage. A team approach is necessary in the management of orbital-frontal lobe foreign bodies.
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4/100. Orbitocranial injury caused by wood.

    A rare case of a patient with orbitocranial injury by a wooden foreign body is reported. Penetrating periorbital wound by a wooden stick with entry site at the right upper eyelid was related to the invasion into the temporal lobe. Fortunately, the anterior and posterior segments of eye were unharmed, but right ocular motility was markedly restricted mechanically in all directions. Forced duction test was strong positive, especially the dextroversion of the right eye. Computed tomography scan showed a well-delineated low density from the orbital wall into the temporal lobe. The wooden foreign body was subsequently removed from the orbit and the temporal lobe, through the neurosurgical frontotemporal approach. After the wooden foreign body was removed, the ocular movement of the right eye fully recovered without any intracranial or ocular complications.
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5/100. hyphema caused by a metallic intraocular foreign body during magnetic resonance imaging.

    PURPOSE: To report a 63-year-old man with a retained intraocular foreign body who developed a hyphema during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. methods: Case report and review of the current literature on ocular injury caused by intraocular foreign bodies when subjected to an electromagnetic field. RESULTS: Our patient underwent a brain MRI, and the intraocular foreign body caused a hyphema and increased intraocular pressure. The presence and location of the intraocular foreign body were determined by computed tomography (CT). CONCLUSION: magnetic resonance imaging can cause serious ocular injury in patients with ferromagnetic intraocular foreign bodies. This case demonstrates the importance of obtaining an occupational history, and, when indicated, a skull x-ray or CT to rule out intraocular foreign body before an MRI study.
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6/100. Sino-orbital foreign body in a child.

    foreign bodies of the sinuses are uncommon. Few reports exist in the English literature. Among these, the frontal and maxillary sinuses are most often involved. Ethmoid and sphenoid foreign bodies are rare and tend to present with chronic symptoms due to delayed diagnosis. We present a case of an acute presentation of a foreign body involving the orbit and ethmoid sinus in a 12-year-old male.
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7/100. Recurrent fungal keratitis and endophthalmitis.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of recurrent fungal sclerokeratitis and endophthalmitis with a very successful outcome due to aggressive combined surgical and medical therapy. To discuss the management of this potentially devastating infection. methods: A 65-year-old man presented with 6 months of left eye redness and irritation after injury from organic matter propelled from an airboat. Initially, he had been treated with foreign body removal, antibiotics, and steroids. He was diagnosed with reactive sclerokeratitis at presentation and was treated with steroids. However, when he did not improve, cultures were obtained and acremonium species filamentous fungi was identified. Despite treatment with appropriate topical and systemic antifungals, his fungal sclerokeratitis progressed to endophthalmitis. Two therapeutic penetrating keratoplasties (PKs) with iridectomy and intraocular amphotericin b were necessary to eradicate the fungal infection. RESULTS: visual acuity was restored to 20/25-3 with correction 9 months after initial presentation. There was no recurrence of fungal infection after the second therapeutic PK. CONCLUSION: The possible reasons for recurrence of fungal infection are discussed. The role of timely and aggressive medical and surgical intervention for fungal sclerokeratitis and endophthalmitis in restoring excellent vision is emphasized.
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8/100. Electroretinographic assessment of early changes in ocular siderosis.

    We examined a patient with an iron intraocular foreign body and recorded electroretinograms (ERGs) before and after the removal of the foreign body by vitrectomy. The amplitudes of the rod and cone ERGs and the oscillatory potentials (OPs) in the injured eye were reduced before the operation. In addition, the photopic on-responses (b wave) were more reduced than off-responses (d wave). One year after surgery, the amplitudes of the rod, cone and photopic on- and off-responses were markedly improved to within the low normal limit. However, the OP amplitudes remained unchanged with lower values. These findings suggest that iron retinotoxicity leads to a dysfunction of all layers but the changes may be reversible in the early period of the disease. The late period iron toxicity produces more severe damage to the inner retina than the outer retina.
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9/100. Intracranial penetrating orbital injury.

    The authors report a case of double-penetrating injury of the globe with intracranial involvement from a pellet gun. A 16-year-old boy had a visual acuity of bare light perception in the left eye after being hit by a pellet. There was an inferior limbal entry site, dense hyphema, and no view of the fundus. Computed tomographic scan showed the pellet intracranially close to the left cavernous sinus. After neurosurgical clearance, the patient underwent primary closure of the corneoscleral entry site followed 3 weeks later by pars plana vitrectomy, lensectomy, and repair of a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. At 12 months postoperatively, visual acuity was 20/300 and the retina was attached. Our case demonstrates the potential for significant visual recovery in some patients with a penetrating orbital injury and intracranial involvement. Complete radiographic evaluation with neurosurgical consultation is important in the management of these patients prior to ophthalmologic intervention with possible foreign body removal. There is a need for more public awareness regarding the potentially harmful effects of pellet guns.
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10/100. Delayed presentation of transorbital intracranial pen.

    A 13 year old Fijian boy sustained a stab wound to the left orbit 3 years ago. It was not appreciated by the treating physicians in fiji that the plastic pen had crossed from the left orbit, through the nose, right orbit and right optic nerve, into the right middle cranial fossa and lodged in the right temporal lobe and that the pen remained in situ for the past 3 years. The boy presented to australia with a discharge from the entry wound in his left lower eyelid. The retained foreign body was not detected on computed tomography imaging, but was detected on subsequent magnetic resonance image. A combined neurosurgery/plastic surgery craniofacial approach was undertaken with successful complete removal of the retained pen, and preservation of vision in his only seeing eye.
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