Cases reported "Eye Injuries, Penetrating"

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1/6. Ocular injury caused by an air bag for a driver wearing eyeglasses.

    BACKGROUND: Although air bags have been shown to reduce the number of fatalities and serious injuries caused by motor vehicle accidents, there have been many reports of air bag-related ocular injuries. We recently treated air bag-related corneal laceration in a patient wearing eyeglasses at the time of a motor accident. CASE: A 38-year-old Japanese man was driving a car at approximately 40 km per hour when he struck a stopped 2-ton truck. He was wearing a three-point lap-shoulder seat belt. At impact, the driver's-side air bag deployed and struck the man on the left side of his face. He was wearing eyeglasses with glass lenses, and the air bag broke the left lens of his eyeglasses, and glass fragments lacerated his cornea. OBSERVATIONS: External examination showed multiple superficial abrasions of the skin and ecchymosis of the left side of his face. Slit-lamp examination of his left eye showed corneal laceration and hyphema. The lens had opacities and was covered with fibrin membrane. Repair of the corneal laceration and phacoemulsification of the lens were performed. Six months later, his best corrected visual acuity was 20/20 in the left eye. CONCLUSIONS: As cars are increasingly equipped with air bags, reports of air bag-related eye injuries have increased. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of corneal laceration caused by a shattered lens in an air bag-related injury. Ophthalmologists should caution patients about the danger of eye injuries in air bag-equipped cars, and thought should be given to improving the materials for eyeglasses.
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2/6. Combined cataract extraction and submacular blood clot evacuation for globe perforation caused by retrobulbar injection.

    A 45-year-old woman, originally scheduled for cataract surgery in the left eye, was referred for management of a globe perforation noticed after the retrobulbar injection of an anesthetic solution. There was a moderate degree of vitreous hemorrhage, and initial visual acuity was hand movement. A submacular blood clot of about 4-disc diameter was detected when the vitreous hemorrhage gradually cleared. One week after the incident, combined phacoemulsification, intraocular lens implantation, pars plana vitrectomy, and submacular clot removal using tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) as an adjunct were performed. Recovery was uneventful. At the last follow-up 6 months after surgery, best corrected visual acuity was 20/30.
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keywords = phacoemulsification
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3/6. Traumatic cataract and intralenticular foreign body.

    Traumatic cataracts resulting from penetrating injuries occur most frequently from projectile metallic foreign bodies. The majority of intraocular foreign bodies cause sight-threatening damage including traumatic cataract in up to 25% of the cases. A case of traumatic cataract and retained intralenticular foreign body that was removed successfully with phacoemulsification and foldable intraocular lens implantation in the capsular bag is described. This case report highlights the benefit in planning surgical management as a two-staged procedure after appropriate investigations.
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keywords = phacoemulsification
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4/6. Intralenticular intraocular foreign body after stone impact: CT and US findings.

    Introduction: Intraocular foreign body (IOFB) is a relatively common entity in emergency departments worldwide. Appropriate ocular assessment is mandatory if an intraocular foreign body is suspected because it is associated with an increased risk of endophtalmitis and a wide range of complications including hyphaema, cataract, vitreous hemorrhage, and retinal tears and detachment. Case report: We present a case of intralenticular intraocular foreign body after stone impact. Discussion: ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) show an accurate location of the foreign body inside the lens. This finding enabled the surgeon to perform a phacoemulsification lens extraction with removal of the foreign body, the optimal method of removing intralenticular IOFB. To our knowledge, this is the first US and CT imaging report.
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keywords = phacoemulsification
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5/6. role of scheimpflug imaging in traumatic intralenticular foreign body.

    PURPOSE: The role of Pentacam Scheimpflug imaging in evaluation of penetrating eye injury and intralenticular foreign body (ILFB). DESIGN: Interventional case report. methods: A 35-year-old male presented to our clinical practice with penetrating eye injury and endophthalmitis. Scheimpflug imaging helped localize the intralenticular foreign body (ILFB). It confirmed the posterior capsule to be intact. He underwent phacoemulsification, foreign body removal, and intraocular lens (IOL) implant. Postoperatively, IOL was imaged with Pentacam Scheimpflug imaging. RESULTS: Scheimpflug imaging allowed us to confirm the presence and exact location of ILFB and its relation to the intact posterior capsule as well as the postoperative IOL positioning. This helped in better planning of management of traumatic cataract with ILFB. CONCLUSIONS: Pentacam is a potential tool for accurate localization of foreign bodies lodged in the lens and provides an objective basis for better patient counseling and surgical planning.
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keywords = phacoemulsification
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6/6. Intralenticular metallic foreign body.

    BACKGROUND: Intralenticular metallic foreign bodies may be well tolerated for many years. CASE REPORT: A 24-year-old caucasian man was referred with an intralenticular metallic foreign body present in the left eye for five days. Following initial treatment with topical steroid and antibiotic, the lens remained clear and visual acuity normal. Two years later the left eye developed an anterior uveitis, with reduced vision. A left phacoemulsification lens extraction with removal of the intralenticular foreign body and insertion of a posterior chamber intraocular lens was performed. CONCLUSION: Management of intralenticular metallic foreign bodies may be conservative till intraocular inflammation or cataract develops.
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keywords = phacoemulsification
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