Cases reported "Eye Injuries"

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1/53. Choroidal rupture associated with forceps delivery.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of choroidal rupture associated with forceps delivery. METHOD: Case report. RESULTS: We examined a 4-year-old boy with a history of a retinal scar in the right eye. The child was delivered with forceps and had bitemporal ecchymoses at birth. There was no other history of trauma. Ophthalmoscopic examination of the right eye with a vision of counting fingers revealed linear scars from choroidal rupture in the posterior pole, including one through the macula. Anterior segment examination was normal. Examination of the left eye was completely normal. CONCLUSION: Ocular trauma associated with forceps delivery may rarely result in choroidal ruptures, even in the absence of external signs of injury, such as breaks in descemet membrane.
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ranking = 1
keywords = membrane
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2/53. Retinal pigment epithelial tear and extensive exudative retinal detachment following blunt trauma.

    BACKGROUND: A peripheral retinal pigment epithelial tear and an extensive exudative retinal detachment caused by choroidal leakage from the denuded Bruch's membrane are extremely rare. A peripheral retinal pigment epithelial tear has not been reported in an eye with retinochoroidal folds after blunt ocular trauma. methods: Case report. RESULTS: The course of a large nasal peripheral retinal pigment epithelial tear that occurred after blunt ocular trauma in a patient with retinochoroidal folds was followed. The inferior retinal detachment caused by leakage from the denuded Bruch's membrane following the development of the tear gradually worsened. Initial treatment with cryotherapy was ineffective, but the retinal detachment eventually resolved after the patient underwent sclerectomy and sclerostomy. CONCLUSION: A large peripheral retinal pigment epithelial tear can occur in patients with retinochoroidal folds following blunt ocular trauma, and extensive retinal detachment can be induced. Sclerectomy and sclerostomy can be beneficial in patients with an extensive exudative retinal detachment caused by choroidal leakage from the denuded Bruch's membrane.
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ranking = 3
keywords = membrane
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3/53. Triangular transchamber suture.

    A 64-year-old woman with a fibrous membrane at the lens plane after traumatic loss of all the iris and massive intraocular hemorrhage had posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL) implantation anterior to the fibrous membrane with a triangular transchamber suture to prevent possible PCIOL-corneal touch and enhance the stability of the PCIOL. After 3 years, the PCIOL remained in a good position and visual rehabilitation was satisfactory and without complications.
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ranking = 2
keywords = membrane
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4/53. A traumatic macular hole secondary to a high-energy Nd:YAG laser.

    A case is reported of a traumatic macular hole caused by a high-energy Nd:YAG laser. The initial ocular examination revealed an explosive, crater-shaped, full-thickness macular hole surrounded by local edema and detachment. By the 12th day after the injury, the hole had shrunk progressively and was covered by a thin fibrin-like membrane. A thick epiretinal membrane covered the injured area 1 month after the injury. Nine months after the injury, the macular hole closed spontaneously with a partially detached epiretinal membrane. This case demonstrates one of the natural healing processes of a traumatic macular hole. Although the hole finally closed, the patient did not regain his vision because of the severe damage to the photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium, and choroid.
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ranking = 127.36606540739
keywords = epiretinal membrane, epiretinal, membrane
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5/53. Complications of ocular paintball injuries in children.

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the ocular complications of paintball injuries in children. methods: The clinical course of four children with traumatic ocular paintball injuries was evaluated. All patients underwent a complete ocular examination. Their age, injuries sustained, surgical procedure(s) performed, presence of protective eyewear at the time of injury, and final visual outcome was assessed. The presence of directly related anterior and posterior segment abnormalities were also evaluated. RESULTS: Four boys sustained traumatic paintball injuries. Average patient age was 11.25 years (range: 10-12 years). None of the children were wearing ocular or facial protection at the time of the initial injury. All patients had hyphema and traumatic cataract, and some form of retinal pathology (vitreous hemorrhage, epiretinal membrane, retinal hemorrhage, and choroidal rupture). One child had a partial-thickness corneal laceration that did not require surgical intervention. All other patients underwent ophthalmic surgery. Final visual acuity was 20/30 or better in two patients, and 20/100 or worse in the others. The cause of decreased visual acuity in these children was directly related to macular pathology. CONCLUSION: Ocular injuries resulting from paintball impact are often severe and usually occur when the participants are not wearing eye protection or this protection becomes dislodged. Treatment of these injuries is sometimes limited to an attempt to salvage what remains of useful vision. Unfortunately, most of these sports-related injuries could have been prevented if patients wore adequate eye protection when involved in this sport.
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ranking = 63.183032703697
keywords = epiretinal membrane, epiretinal, membrane
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6/53. Multifocal corneal argyrosis after an explosion injury.

    PURPOSE: To document the clinical and histopathologic corneal features of a patient who developed multifocal corneal argyrosis after a chemical explosion injury with unusual involvement of the corneal stroma and keratocytes. methods: The corneal button was investigated by light and transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis. RESULTS: Clinically, the patient showed dark discoloration of the lids, periocular skin, episclera, and conjunctiva and had multiple brown dots in the superficial layers of the cornea. Microscopic examination of the cornea showed diffuse deposition of silver particles in the epithelial basement membrane, Bowman's layer, and Descemet's membrane. In the corneal stroma, silver granules accumulated intracellularly within lysosomal structures of degenerative keratocytes and extracellularly in association with collagen fibers and cellular debris. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis showed peaks of silver and sulfur. CONCLUSION: The toxic influence of intracellular accumulation of silver in stromal keratocytes may lead to cell damage and necrosis and result in visual impairment.
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ranking = 2
keywords = membrane
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7/53. Hemorrhagic Descemet's membrane detachment as a complication of deep sclerectomy: a case report.

    PURPOSE: To report a case that developed hemorrhagic Descemet's membrane detachment after deep sclerectomy. PATIENT AND methods: Case report. A 63-year-old diabetic patient suffering from uncontrolled chronic open-angle glaucoma with full medication, underwent an uneventful deep sclerectomy operation combined with intraoperative mitomycin-C. RESULTS: On the second postoperative day, a hemorrhagic Descemet's membrane detachment (HDDM) was observed. The hemorrhage showed rapid absorption rate during the first two weeks along with reduction of the HDDM. After this period of time the rate of blood absorption was decreased. The Descemet's membrane reattached completely six months after surgery without any intervention but a paracentral corneal scar was present. The bleb was not functionally impaired during the whole postoperative period, and intraocular pressure remained stable at the level between 12 and 15 mmHg without medication. CONCLUSION: Hemorrhagic Descemet's membrane detachment should be considered as a potential complication of deep sclerectomy.
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ranking = 8
keywords = membrane
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8/53. The vitrophage in ocular trauma. Report of 15 cases.

    Fifteen patients underwent a pars plana approach vitrectomy and membranectomy after acute and chronic injury. In all cases the lens fragments, hemorrhage, and secondary membranes were removed restoring clarity to the ocular media. In two cases the final visual acuity was limited by preexisting retinal injury. The advantages of pars plana approach are the small incision and minimal ocular manipulation during surgery. In the presence of retinal injury, diathermy during the procedure or photocoagulation within 24 hours is also indicated.
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ranking = 2
keywords = membrane
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9/53. Spontaneous closure of traumatic macular hole.

    PURPOSE: To report eight cases of spontaneous closure of traumatic macular hole. DESIGN : Consecutive observational case series. patients AND methods: In a consecutive series of 18 eyes of 18 patients with traumatic macular hole, eight patients achieved spontaneous closure of traumatic macular hole. Clinical records of the eight eyes of eight patients were reviewed, together with the results of optical coherence tomography performed in three eyes. RESULTS: All eight patients with spontaneous closure of traumatic macular hole were males, with a mean age of 14.6 years (range, 11-21 years). The major cause of blunt trauma was sports-related accidents. Six eyes developed visual symptoms immediately after trauma and two eyes 10 to 12 days later. In all eight eyes, contact lens biomicroscopy revealed a small, full-thickness macular hole not complicated by epiretinal membrane, cuff of subretinal fluid, or posterior vitreous detachment. The macular hole closed spontaneously 1 week to 4 months after trauma. All eight eyes had visual acuity improvement with the final best-corrected visual acuity of 0.5 or better in four (50%) eyes. Optical coherence tomography in three eyes revealed two distinct abnormalities. Two eyes presented with acute foveal dehiscence without involvement of the posterior vitreous cortex. The remaining eye showed at presentation perifoveal vitreous detachment with residual vitreous adhesion to the edge of updrawn fovea and developed release of the vitreofoveal adhesion at the time of hole closure. CONCLUSIONS: Spontaneous closure of traumatic macular hole is not uncommon. An observation for a period of up to four months may be a management of choice for traumatic macular hole. There may be clinically and pathogenetically two distinct mechanisms of traumatic macular formation; one type that causes immediate visual loss due to primary dehiscence of the fovea, and the other type that leads to delayed visual loss due to dehiscence of the fovea secondary to persistent vitreofoveal adhesion.
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ranking = 63.183032703697
keywords = epiretinal membrane, epiretinal, membrane
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10/53. Vitreous surgery combined with internal limiting membrane peeling for traumatic macular hole with severe retinal folds.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of a traumatic macular hole with severe retinal folds in which vitreous surgery combined with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling was beneficial. To demonstrate that the area from which the ILM was peeled can be clearly differentiated by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. methods: A posterior hyaloid detachment was created during vitreous surgery on a 34 year old man with a traumatic macular hole. The remaining vitreous was resected and the ILM was peeled. The fundus was examined through a scanning laser ophthalmoscope before and after the surgery. RESULTS: The retinal folds disappeared concurrently with the detachment of the ILM, resulting in closure of the macular hole. The area from which the ILM was peeled was clearly observed through the scanning laser ophthalmoscope. CONCLUSION: In this patient, it was helpful to perform not only posterior hyaloid detachment but also ILM peeling. The scanning laser ophthalmoscope was highly useful for observing the area from which the ILM was peeled.
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ranking = 5
keywords = membrane
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