Cases reported "Eye Injuries"

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1/111. Epikeratoplasty for traumatic corneal ectasia.

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy of epikeratoplasty in a case of traumatic corneal ectasia. METHOD: Epikeratoplasty using a manually dissected donor lenticule was used to treat traumatic corneal ectasia after an iron nail injury. RESULT: No intra- or postoperative complication was encountered. At the end of 6 months' follow-up, the patient's best corrected visual acuity was 6/12. CONCLUSION: Epikeratoplasty is a useful technique to treat traumatic corneal ectasia.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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2/111. Repair of orbital floor fractures with hydroxyapatite block scaffolding.

    PURPOSE: To determine the efficacy of using a scaffold of hydroxyapatite blocks within the maxillary sinus to treat patients with large orbital floor fractures and secondary vertical globe dystopia. methods: Case series of five patients. Hydroxyapatite blocks were stacked within the maxillary antrum to support the reconstructed orbital floor. RESULTS: All patients had good results, though mild residual enophthalmos persisted in three patients. The orbital floor implants and globe positions remained stable during follow-up intervals ranging from 46 to 65 months. No adverse postoperative complications, such as sinusitis, developed. CONCLUSIONS: Hydroxyapatite block scaffolding is a useful alternative to metallic floor implants and autologous bone grafts in the reconstruction of large traumatic orbital floor defects associated with vertical globe dystopia.
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keywords = operative
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3/111. Management of traumatic cyclodialysis cleft associated with ocular hypotony.

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of direct cyclopexy for treatment of traumatic cyclodialysis cleft associated with ocular hypotony. patients AND methods: Eyes with traumatic cyclodialysis cleft were treated with direct cyclopexy or 1.0% atropine eyedrop. RESULTS: Five eyes with a large cyclodialysis cleft were treated with direct cyclopexy. Postoperatively, these eyes obtained normal intraocular pressure. Four of the 5 eyes had good visual acuity, and 1 eye that had preoperative subretinal hemorrhage in the macula had poor visual acuity. Of the 3 eyes treated with 1.0% atropine eyedrops, 1 had good visual acuity, and 2 with retinal folds had fairly good and poor visual acuity. CONCLUSION: The present study showed that direct cyclopexy is useful for the treatment of traumatic cyclodialysis cleft associated with ocular hypotony, and that the cyclodialysis should be surgically treated before irreversible retinal folds develop.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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4/111. An unusual complication of retinal reattachment surgery.

    The authors report a case with an unusual late extraocular complication of scleral buckling and local silicone sponge implant. Four years after the reattachment surgery, a ptotic upper eyelid perforated by local silicone sponge implant and fistula between upper eyelid and sclera were detected. Primary repair of upper eyelid and removal of silicone sponge were performed. One year later, the retina was attached and there was no problem with the upper eyelid. cryotherapy, episcleral explant (scleral buckling), and local implant (sponge) are frequently used and effective methods for retinal reattachment surgery. Postoperative early and late complications have been reported. To our knowledge, there is no report of upper eyelid perforation, ptosis and fistula formation caused by silicone sponge implant rejection.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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5/111. Posterior chamber intraocular lens dislocation with the bag.

    We report a rare case of a 46-year-old man presenting with a luxation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL) with the capsular bag after ocular contusion. Preoperative axial length was 36.58 mm. After trauma, pars plana extraction of the dislocated IOL inside the capsular bag was performed using a forceps. Capsular fibrosis had probably weakened the zonules, which were ruptured by the trauma. This observation confirms the necessity of a large continuous curvilinear capsulotomy and meticulous cleaning of the anterior and posterior capsules to minimize postsurgical fibrosis and capsule contraction.
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keywords = operative
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6/111. Traumatic subconjunctival dislocation of the crystalline lens and its surgical management.

    The authors report a case of a 40-year-old female who had sustained a blunt ocular trauma resulting in anterior scleral rupture and subconjunctival dislocation of the crystalline lens. Anterior segment ultrasound aided in the diagnosis. Surgical exploration revealed a 6 mm long anterior scleral rupture which was repaired. Postoperatively the patient had a best corrected visual acuity of 6/18.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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7/111. Giant retinal tears resulting from eye gouging in rugby football.

    A 29 year old myopic man sustained two separate giant retinal tears in his right eye following deliberate eye gouging during a rugby tackle. These were successfully repaired by vitrectomy and intraocular silicone oil injection. Although the postoperative course was complicated by pupil block glaucoma, he regained corrected visual acuity of 6/5 after oil removal. This injury highlights the potentially sight threatening nature of this type of rugby injury and the importance of early referral for specialist treatment.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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8/111. Internal orbital fractures in the pediatric age group: characterization and management.

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the specific characteristics and management of internal orbital fractures in the pediatric population. DESIGN: Retrospective observational case series. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-four pediatric patients between the ages of 1 and 18 years with internal orbital ("blowout") fractures. methods: Records of pediatric patients presenting with internal orbital fractures over a 5-year period were reviewed, including detailed preoperative and postoperative evaluations, surgical management, and medical management. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Ocular motility restriction, enophthalmos, nausea and vomiting, and postoperative complications. RESULTS: Floor fractures were by far the most common fracture type (71%). Eleven of 34 patients required surgical intervention for ocular motility restriction. Eight were trapdoor-type fractures with soft-tissue incarceration; five had nausea and vomiting. Early surgical intervention (<2 weeks) resulted in a more complete return of ocular motility compared with the late intervention group. CONCLUSIONS: Trapdoor-type fractures, usually involving the orbital floor, are common in the pediatric age group. These fractures may be small with minimal soft-tissue incarceration, making the findings on computed tomography scans quite subtle at times. Marked motility restriction and nausea/vomiting should alert the physician to the possibility of a trapdoor-type fracture and the need for prompt surgical intervention.
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ranking = 3
keywords = operative
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9/111. Surgical treatment of penetrating orbito-cranial injuries. Case report.

    Penetrating orbital injuries are not frequent but neither are they rare. The various diagnostic and therapeutic problems are related to the nature of the penetrating object, its velocity, shape and size as well as the possibility that it may be partially or wholly retained within the orbit. The authors present another case with unusual characteristics and discuss the strategies available for the best possible treatment of this traumatic pathology in the light of the published data. The patient in this case was a young man involved in a road accident who presented orbito-cerebral penetration caused by a metal rod with a protective plastic cap. Following the accident, the plastic cap (2.5x2 cm) was partially retained in the orbit. At initial clinical examination, damage appeared to be exclusively ophthalmological. Subsequent CT scan demonstrated the degree of intracerebral involvement. The damaged cerebral tissue was removed together with bone fragments via a bifrontal craniotomy, the foreign body was extracted and the dura repaired. Postoperative recovery was normal and there were no neuro-ophthalmological deficits at long-term clinical assessment. Orbito-cranial penetration, which is generally associated with violent injuries caused by high-velocity missiles, may not be suspected in traumas produced by low-velocity objects. Diagnostic orientation largely depends on precise knowledge of the traumatic event and the object responsible. When penetration is suspected and/or the object responsible is inadequately identified, a CT scan is indicated. The type of procedure to adopt for extraction, depends on the size and nature of the retained object. Although the possibility of non-surgical extraction has been described, surgical removal is the safest form of treatment in cases with extensive laceration and brain contusion.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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10/111. Unilateral blindness as a complication of intraoperative positioning for cervical spinal surgery.

    The authors report a case of unilateral blindness after surgical vertebral stabilization for C5-C6 subluxation. The blindness resulted from ischemia of the retina caused by prolonged compression of the eyeball on the surgical bed. This injury can be serious and irreversible, so it must be prevented by placing the patient in the proper position. The anesthetist must pay particular attention to avoid the consequences of possible intraoperative movement.
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ranking = 5
keywords = operative
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