Cases reported "Eyelid Diseases"

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1/8. South American cutaneous leishmaniasis of the eyelids: report of five cases in Rio de Janeiro State, brazil.

    PURPOSE: To describe American cutaneous leishmaniasis of the eyelids and highlight the main clinical and diagnostic features of lesions, which are rare in this location. DESIGN: Retrospective, noncomparative case series methods: Leishmanin skin test, touch preparations, histopathologic analysis, and culture in appropriate media were used for clinical confirmation and parasitologic diagnosis. Positive cultures were identified by the iso-enzymes technique. All patients were treated with pentavalent antimony applied intramuscularly. RESULTS: Leishmanin skin test was positive in all five patients. touch preparations, histopathologic analysis, and culture were performed in four patients. touch preparations were positive (presence of Leishman's bodies) in two patients; histopathologic analysis showed a granulomatous infiltrate in four patients and parasite was present in two patients; culture was positive in three patients, and in two the parasite was identified as Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis. Therapy was effective for all patients. CONCLUSIONS: Cutaneous leishmaniasis of the eyelids is uncommon in the americas. The disease may present diagnostic difficulties when appearing in nonendemic areas. The clues for diagnosis are the clinical aspect of lesions, the epidemiologic data, and a positive Leishmanin skin test. Demonstration of parasite is not always possible. Pentavalent antimonial compounds are the therapy of choice. Formerly, transmission of leishmaniasis occurred only when humans penetrated forested areas and became an incidental host. Now, eyelid lesions are part of the changing pattern in the transmission of the disease. With the increase in ecotourism, these lesions may begin to be seen in air travelers returning to other parts of the world.
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ranking = 1
keywords = leishmaniasis
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2/8. Successful treatment of ocular leishmaniasis.

    PURPOSE: To report successful treatment of a case of ocular leishmaniasis with combined stibogluconate and allupurinol. METHOD: A 32-year-old physician developed a non-tender reddish chalazion like lesion in his right lower lid, associated with conjunctivitis and nodular episcleritis. biopsy of the lesion in his eyelid and conjunctiva disclosed a dense inflammatory response including histiocytes containing typical leishmania organisms. RESULT: Therapy with stibogluconate, both intralesional and intramuscular, was initiated with some improvement. However recurrence of the lesion occurred. Systemic retreatment with combined stibogluconate and allupurinol led to complete healing of the lesion. CONCLUSION: Ocular leishmaniasis is a rare and potentially blinding disorder. Combined stibogluconate and allupurinol may be an effective therapy in such cases.
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ranking = 0.85714285714286
keywords = leishmaniasis
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3/8. Ocular leishmaniasis: a case report.

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a protozoal disease which is endemic in iran usually caused by leishmaniasis major and leishmaniasis tropica and transmitted by the bite of a sandfly. In Isfahan province CL is highly prevalent and we observe some unusual clinical features of disease. The eyelid is rarely involved possibly because the movement of the lids prevents the fly vector from biting the skin in this region. We report a case of ocular leishmaniasis with eyelid and conjunctival involvement that had simulated chalazion and was complicated with trichiasis. The patient was diagnosed by direct smear, culture, and PCR from the lesions. He was treated with systemic sodium stibogluconate (20 mg/kg/day) for 20 days and subsequently surgery for trichiasis. The patient was clinically cured with this treatment, however the disease had left complications, including palpebral and conjanctival scaring, corneal opacity, and eyelash loss.
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ranking = 0.85714285714286
keywords = leishmaniasis
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4/8. Old World eyelid cutaneous leishmaniasis: a case report.

    Leishmania is a protozoa that may infect the skin, mucous, and viscera. The geographical distribution of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is mainly determined by the sandfly vectors. The Old World type is mainly attributed to leishmania major and leishmania tropica, and in South of europe only to leishmania infantum. A 63-year-old woman, who noted a pimple on the external third of the left upper eyelid 6 months before. The lesion was nodular, well-defined and measured 1.1 cm in diameter and in height, simulating a basal cell carcinoma. It was surgically excised. CL diagnosis was made upon the histologic examination, which showed histiocytes with intracellular leishmania organisms. At 2 years followup, no evidence exists of cutaneous, mucous, or visceral involvement. Apart from carcinomas, nodular lesions with central ulceration are rare on the eyelid. A single cutaneous lesion of leishmania (oriental sore) has to be considered in the differential diagnosis, along with malignant eyelid neoplasms.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = leishmaniasis
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5/8. Eyelid leishmaniasis in a patient with neurogenic ptosis.

    A patient with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia contracted cutaneous leishmaniasis of the upper eyelid. infection of this site is rare because eyelid movements usually prevent the sandfly vector from biting the skin there. It is postulated that the relative immobility of the upper eyelid in this patient was a major predisposing factor for the infection.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = leishmaniasis
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6/8. Bilateral cutaneous leishmaniasis of upper eyelids: a case report.

    An 11-year-old girl presented with a 6-month history of bilateral upper eyelid erythema, induration, and blepharitis resistant to conventional antibiotic therapy. The lesions gradually progressed to symmetrical ulcerative nodules within 3 months. Cutaneous smear and biopsy revealed numerous amastigotes in macrophage cells. Therapy with systemic pentavalent antimonial resulted in successful healing of lesions. We conclude that cutaneous leishmaniasis must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of bilateral chronic eyelid swelling in endemic regions of the world.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = leishmaniasis
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7/8. Two cases of ocular leishmaniasis.

    Two cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis with ocular involvement are presented. The diagnostic difficulty, the possible complications and the importance of a correct diagnosis of such cases is discussed in the light of the cases presented and of previous similar case reports.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = leishmaniasis
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8/8. Cutaneous leishmaniasis (oriental sore) of the eyelid.

    A 45-year-old American residing along the basin of the mediterranean sea developed a cutaneous lesion involving his right lower eyelid. He returned to the united states several months after it first appeared and sought treatment. On clinical examination the lesion was regarded as either a tumor or a cyst. It was excised, and on pathological examination a chronic granulomatous inflammatory lesion, containing innumerable Leishman-Donovan bodies, was found.
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ranking = 0.57142857142857
keywords = leishmaniasis
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