Cases reported "Facial Asymmetry"

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1/26. Segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia: a case report and review of the literature.

    Segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia (SOD) is a rare, unilateral developmental disorder of the maxilla involving abnormal growth and maturation of the bone, lack of one or both premolars, altered primary molar structure, delayed tooth eruption, and fibrous hyperplasia of the gingiva. In this, the twenty-third reported case of SOD, the literature is reviewed, and the clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic data are described. Computed tomographic scans of this case showed that the involved segment of the maxilla extends mesiodistally from the permanent cuspid to the mesial portion of the first permanent molar, largely limited to the area of the missing premolars. However, the affected bone extends superiorly in the lateral wall of the maxilla to the zygoma and base of the orbit. This article is intended to serve as baseline data for a future article, describing the natural history and possible treatment of SOD, which remain undocumented.
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keywords = tooth, eruption
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2/26. Orofacial findings in the Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome.

    The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a triad of congenital anomalies characterised by haemangiomas, varicosities, and unilateral bony and soft tissue hypertrophy. hypertrophy usually affects one distal limb, but trunk or face may be affected. Cutaneous haemangiomas (nevus flammeus) of varying extent and irregular contour are often present in the hypertrophic regions. Varicosities may also be part of the vascular lesions of the syndrome. Orofacial manifestations include facial asymmetry, jaw enlargement, and malocclusions as well as premature tooth eruption. Two cases of the Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome are presented here. Both of these show the typical hemifacial hypertrophy and premature eruption of teeth on the affected side. In the first case only the left mandibular region was affected. In contrast, in the second there was hypertrophy of the whole left side of the body including upper and lower jaws. This boy also suffers from congenital ideokinetic retardation, while the first was otherwise normal. Both cases differ from previously reported cases of the Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome in lacking any prominent facial nevus flammeus. In the first case there was also malformation of the crown of the first permanent molar on the affected side that has not been described previously.
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ranking = 1.0672987537692
keywords = tooth, eruption
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3/26. Idiopathic noncondylar hemimandibular hyperplasia.

    A female patient with 'idiopathic non-condylar hemimandibular hyperplasia' was followed from the age of 7.5-11.5 years. This rare disorder was characterised by an increase in volume of the right inferior ramus and mandibular body. It also included accelerated development and eruption of the teeth on the affected side, but no indication of enlargement of the condyle or the condylar neck. To date, review of the literature revealed several cases of hemimandibular hyperplasia and unilateral condylar hyperplasia, both of which present with enlargement of the condyle. However, the patient differed significantly from any previously reported cases, since she had no enlargement of the condyle. The above mentioned patient also differed from patients with hemihypertrophy, since the teeth were accelerated in development, but not hyperplastic. In addition, from histopathologic and radiographic examinations, as well as an angiogram, benign fibro-osseous and vascular lesions of the mandible were excluded. Although this is a single case report and neither the aetiology nor the pathogenesis is yet understood, it may suggest a new disorder of the mandible. Therefore, future reporting of similar cases should be encouraged.
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ranking = 0.067298753769168
keywords = eruption
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4/26. Endoscopic removal of an ectopic third molar obstructing the osteomeatal complex.

    We report a rare case of an ectopic third molar at the level of the osteomeatal complex. A 21-year-old man came to us with a left-sided nasal obstruction of 2 years' duration. Computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses revealed that an aberrant tooth was obstructing the osteomeatal complex and bulging into the ethmoid infundibulum. Opacity of the entire left maxillary sinus indicated the presence of an associated cystic formation. A transnasal endoscopic sinus technique was employed to create a large middle meatal antrostomy and to remove the tooth as well as the cystic contents and cyst wall. Pathologic analysis revealed that the cyst was dentigerous. After recovery from surgery, the patient resumed nasal breathing. The endoscopic surgical approach used in this case caused less morbidity than do the more common methods (e.g., the Caldwell-Luc procedure) of removing ectopic teeth from the sinus.
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ranking = 1.8654024924617
keywords = tooth
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5/26. Craniofacial and dental manifestations of proteus syndrome: a case report.

    The proteus syndrome is a rare congenital hamartomatous condition that is characterized by a wide range of malformations, sometimes involving the face. Common manifestations include partial gigantism, congenital lipomas, and plantar hyperplasia. In this report we describe the craniofacial clinicopathological development in a girl with proteus syndrome from age 6 to 20 years. The patient had pronounced hemifacial hypertrophy, exostoses in the left parietal region, and enlargement of the inferior alveolar nerve and mandibular canal in the affected region. The dental development of the affected left mandible and maxilla was characterized by extremely premature development and eruption of the primary and permanent teeth and by pronounced idiopathic root resorptions. The multidisciplinary management of the patient and the treatment outcome is reported. A review of the Proteus patients in the literature who exhibited manifestation in the craniofacial region is presented.
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ranking = 0.067298753769168
keywords = eruption
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6/26. Odontomas--report of 3 cases.

    Three clinical cases of odontoma were detected in 2 children and 1 adolescent. The tumors were surgically removed. Clinical suspicion was based on facial deformity in one of the cases and on the absence of permanent tooth eruption in the other two. Radiographic evidence of odontoma was confirmed through histological study.
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keywords = tooth, eruption
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7/26. facial asymmetry case with multiple missing teeth treated by molar autotransplantation and orthognathic surgery.

    Autotransplantation is an alternative treatment in cases of missing teeth. Autotransplantation of teeth can lead to significantly shorter treatment time and an improved treatment result in certain cases of tooth loss, wherever a suitable tooth is available and the anatomic circumstances permit it. The presented case report, treated successfully with molar autotransplantation and orthognathic surgery, had a number of missing teeth and facial asymmetry.
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ranking = 1.8654024924617
keywords = tooth
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8/26. A syndrome of hemimaxillary enlargement, asymmetry of the face, tooth abnormalities, and skin findings (HATS).

    Hemimaxillofacial dysplasia and segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia appear to be the same syndrome, having the common features of unilateral abnormalities of bone, teeth, gums, and skin. oral manifestations are the hallmark of this condition. Those affected are generally recognized in childhood and may have partial anodontia, abnormal spacing of the teeth, delayed eruption, and gingival thickening of the affected segment. Reported cutaneous manifestations include facial asymmetry, Becker's nevus, "hairy nevus," lip hypopigmentation, discontinuity of the vermilion border, depression of the cheek, and erythema. The oral lesions do not appear to be progressive. We describe a child with features consistent with hemimaxillofacial dysplasia/segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia. Findings of a biopsy specimen from the cheek confirmed the presence of a Becker's nevus. Cutaneous findings reported in the previous 31 cases are reviewed and summarized. The acronym HATS (hemimaxillary enlargement, asymmetry of the face, tooth abnormalities, and skin findings) is introduced to reflect the spectrum of abnormalities in bone, teeth, and skin that may be seen in this developmental disorder.
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ranking = 4.7308049849233
keywords = tooth, eruption
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9/26. Utilization of third molars in the orthodontic treatment of skeletal class III subjects with severe lateral deviation: case report.

    AIM: This clinical report discusses the importance and use of third molars in the adult patient by presenting a case in which their use during orthodontic treatment allowed occlusal improvement. SUBJECT AND TREATMENT PLAN: The patient was a Japanese adolescent boy who had a skeletal Class III malocclusion with severe lateral deviation of the mandible, significant loss of posterior occlusal vertical dimension, due to premature loss of the maxillary and mandibular left first molars, and furthermore, both first molars had advanced carious lesions that had resulted in reduced crown heights and bilateral chewing surfaces. The mandible had shifted to the left, with a bilateral chewing pattern and a lack of posterior vertical alveolar height, which in turn had produced an abnormal occlusal plane and curve of Spee. The maxillary arch was expanded, the maxilla was moved downward and forward, and the mandible was moved slightly backward and rotated open to increase posterior vertical alveolar and crown height. The reconstruction of a functional occlusal plane was achieved by uprighting the posterior teeth to correct asymmetric posterior vertical alveolar and crown height, using a full multibracket system incorporating four third molars and closing the space from the missing first molars and extraction of the questionable first molars. RESULTS: A normal overbite and overjet and adequate posterior support and anterior guidance were established, achieving a better intercuspation of the posterior teeth. A favorable perioral environment was created, with widened tongue space to produce an adequate airway. A well-balanced lip profile and almost symmetric face were achieved using the four wisdom teeth without extraction of the four premolars. Subsequent mandibular growth, with development of posterior vertical alveolar height and temporomandibular joint adaptation, has resulted in an almost symmetric posterior vertical height and joint structure between right and left sides. These factors have contributed to the occlusal stability maintained for more than 5 years. CONCLUSION: In the growing patient, with missing and/or early advanced caries of the first molars, it may be more beneficial to plan occlusal improvement through extraction of the questionable first molar rather than premolar extraction. This method of treatment can equalize posterior vertical dimension and does not restrict tongue space. In addition, this treatment method addresses the clinician's concern about postorthopedic relapse due to tongue habits and eruption of the third molars.
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ranking = 0.067298753769168
keywords = eruption
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10/26. Transmigration of a maxillary canine. A case report.

    In the oral cavity, transmigration is defined as a tooth that crosses the mid-line by more than half its length. Following extensive literature review, it was found that, although well documented with respect to mandibular canines, there were only two publications detailing maxillary cuspid transmigration. This report presents a case of transmigration where the left maxillary canine gradually crossed the mid-line and migrated to the right side in a patient with hemifacial microsomia and cleft palate. The Mupparapu classification of the migratory pattern of the mandibular canines is discussed. Various clinical considerations, as well as guidelines for general practitioners to diagnose and manage such a condition, are also discussed.
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ranking = 0.93270124623083
keywords = tooth
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