Cases reported "Facial Dermatoses"

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1/6. Facial orf.

    Orf is an occupational dermatosis caused by a poxvirus that infects sheep or goats. Human transmission typically occurs in people in contact with the infected animals or by handling contaminated animal products such as wool or meat. The infection in humans is classically characterized by a solitary papule on the fingers or hands. Involvement of the face or head has rarely been reported. We report orf in a young woman with multiple nodules on the face.
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keywords = animal
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2/6. Traditions, anthrax, and children.

    anthrax is sporadically seen in turkey, especially among people who live in rural areas and who come in contact with animals. Two siblings with cutaneous anthrax are described in this report. A week before their admission to the hospital, contaminated cow's blood was smeared on their foreheads as part of a traditional ritual. Both children were successfully treated with crystalline penicillin. In developing countries, traditions such as blood smearing may be an important factor in the transmission of anthrax to children.
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keywords = animal
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3/6. Cutaneous anthrax associated with facial palsy: case report and literature review.

    BACKGROUND: anthrax is primarily an animal disease. bacillus anthracis, the causal agent in anthrax, is a Gram-positive rod. humans can acquire anthrax by industrial exposure to infected animals or animal products. methods: Reported here is the case of a 48-year-old male farm worker from iran with a history of direct contact with herds. He presented after 6 days of fever with toxicity and a crusted ulcer on the face that was later confirmed bacteriologically to be cutaneous anthrax. He was treated with large doses of intravenous penicillin and corticosteroids along with multiple subcutaneous epinephrine injections that were used to control the infection and massive facial edema. RESULTS: After 14 days, he partially recovered; however, ipsilateral facial nerve palsy developed and persisted despite therapeutic efforts. CONCLUSION: It is not possible to conclude whether early diagnosis and treatment of anthrax results in a lower risk of complications. Facial palsy can be added to the list of variable complications of the cutaneous effects of anthrax.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = animal
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4/6. Cutaneous granulomatous reaction to injectable hyaluronic acid gel.

    Injectable hyaluronic acid (HA) derivatives are the most used reabsorbable dermal fillers for soft tissue augmentation today and their utilization is considered safe. We report a cutaneous granulomatous reaction that developed in a woman 5 weeks after the first treatment with a nonanimal HA derivative for the correction of facial wrinkling. We describe the clinicopathological findings and course of the cutaneous reaction. The adverse reaction showed clinical and histopathological characteristics comparable to the few previously reported cases. All cutaneous lesions spontaneously disappeared without scars within 3 months. We conclude that even nonanimal injectable HA derivatives can be associated with delayed granulomatous reactions. The patient should be informed of this potential long-term complication.
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keywords = animal
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5/6. Cutaneous anthrax.

    The case of a 9-year-old boy diagnosed and treated for cutaneous anthrax is presented. We discuss the clinical features and course of this disease, encountered today only rarely in less developed regions where humans are in contact with infected animals.
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keywords = animal
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6/6. Successful medical therapy for deeply invasive facial infection due to pythium insidiosum in a child.

    pythiosis occurs in animals and humans who encounter aquatic habitats that harbor pythium insidiosum. drug therapy for deeply invasive infections with this organism has been ineffective in humans and animals; patients have been cured only by radical surgical debridement. A 2-year-old boy developed periorbital cellulitis unresponsive to antibiotic and antifungal therapy. The cellulitis extended to the nasopharynx, compromising the airway and necessitating a gastrostomy for feeding. P. insidiosum was isolated from surgical biopsy specimens of the affected tissue. On the basis of in vitro susceptibility studies of the isolate, the patient was treated with a combination of terbinafine and itraconazole. The infection resolved over a period of a few months. The patient remained well 1.5 years after completing a 1-year course of therapy. Cure of deep P. insidiosum infection is feasible with drug therapy.
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