Cases reported "Facial Dermatoses"

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21/123. Primary cutaneous nocardiosis in an immune-competent patient.

    We present a patient who was hospitalized due to a purulent skin lesion with a surrounding erythematous area in the region of the right paranasal crease accompanied by a swelling of the right eyelid. Initially the diagnosis of a carbuncle caused by an infection with staphylococcus aureus was supposed. A surgical debridement was performed and an antibiotic therapy was started. Only special microbial investigations requested by the clinician led to the diagnosis of a cutaneous infection with nocardia brasiliensis. The presented case is remarkable because the nocardia infection was in an immune-competent patient and the patient showed a primary cutaneous nocardiosis without dissemination.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nasal
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22/123. Olmsted syndrome: report of a case with study of the cellular proliferation in keratoderma.

    Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder that consists of sharply marginated keratoderma of the palms and soles, constriction of digits and toes that may result in spontaneous amputation of the distal phalanges, hyperkeratotic plaques around the body orifices, onychodystrophy, and other less common cutaneous and extracutaneous anomalies. Although some patients had other affected family members, most cases of Olmsted syndrome seem to be of sporadic occurrence. We describe a patient with the characteristic features of Olmsted syndrome. The symptoms consisted of diffuse transgrediens palmoplantar keratoderma and keratotic plaques around the mouth and nose. Our patient also had the associated anomalies of hyperhidrosis of the palms and soles and congenital deaf-mutism. Histopathologic study of the keratoderma demonstrated epidermal hyperplasia with acanthosis, papillomatosis, and orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis.Immunohistochemical study showed more basal and suprabasal keratinocytes of the epidermis with immunoreactivity for Ki-67 marker when compared with the keratinocytes of the epidermis of the adjacent non-involved skin. These results support the notion that Olmsted syndrome is a hyperproliferative disorder of the epidermis.
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ranking = 4.9675806811519
keywords = nose
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23/123. Cutaneous focal mucinosis: a case report.

    Cutaneous or dermal mucinoses are a heterogeneous group of connective tissue disorders in which there is an accumulation of mucin in the skin or within the hair follicle. They have a number of different morphologic presentations and can often be confused with other diseases. We report a 12-year-old Chinese girl with a 1-year history of a well-defined, hypopigmented plaque on her chin, consistent with cutaneous focal mucinosis, a rare condition in children.
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keywords = nose
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24/123. Segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia: clinical, radiological and histological aspects of four cases.

    Segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia (SOD) is a rare developmental disorder of the maxilla, primarily involving the posterior part of the maxilla. Clinically, the disorder is often diagnosed in early childhood due to a unilateral buccolingual expansion of the posterior alveolar process, gingival enlargement, absence of one or both premolars in the affected region, delayed eruption of the adjacent teeth and malformations of the primary molars. In this report, four patients with SOD are described. The findings were similar to earlier reports, but for the first time an ipsilateral rough erythema on the skin in two of the subjects is reported.
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keywords = nose
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25/123. Craniofacial hyperhidrosis successfully treated with topical glycopyrrolate.

    Treatment of craniofacial hyperhidrosis currently consists of thoracic sympathectomy, which is not widely available. Oral anticholinergic agents and beta-blockers may be effective but also carry significant side effects. We describe a healthy, active 27-year-old male resident physician who had excessive facial sweating with minimal exertion or stress. The sweating was especially pronounced on the forehead, nose, and upper lip. Daily topical application of a 0.5% glycopyrrolate solution to the face and forehead was offered. After the first treatment, facial sweating was significantly reduced and was well controlled under stressful situations, without any discomfort to the skin. No loss of efficacy was seen after multiple face washings. Facial hyperhidrosis recurred after withdrawal of the glycopyrrolate for 2 days, confirming its therapeutic effect. Two years later, he continues to use glycopyrrolate as needed. We conclude that topical glycopyrrolate is effective in treating craniofacial hyperhidrosis and is associated with few adverse effects.
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ranking = 4.9675806811519
keywords = nose
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26/123. Linear oro-facial lichen sclerosus.

    Lichen sclerosus is a depigmenting mucocutaneous disorder that most frequently affects the female genitalia. Lichen sclerosus affecting the oral mucosa is extremely rare. Oral lesions are asymptomatic but cosmetically unacceptable. We report here a case of lichen sclerosus presenting with a linear lesion over the nose that extended to involve the philtrum and the upper lip with intraoral extension up to the gingiva. Treatment with a short course of oral and intralesional corticosteroids resulted in partial resolution of the lesions.
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keywords = nose
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27/123. tuberous sclerosis: clinicopathologic features and review of the literature.

    INTRODUCTION: tuberous sclerosis is a hamartoneoplastic syndrome, which may involve multiple organ systems. Oral hard tissue manifestations of the syndrome have been described in the literature only as recently as 1955. patients who presented with clinical manifestations of tuberous sclerosis did not routinely undergo oral surveys to rule out 'lesions', and consequently data on 'lesions' in the maxillofacial complex is scant. Ten cases have been found in the English language literature, which describe maxillofacial 'lesions', which may be tumours, new growths, neoplasms or overgrowths occurring in patients diagnosed with tuberous sclerosis. PURPOSE: To review the literature for all maxillofacial lesions associated with tuberous sclerosis and to present an eleventh case of a patient with a maxillofacial lesion diagnosed as having tuberous sclerosis. RESULTS: Eleven cases were found with maxillofacial fibroblastic lesions associated with tuberous sclerosis. These lesions were all fibrous benign neoplasms found in the maxillofacial bony complex. CONCLUSIONS: Maxillofacial fibroblastic lesions in tuberous sclerosis have various histopathological presentations, some of which may be difficult to differentiate. Consequently, close microscopic examination of these lesions is necessary so that adequate surgical treatment is provided.
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ranking = 9.9351613623039
keywords = nose
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28/123. Hypohydrotic ectodermal dysplasia: an unusual presentation and management in an 11-year-old Xhosa boy.

    ectodermal dysplasia (ED) is an inherited disorder in which two or more ectodermally derived structures fail to develop, or are abnormal in development. Hypohydrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) or Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome, is an X-linked recessive syndrome with an incidence of 1/10,000 to 1/100,000 births. Because of its X-linked inheritance pattern, it is more common in males. HED is characterised by hypohydrosis (diminished perspiration), hypotrichosis (decreased amount of hair) and microdontia (small teeth), hypodontia (lack of development of one or more teeth) or adontia (total lack of tooth development). These patients present diagnostic and treatment challenges because of variable oral manifestations. This report describes an 11-year-old Xhosa boy, who was referred to the University Dental faculty by his general medical practitioner because of hypodontia. General facial features included: frontal bossing, a depressed nasal bridge, 'butterfly' pattern of eczema over the nasal bridge to the malar process of each cheek, thinned out hair, loss of vertical dimension of face and dry skin. Intra-oral examination revealed hypodontia with peg-shaped anterior teeth and diastemas. Radiological examination revealed no developing permanent teeth or tooth buds. diagnosis was confirmed by doing a sweat gland count. Management included oral hygiene instruction, fluoride treatments, construction of a partial lower denture and counselling about his condition with particular reference to the danger of hyperthermia and control of allergies.
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ranking = 2
keywords = nasal
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29/123. Chronic actinic dermatitis as the presenting feature of hiv infection in three Chinese males.

    There have been a few reports in the literature of chronic actinic dermatitis (CAD) associated with hiv infection, mostly in African--Americans of skin type VI, where photosensitivity predated the diagnosis of hiv infection. We report three cases, all Chinese males with skin type III or IV, who presented to our centre with CAD, and in whom advanced asymptomatic hiv infection was subsequently diagnosed. All had CD4 cell counts less than 100 cells/ micro L, with no evidence of aids-related complex. They were treated conservatively with photoprotection and topical steroids with mild to moderate improvement. A comparison with nine previously reported cases is made. The pathogenesis of CAD is unclear, but predominance of CD8 cells in severe cases and reversal of the CD4 : CD8 ratio in lesional skin and peripheral blood of hiv-negative CAD patients has been observed. CAD may be consequent to, and a presenting feature of, advanced hiv infection.
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ranking = 4.9675806811519
keywords = nose
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30/123. Occupational contact dermatitis to hydrangea.

    Two female commercial hydrangea growers, from separate nurseries, presented with similar hand and facial dermatitis. Both had a hand dermatitis affecting particularly the first three fingers and backs of both hands and complained of a recurrent facial dermatitis affecting the forehead, around both the eyes and bridge of nose. They related their dermatitis to their work. patch tests confirmed allergy to all components of hydrangeas including petal, leaf and stem. Avoidance resulted in resolution of their dermatoses. Allergy to hydrangeas has been reported previously although infrequently.
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ranking = 4.9675806811519
keywords = nose
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