Cases reported "Facial Injuries"

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1/5. A baby, a virus, and a rat.

    The authors present a case initially thought to be a child abuse homicide that, after complete autopsy and thorough investigation, was determined to be caused by a viral infection and complicated by postmortem animal activity. Neonatal herpes simplex infection and postmortem skin defects are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = animal
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2/5. Dentoalveolar and mandibular body fractures caused by a horse kick: report of a case.

    A rare case of multiple mandibular fractures and severe facial laceration is presented. The cause was a horse hoof kick to an unmounted equestrian. The pertinent literature is reviewed and the maxillofacial injuries associated with animal interaction are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = animal
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3/5. Postmortem injuries inflicted by domestic golden hamster: morphological aspects and evidence by dna typing.

    A case of postmortem animal scavenging by a domestic golden hamster (mesocricetus auratus) is presented. A 43-year-old woman, who was not under medical treatment, was found dead in her flat with the lower part of her body naked and her legs straddled. Her face showed extensive lesions of the soft tissues which the medical examiner interpreted as vital scalping injuries. The total findings at the scene suggested at first a sexual offence. On autopsy the face injuries were identified as postmortem defects by animal scavenging with the teeth marks typical of rodents. In fact, the deceased had kept in her flat a free-range golden hamster whose burrow contained numerous fingernail-sized pieces of skin, fatty and muscular tissue. By means of dna typing it was proved that these pieces of tissue belonged to the deceased.
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ranking = 2
keywords = animal
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4/5. Microvascular replantation of avulsed tissue after a dog bite of the face.

    Various authors have described successful microsurgical replantation of totally avulsed facial tissue. In a significant number of cases difficulties were experienced with the venous anastomoses and/or venous drainage of the tissue. Many different methods were used to overcome the problem. Despite these difficulties, good cosmetic and functional results were reported. These injuries are often caused by animal bites. Adequate wound care and the excellent local blood supply make immediate reconstruction after animal bites of the face a safe procedure. Other authors describing similar lesions and immediate repair have not reported the complication of wound infection. We report on a patient who suffered a dog bite with total avulsion of most of the left upper lip, cheek and left alar rim. Venous congestion was overcome by multiple needle punctures to drain blood from the outer surface of the flap and local of application of heparin. A good cosmetic result and the return of sensation and function of the orbicularis oris muscle were obtained.
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ranking = 2
keywords = animal
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5/5. Management of animal bite injuries of the face: experience with 94 patients.

    PURPOSE: Because of the large number of bacteria in the oral cavity, animal bite wounds are generally contaminated, and their treatment is difficult because of the risk of infection, especially in extensive injuries. This report describes the management of a large series of patients and recommends treatment guidelines on the basis of the results. patients AND methods: Ninety-four animal bite wounds on the face and head were analyzed according to the type of animal, location and extent of the soft tissue wound, duration and type of surgical treatment, occurrence of infections and their pathogen spectrum, as well as the choice of antibiotic therapy. RESULTS: dogs caused 91% of the bite wounds. Infections developed in 4 of 53 patients who underwent primary wound closure with minor edge excision and prophylactic administration of oral penicillin. Without antibiotic administration, 2 of 15 patients had infections, which were treated on an outpatient basis. Of 26 patients with initially delayed treatment, 18 showed clinical inflammatory symptoms with a wide spectrum of pathogens (escherichia coli, streptococcus, enterococcus, staphylococcus epidermidis, and proteus) on presentation. CONCLUSION: Extensive animal bite wounds on the face, even with soft tissue defects, should be treated according to the criteria of a esthetic reconstructive facial surgery. In view of the low infection rate, routine antibiotic prophylaxis is not justified.
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ranking = 8
keywords = animal
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