Cases reported "Facial Injuries"

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1/64. diabetes insipidus caused by craniofacial trauma.

    A patient is presented with diabetes insipidus secondary to craniofacial trauma. diabetes insipidus can occur in any patient within ten days of craniofacial trauma. Even the masked disease in the unconscious patient can be diagnosed by observation of intake and output, urinary specific gravities, and appropriate chemical studies. The disease can recur following operative reduction of facial fractures. diabetes insipidus can be successfully treated by intramuscular Pitressin and appropriate fluid intake.
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2/64. skin and soft tissue artifacts due to postmortem damage caused by rodents.

    Five cases of postmortem bite-injuries inflicted by rodents are presented (five males between 41 and 89 years; three cases caused by mice, one case by rats, one case of possible mixed rodent activity by rats and mice). The study presents a spectrum of phenomenological aspects of postmortem artifacts due to rodent activity to fresh skin and soft tissue: the majority of the injuries have a circular appearance. The wound margins are finely serrated with irregular edges and circumscribed 1-2 mm intervals within, partly showing protruding indentations up to 5 mm. Distinct parallel cutaneous lacerations deriving from the biting action of the upper and lower pairs of the rodents incisors are diagnostic for tooth marks of rodent origin but cannot always be found. No claw-induced damage can be found in the skin beyond the wound margins. Areas involved in the present study were: exposed and unprotected parts of the body, such as eyelids, nose and mouth (representing moist parts of the face); and the back of the hands. Postmortem rodent activity may occasionally be expected on clothed and therefore protected parts of the body. The phenomenon of postmortem rodent activity to human bodies can be found indoors especially under circumstances of low socioeconomic settings; outdoors this finding is particularly observed among fatalities among homeless people.
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3/64. Nasal reconstruction with an expanded dual forehead flap.

    Nasal reconstruction with an expanded dual forehead flap is described. This method provides for nasal lining and covering with one forehead flap. The relationship between the two flaps is more flexible than a folded flap. Rigid support can be placed between the two flaps. This is an effective method for the reconstruction of a composite nasal defect when it is difficult to find an appropriate local lining flap.
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ranking = 1.6080794987374
keywords = nasal
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4/64. zinc burns: a rare burn injury.

    A patient was presented with significant burns resulting from a workplace accident in a zinc production unit. This occurred as a result of the spontaneous combustion of zinc bleed under high pressure. The patient sustained burns to the face, body, and hands and suffered significant injury to the left cornea. Computed imaging revealed solid particles in the ethmoid sinus and also in the right nasal fossa, dissecting the right lacrimal duct. Photographic documentation is presented. This injury was potentially preventable and resulted from poor observance of safety procedures.
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ranking = 0.80403974936868
keywords = nasal
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5/64. Intubating LMA guided awake fibreoptic intubation in severe maxillo-facial injury.

    PURPOSE: To describe control of the airway in a patient with severe maxillo-facial injury using intubating laryngeal mask guided awake fibreoptic intubation. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 110 kg man presented with a severe facial injury due to a horse kick. Local examination showed a large transverse gaping laceration just beneath the nose, exposing the lower nasal cavities through to the posterior nasopharynx. It was planned to perform a surgical tracheostomy before surgical fixation of the maxilla and nasal bones. Considering the patient's weight, short neck and difficulty in lying flat, surgical tracheostomy under general anesthesia was considered the best option. Under topical anesthesia, an intubating laryngeal mask was introduced followed by a fibreoptic bronchscope. The endotracheal tube was threaded over the bronchoscope and airway control achieved. CONCLUSIONS: The use of an intubating laryngeal mask avoids the need for manipulation of the head and neck and acts as a 'shield' for the fibreoptic bronchoscope from surrounding blood in patients with maxillo-facial injury. The use of the fibreoptic bronchoscope ensures intubation under vision.
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ranking = 2.6080794987374
keywords = nose, nasal
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6/64. Walk-through injuries: glass door facial injuries.

    During 1998, 13 patients were treated in the Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center for complex facial soft-tissue injuries caused by passing through large, clear glass doors. All epidemiological details were gathered and analyzed. Of 1,100 soft-tissue facial injury admissions in 1 year, 13 patients had a substantial soft-tissue facial injury after passing through a glass barrier. Nine were injured during leisure time activity, five in a shopping mall, and four in their residence. Interestingly, the authors found a common pattern of facial injuries in all patients. It consisted of large, irregular, composite skin and soft-tissue flaps as well as large, tom, irregular skin lacerations. The nose was injured predominantly, and the injury was particularly complex. Their recommended management of these injuries is a thorough and careful evaluation of flap viability. Surgical management of avulsed, viable flaps includes margin debridement and repositioning. If the flap is narrow enough, it can be debrided and the margins adapted primarily. If viability of part of the flap is in doubt, that part should be debrided and used as a composite graft. When this graft dies, a full-thickness graft is taken from another facial site. The cosmesis of such a graft is better than using the debrided, thin segment as a skin graft that is too thin. The authors emphasize that there is a need to encourage authorities to reinforce regulations relating to injury prevention from architectural glass. The first is to use special glazing, either tempered glass, laminated glass, or both. The other method of improving safety is by indicating glass using decorations or warning stickers, or by making it partly translucent. Unless these regulations are obeyed, fatal or complex trauma may occur.
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7/64. Facial features of widespread neuroblastoma: a case report.

    A case report of stage IV neuroblastoma which presented with periorbital swelling and ecchymosis originally misdiagnosed as facial trauma. The child soon developed a sinister pancytopenia, which following extensive investigations was revealed to be due to an underlying neuroblastoma. Periorbital ecchymosis associated with neuroblastoma is termed 'raccoon eyes' and is a diagnostic trap for the unwary.
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8/64. Wooden foreign bodies in facial injury: a radiological pitfall.

    foreign bodies can present a diagnostic challenge to the maxillofacial surgeon. Three patients, who suffered from a penetrating injury with a wooden foreign body, were examined and treated. Their preoperative CT and MRI scans were evaluated. In an acute case, the penetrating wooden body mimicked air bubbles. In the other two patients, the wood was retained for several months and appeared with a much higher density on CT. In MRI the wooden foreign bodies gave a low signal intensity. In all injuries removal of the foreign body was delayed, because it was initially radiologically missed or misdiagnosed. In the appropriate trauma setting a penetrating wooden body must always be considered. Its attenuation value increases with time as water is absorbed from the surrounding tissues. Although the radiological appearance may show a great variety, CT imaging is the basic diagnostic technique. MRI is the method of second choice.
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9/64. Case report. Fatal rhinocerebral zygomycosis due to rhizopus oryzae.

    A case of rhinocerebral zygomycosis due to rhizopus oryzae, arising after trauma in a 53-year-old diabetic man, is reported. diagnosis was based on histological and mycological examination. Fragments of the colonies were observed by scanning electron microscopy. This is the first case diagnosed in Tuscany.
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keywords = nose
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10/64. Management of avulsive injuries of the nasal bones: review of the literature and three case reports.

    Blunt contusions, lacerations, and avulsion-type trauma are the most often reported nasal injuries sustained in motor vehicle accidents. The nasal skeleton and soft tissues are frequently involved and may require surgical repair of the injuries. The primary reconstruction often requires the use of autogenous grafts, and secondary revision surgery may be necessary. The treatment may require a multidisciplinary surgical team or a single surgeon who knows how to manage the injury. Optimally, the reconstruction of nasal bone avulsions is performed primarily, using autogenous graft materials. This article presents reconstruction of the nasal deformities in 3 patients involved in motor vehicle accidents. The authors describe and evaluate the various graft materials and surgical techniques utilized. The advantages and disadvantages of autogenous and alloplastic materials are discussed. Studies with more patients and long-term follow-up are required for a definitive evaluation.
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ranking = 6.4323179949494
keywords = nasal
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