Cases reported "Facial Neoplasms"

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1/66. melanoma of the face and mouth in nigeria. A review and comment on three cases.

    The absolute incidence of melanoma at all sites in blacks is higher than is commonly credited. There is a shift in site incidence to less pigmented areas including the mucosae but oral melanoma is still rarely reported in Africans. An unusual case of facial melanoma arising in a childhood naevus, and two oral melanomas, all in Nigerians, are described. The salient clinical features and the treatment of these cases are discussed, and the possible relationship between pigmented patches and melanomas in the mouths of blacks is examined.
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ranking = 1
keywords = melanoma
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2/66. Cutaneous malignant melanoma: Tabuk experience.

    Cutaneous melanoma (CM) has a rising morbidity and mortality in the western world but is rare in certain geographical areas including the middle east. The aim of this study is to define the pattern of CM in this environment over a period of about two decades. A review of associated histological reports, dermatology, plastic general surgical admissions and outpatient census statistic of the North West Military Hospital (N.W.A.F.H.) were carried out from January 1978 to June 1996. The clinico-therapeutic information from both the review case and newly discovered CM was then studied. The result shows that CM is probably rare in the Tabuk military environment and possibly has a low mortality among the affected individuals. The presence of only 2 cases of CM among 73,955 patients over about 20 years suggests that this neoplasm is rare in N.W.A.F.H. Surgery, with localised expert reconstruction, probably offers the best cure for uncomplicated CM in this area. It is suggested that the geographical environment, genetic attributes, custom, attitude, presence of white, painted, sun-reflecting buildings, traditional dress-code and behaviour of the indigenes probably contribute to the suppression of and protection against CM in Tabuk. It is recommended that regular, antimlanoma education awareness programmes among the indigenes and avoidance of sunbathing attitude of the expatriate community should be encouraged in order to maintain this suggested natural selection protection.
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ranking = 1.4339485862646
keywords = melanoma, malignant melanoma
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3/66. Choroidal melanoma with oculodermal melanocytosis in Hispanic patients.

    PURPOSE: To describe three Hispanic patients with oculodermal melanocytosis and uveal melanoma. METHOD: Case series. RESULTS: Three Hispanic patients with oculodermal melanocytosis and uveal melanoma underwent enucleation. The diagnosis of choroidal melanoma was confirmed by histopathologic examination. CONCLUSION: In the Hispanic population, uveal melanoma can occur in the presence of oculodermal melanocytosis.
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ranking = 1.6
keywords = melanoma
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4/66. Simultaneous occurrence of multiple melanoma in situ on sun-damaged skin (lentigo maligna), solar lentigo and labial melanosis: the value of dermoscopy in diagnosis.

    We report on a patient developing simultaneous occurrence of lentigo maligna lesions, solar lentigines and an extensive melanosis of the oral mucosa. Diagnostically, epiluminescence microscopy had a relevant role in the preoperative assessment and selection of suspicious pigmented lesions, as the lesions histologically labelled as lentigo maligna and solar lentigo were clinically indistinguishable. We review the clinical, dermoscopic and histopathologic differential diagnosis of solar lentigo, malignant lentigo and mucosal melanosis with other melanocytic and keratinocytic lesions and discuss the possible relationship between these entities.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = melanoma
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5/66. Amelanotic malignant melanoma following cryosurgery for atypical lentigo maligna.

    cryosurgery is an alternative treatment option to surgical excision for lentigo maligna. Clinical evidence of recurrence is usually characterized by repigmentation at the treated site. We report two patients who developed amelanotic malignant melanoma following cryosurgery for a pigmented lentigo maligna. These cases illustrate the potential risk of treating lentigo maligna with cryosurgery.
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ranking = 1.5424357328307
keywords = melanoma, malignant melanoma
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6/66. Spread of a recurrent lentigo maligna into a graft: a case for conservative treatment.

    lentigo maligna is an in situ malignant melanoma for which the treatment of choice is surgical excision. The recurrence rate in lentigo maligna is high and hence other treatments, such as cryotherapy, laser therapy, radiotherapy and Mohs' chemosurgery, have been described. Despite the high recurrence rate, spread of a lentigo maligna into a skin graft is rare. We describe a case of a recurrent lentigo maligna spreading into a skin graft, which, along with the cases described in the literature, highlights the presence of a group of low-grade malignant lentiginous lesions that may be managed by careful follow-up and observation.
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ranking = 0.30848714656615
keywords = melanoma, malignant melanoma
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7/66. A conservative surgical approach to the treatment of 'locally invasive' lentigo maligna melanoma of the face.

    lentigo maligna has the potential for malignant change, and is managed in many cases by wide local excision. However, there are clinical situations in which aggressive surgical management is inappropriate or unsuccessful. We present three such cases, in which a more conservative surgical approach was adopted and maintained over several decades.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = melanoma
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8/66. Pseudomelanoma after laser therapy.

    An 18-year-old man had a melanocytic nevus on the chin that had been treated with three different lasers at a private clinic for 2.5 years. This lesion was excised and sent to a pathologist. The initial histological diagnosis was reported as compound nevus coexistent with changes suspicious of malignant melanoma. The reevaluation of histology together with the clinical information that the lesion had been pretreated with laser resulted in a revised diagnosis of pseudomelanoma. It is important to be aware of this benign pseudomelanoma, which can arise as a complication of laser therapy, to avoid subjecting patients to unnecessary surgical procedures or other forms of adjuvant treatment.
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ranking = 1.5084871465661
keywords = melanoma, malignant melanoma
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9/66. Recurrent lentigo maligna as amelanotic lentigo maligna melanoma.

    Amelanotic lentigo maligna and lentigo maligna melanoma are extremely rare tumours. Even rarer is a recurrent amelanotic lentigo maligna or amelanotic lentigo maligna melanoma at the site of a previously removed pigmented lentigo maligna. We describe two cases of recurrent amelanotic lentigo maligna melanoma manifesting as erythematous plaques evolved from previously excised pigmented lentigo maligna.
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ranking = 1.4
keywords = melanoma
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10/66. Consequences of using escharotic agents as primary treatment for nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    BACKGROUND: The use of escharotic or caustic pastes to treat skin cancer is based on the centuries-old observation that selected minerals and plant extracts may be used to destroy certain skin lesions. zinc chloride and sanguinaria canadensis (bloodroot) are 2 agents that are used as part of the Mohs chemosurgery fixed-tissue technique. The use of escharotics without surgery has been discredited by allopathic medicine but persists and is promoted among alternative practitioners. patients may now purchase "herbal supplements" for the primary self-treatment of skin cancer, and physicians will see patients who elect this therapy for their skin cancers. OBSERVATIONS: We reviewed the history of escharotic use for skin disease and performed an internet search for the availability and current use of escharotics. Our search located numerous agents for purchase via the internet that are advertised as highly successful treatments for skin cancer. We report 4 cases from our practice in which escharotic agents were used by patients to treat basal cell carcinomas in lieu of the recommended conventional treatment. One patient had a complete clinical response, but had a residual tumor on follow-up biopsy. A second patient successfully eradicated all tumors, but severe scarring ensued. A third patient disagreed with us regarding his care and was lost to follow-up. One patient presented with a nasal basal cell carcinoma that "healed" for several years following treatment elsewhere with an escharotic agent but recurred deeply and required an extensive resection. The lesion has since metastasized. CONCLUSIONS: Escharotic agents are available as herbal supplements and are being used by patients for the treatment of skin cancer. The efficacy of these agents is unproven and their content is unregulated. Serious consequences may result from their use. Conventional medicine has an excellent track record in treating skin cancer. physicians should recommend against the use of escharotic agents for skin cancer, and the food and Drug Administration should be given the authority to regulate their production and distribution.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = melanoma
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