Cases reported "Facial Neoplasms"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/106. Mohs' surgery as an approach to treatment of multiple skin cancer in rhinophyma.

    BACKGROUND: skin cancer arising within a rhinophyma is rare, less than would be expected from the coexisting chronic active inflammatory process. In rhinophyma, multiple coexisting tumours of different histologic types present an unusual challenge and have never been described in the literature. OBJECTIVE: The treatment approach to multiple tumours occurring in rhinophyma, utilizing Mohs' surgery, is reported and discussed. PATIENT: The case of a 64-year-old farmer with basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basosquamous carcinoma occurring in the setting of longstanding rhinophyma is described. CONCLUSION: skin cancer, especially basal and squamous cell carcinoma, diagnosed simultaneously in a rhinophyma creates a challenge; the enlarged, inflamed, and hypertrophied tissue masks their margins. In our opinion, Mohs' micrographic surgery is the treatment of choice and should be primarily considered in view of the malignant potential of these tumours, as is shown by the substantial tumour extension in the case described.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nose
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/106. Genital angiofibromas in tuberous sclerosis: two cases.

    Cutaneous lesions are an important feature of tuberous sclerosis (TS). Facial angiofibromas usually begin to appear at the end of the first decade of life and are considered to occur in about 88% of adults with TS. They are only rarely reported on sites other than the face or front. In this paper, we report two patients with the complete syndrome of TS that had, in addition to classic facial lesions, multiple papules on the genital area. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of angiofibroma. One patient's lesions were misdiagnosed as genital warts and were so being treated before the correct diagnosis was made. Although we don't know the incidence of genital angiofibromas in TS patients, we believe that they might be underreported, because dermatologists generally don't look for them when they see these patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nose
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/106. Endoscopically guided midfacial degloving in infants for removal of congenital and acquired midfacial masses.

    Midface degloving allows excellent exposure for a variety of congenital and acquired pediatric facial masses. The petite facial skeleton of the infant and child, however, can limit the utility of this dissection, thereby necessitating external approaches and altered cosmesis. Endoscopic assistance can aid in safe and complete removal of these masses without the need for external surgical approaches. In this series, five infants underwent midfacial degloving for midface lesions. Those masses that could not be adequately visualized underwent midfacial degloving with endoscopic assistance. Successful surgical removal was accomplished without complications, with follow-up ranging from 1 to 5 years. No surgical nasal deformity, vestibular stenosis, or decrease in midfacial growth was noted. Midfacial degloving with endoscopic guidance in selected cases is a cosmetically appealing option for lesions not otherwise resectable by standard midface degloving.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.30391603083291
keywords = nasal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/106. Complex right hemisphere developmental venous anomaly associated with multiple facial hemangiomas. Case report.

    Complex developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) represent variations of normal cerebral venous drainage and consist of dilation of the superficial and/or deep venous system. These rare anomalies can occur unilaterally or bilaterally, supratentorially or infratentorially, focally or they can affect the entire hemisphere. Some DVAs are associated with cervicofacial venous malformations or facial lymphatic malformations. Anomalies of this type are generally clinically silent, and cerebral dysfunction is usually absent. Symptoms, when they occur, are most commonly headache or mild seizure disorders. The angiographic findings are striking, with well-formed but enlarged transcerebral medullary and deep and/or superficial cortical veins. Opacification of these venous structures occurs within the same time frame as a normal angiographic venous phase. The authors report the case of a 33-year-old man in whom a large inoperable arteriovenous malformation had been previously diagnosed and who presented with seizures. Repeated magnetic resonance imaging and angiography demonstrated abnormally dilated transcerebral, superficial, and deep venous structures involving the entire right hemisphere with no identifiable nidus. Additionally, multiple bilateral benign facial hemangiomas were present in this patient. It is important to recognize this rare venous appearance as a developmental variant and not mistake it for an arteriovenous malformation or a partially thrombosed vein of Galen malformation. Because these venous anomalies are extreme variants of the normal venous system, hemorrhage rarely, if ever, occurs and the patient can be reassured that no interventional or surgical therapy is necessary or warranted.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nose
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/106. Q-switched ruby laser treatment of a congenital melanocytic nevus.

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of medium-sized (1.5-20 cm diameter) congenital melanocytic nevi (CMN) has been the concern of dermatologists for decades. Although many techniques have been described and utilized, no single treatment has emerged as applicable under all circumstances. methods: The Q-switched ruby laser (QSRL) at 694 nm, a wavelength well absorbed by melanin relative to other optically absorbing structures in skin, causes highly selective destruction of pigment-laden cells. In addition, the 20-nanosecond pulse duration produced by this laser approximates the thermal relaxation time for melanosomes, thereby confining the energy to the targeted cells. RESULTS: In the present report, treatment using the QSRL resulted in complete clinical removal of a biopsy-documented medium-sized compound CMN with no recurrence after 5 years. In contrast to other therapeutic modalities, complications such has hypertrophic scarring, dyspigmentation, or atrophy were not observed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nose
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/106. Application of artificial dermis prior to full-thickness skin grafting for resurfacing the nose.

    Two patients with nasal skin defects resulting from excision of rhinophyma and multiple angiofibromas were treated with artificial dermis followed by full-thickness skin grafts taken from the postauricular region. The secondary skin grafts took completely in both patients, and the postoperative results were excellent. Although a two-stage operation is required, application of artificial dermis prior to full-thickness skin grafting is a reliable method for resurfacing the nose.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5.3039160308329
keywords = nose, nasal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/106. Prosthetic rehabilitation of large midfacial defects.

    Advanced tumors of the midfacial region often require removal of the nose, upper lip, portions of the maxilla, and other adjacent structures. When the resultant defects do not lend themselves to surgical reconstruction, prosthetic appliances may be used successfully to restore the functions of speech and swallowing to near-normal levels. The degree of success depends upon the nature of the previous treatment, the existing surgical defect, and the adaptability of the patient. The most important anatomical consideration is the form and amount of the remaining maxilla. Recent advances in the development of the polyurethanes have resulted in lighter, more flexible, and, therefore, better tolerated prostheses. Close cooperation between the surgeon and the prosthodontist is necessary if successful rehabilitation of these patients is to be achieved.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nose
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/106. Resurfacing of facial angiofibromas in tuberous sclerosis patients using CO2 laser with flashscanner.

    BACKGROUND: Angiofibromas are a common presentation of tuberous sclerosis. They cause considerable cosmetic and hygienic morbidity for patients. Treatments of angiofibromas have included curettage, cryosurgery, chemical peel, dermabrasion, shave excision, and 13-cis retinoic acid. Results from these modalities in many cases were not satisfactory from a cosmetic standpoint. copper vapor, argon, pulsed dye, and CO2 lasers have been used with success in isolated cases. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of CO2 laser resurfacing with flashscanner in the treatment of facial angiofibromas. methods: Two patients with angiofibromas on the face were treated with a CO2 laser with flashscanner. The cheek and nose were treated in one patient, and entire face was done in the other. RESULTS: Both patients showed remarkable cosmetic improvements without scarring. Mild hyperpigmentation was found in both patients, which disappeared in 1 month with the application of topical agents. Facial erythema persisted about 2 months in both patients. CONCLUSION: A CO2 laser equipped with flashscanner causes less residual thermal damage than conventional CO2 lasers and enables controlled depth vaporization for more precise and regular removal of angiofibromas. In whole-face resurfacing, more cosmetically acceptable results are possible because localized treatment leaves marginal prominences. Laser resurfacing is an effective alternative in the treatment of multiple protuberant angiofibromas even though we cannot permanently clear these lesions due to their nature.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = nose
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/106. Malignant fibrous xanthoma with metastasis to cerebellopontine angle.

    Malignant fibrous xanthoma is an uncommon tumor of histiocytic origin. It is a difficult tumor to diagnose, and may have an unpredictable and confusing clinical course. The malignant fibrous xanthoma described herein probably represents the first reported case of metastasis to the cerebellopontine angle. When properly diagnosed, the preferred treatment is wide excision. Metastases are usually to the lungs and regional lymph nodes, and portend a poor prognosis. radiotherapy appears to be of little value.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = nose
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/106. The extended Abbe flap in the reconstruction of complex midfacial defects.

    The Abbe flap is most commonly used to repair full-thickness defects of the lip that do not involve the commissure. This well-perfused axial flap is based on the labial branches of the facial artery. The inferior labial vessels have been shown to support a cutaneous territory, including the entire lower lip, chin, and submental skin. Defects extending beyond the confines of the upper lip may be reconstructed with an extended lip switch flap that is based on the inferior labial artery. This "extended" Abbe flap allows functional and cosmetically acceptable repair of the upper lip, medial cheek, columella, and nasal sill. Case presentations illustrate the technique and outcome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.30391603083291
keywords = nasal
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Facial Neoplasms'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.