Cases reported "Facial Nerve Diseases"

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1/43. facial nerve schwannoma in the cerebellopontine cistern. Findings on high resolution CT and MR cisternography.

    We report a case of facial nerve schwannoma originating in the cerebellopontine cistern, diagnosed by cochlear sensorineural hearing loss, and involvement in the facial nerve canal and the anterior epitympanic recess. Precise analyses of neuro-otological and neuroradiological studies are crucial to obtain an accurate preoperative diagnosis.
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2/43. Intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma.

    Intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma are uncommon. Preoperative diagnosis of parotid tumour as schwannoma is difficult when facial nerve function is normal. A rare case of solitary schwannoma involving the upper branch of the facial nerve is described and the literature on the subject is reviewed.
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3/43. Intracanalicular schwannoma of the facial nerve: a manifestation of neurofibromatosis type 2.

    Primary facial nerve tumors, which are relatively uncommon, can present a diagnostic dilemma based on their location and variable pattern of symptoms. Of primary cranial nerve tumors, schwannomas of the facial nerve rank third in frequency after those of the eighth and fifth cranial nerves. We report an illustrative case of an intracanalicular schwannoma associated with several central nervous system tumors, consistent with neurofibromatosis type 2. Initially assumed to be an eighth cranial nerve tumor, the schwannoma was found intraoperatively to arise from the facial nerve. early diagnosis and treatment enabled excision of the tumor without sacrifice of the facial nerve. facial nerve schwannomas can resemble acoustic schwannomas in their clinical presentation. Only a heightened level of clinical vigilance will point to the correct diagnosis and result in an optimal therapeutic outcome for patients with these rare tumors.
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4/43. Fibrous connective tissue lesion mimicking a vestibular schwannoma: case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: cerebellopontine angle fibromas are rare pathological entities that can mimic the presentation of vestibular schwannomas (VSs). Diagnosis of these benign lesions, however, is important, because treatment options may be different. The clinical, radiological, and intraoperative features of these unusual lesions of the cerebellopontine angle are discussed, with review of the relevant literature. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 41-year-old man presented with recurrent episodes of diminished hearing on the left side, accompanied by facial ticks and pain on the same side. magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic scans revealed a 1.5-cm, primarily intracanalicular lesion, suggesting a left VS. INTERVENTION: The lesion was partially removed through a retrosigmoid suboccipital craniotomy. Its intraoperative appearance and hard fibrotic consistency differed from the classic features of VSs. The pathological findings indicated nontumoral fibrous connective tissue. The lesion exhibited no features of inflammation or fat and was also negative for S-100 staining. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans demonstrated a small residual lesion, which exhibited shrinkage in subsequent magnetic resonance imaging studies. The painful ticks disappeared and facial nerve weakness improved postoperatively. CONCLUSION: Although cerebellopontine angle fibromas may present similar radiological features, their clinical presentation may be somewhat different from that of typical VSs. If a fibroma is suspected, radiosurgery should be avoided; limited surgery may be considered as an option for patients experiencing symptoms. Because fibromas may be intraoperatively noted to be fibrotic and vascular, radical removal may not be easy or justified. After the final diagnosis has been reached, conservative treatment of the residual lesion may be the best option.
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5/43. Huge facial schwannoma extending into the middle cranial fossa and cerebellopontine angle without facial nerve palsy--case report.

    A 46-year-old male presented with a huge facial schwannoma extending into both the middle cranial fossa and the cerebellopontine angle but without manifesting facial nerve palsy. Neurological examination on admission revealed no deficits except for speech disturbance. Computed tomography showed a multicystic tumor extending into the middle cranial fossa and the cerebellopontine angle, with destruction of the petrous bone. The tumor was totally grossly removed. Histological examination identified schwannoma. Total facial nerve palsy appeared postoperatively, but hearing acuity was preserved at a useful level. facial nerve palsy is one of the most typical symptoms in patients with facial schwannoma, but is not always manifested even if the tumor extends into both the middle cranial fossa and the cerebellopontine angle.
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6/43. hemifacial spasm due to cerebellopontine angle meningiomas--two case reports.

    A 54-year-old female and a 49-year-old female presented with complaints of hemifacial spasm. Both patients underwent surgery to remove cerebellopontine angle meningiomas. In one case, no vascular compression was observed at the root exit zone. The tumor was removed subtotally leaving residual tumor adhered to the lower cranial nerves. The hemifacial spasm disappeared immediately after the operation. The residual tumor was treated using gamma knife radiosurgery. In the other case, the root exit zone of the facial nerve was compressed by both the tumor and anterior inferior cerebellar artery and the tumor was removed totally. Postoperatively, the hemifacial spasm disappeared, but the patient suffered facial nerve paresis and deafness that was probably due to intraoperative manipulation. However, the facial nerve paresis gradually improved. cerebellopontine angle meningioma with hemifacial spasm must be treated by surgical resection limited to preserve cranial nerve function. Subtotal removal with subsequent radiosurgery to treat the remaining tumor tissue is one option for the treatment of cerebellopontine angle meningioma.
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7/43. A cavernous hemangioma simulating an intracanalicular acoustic neurinoma--a case report.

    A case of an intrameatal cavernous hemangioma is reported. The 53-year-old patient presented with decreased hearing and a slight 7th nerve palsy on the left. Clinical features and preoperative radiological appearances were indistinguishable from those of an acoustic neurinoma. Though, DD the involvement of all three nerves (N. facialis, N. cochlearis, N. vestibularis) should have lead to another entity. The tumour showed intraoperatively no relationship to the 8th cranial nerve, but was very adherent to the facial nerve. The macroscopic appearance differed to the usual aspect of an acoustic neurinoma. The final diagnosis was made after the operation with histopathological methods. The clinical features and pathology of this type of tumour are discussed.
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8/43. The crucial role of imaging in detection of facial nerve haemangiomas.

    facial nerve haemangioma is a rare benign neoplasm accounting for 0.7 per cent of all tumours involving the temporal bone. The diagnosis of a facial nerve tumour is often missed or delayed. early diagnosis is imperative as it influences the eventual outcome for facial nerve function. prognosis is related to the size of the tumour, the severity and the duration of pre-operative paralysis. The definitive diagnosis of a facial nerve tumour rests exclusively with high resolution imaging of the temporal bone using enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and thin-sectioned computed tomography (CT). This case emphasizes the crucial role that high quality imaging can play in the diagnosis of facial nerve tumours, and elegantly illustrates the imaging features of facial nerve haemangiomas.
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9/43. facial nerve neuromas: report of 10 cases and review of the literature.

    OBJECTIVE: This study reviewed the management and outcomes of facial neuromas during the past decade at our institution. The goal was to analyze differences in presentation on the basis of location of the facial neuroma, review facial nerve function and hearing preservation postoperatively, and understand the characteristics of patients with tumors limited to the cerebellopontine angle or internal auditory canal. We also report an unusual case of a facial neuroma limited to the nervus intermedius. methods: Nine patients with facial neuromas and one with Jacobson's nerve neuroma underwent surgery, and total resection was accomplished in nine patients. A chart review for pre- and postoperative data was performed, after which all patients were evaluated on an outpatient basis. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 47 years; mean follow-up time was 33.1 months. The most common presenting symptoms were hearing loss (six patients) and facial paresis (five patients). A total of five patients had progressive (four patients) or recurrent (one patient) facial paresis. No patient experienced worsened hearing as a result of surgery, and one experienced improvement in a conductive hearing deficit. Five patients required cable graft repair of the facial nerve; four improved to House-Brackmann Grade 3 facial paresis. Four of five patients with preserved anatomic continuity of the facial nerve regained normal facial function. There were no surgical complications. No tumors have recurred during follow-up. We report the second nerve sheath tumor limited to the nervus intermedius. CONCLUSION: This series documents that facial neuromas can be resected safely with preservation of facial nerve and hearing function. Preservation of anatomic continuity of the facial nerve should be attempted, and it does not seem to lead to frequent recurrence. Tumors limited to the cerebellopontine angle/internal auditory canal are a unique subset of facial neuromas with characteristics that vary greatly from facial neuromas in other locations, and they are indistinguishable clinically from acoustic neuromas.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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10/43. Intracranial trigeminal neuroma involving the infratemporal fossa: case report and review of the literature.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Intracranial trigeminal neuroma extending extracranially is not a common finding. We report the case of a patient with a right cystic trigeminal neuroma arising in the middle temporal fossa and infratemporal areas. The clinical, radiological, and intraoperative features of these unusual lesions are discussed, and the relevant literature is reviewed. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 35-year-old woman presented with a 4-year history of right serous otitis media associated with recent right facial paresthesia. A neurological examination revealed hypesthesia in the mandibular division of the right trigeminal nerve. Computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging scans demonstrated a 6 x 6 x 4-cm well-enhancing cystic mass arising from the middle temporal fossa and extending extracranially to the infratemporal fossa through the enlarged foramen ovale. INTERVENTION: The tumor was extradural and originated from the right mandibular nerve. It was subtotally removed via a subtemporal-intradural and extradural approach. A pathological examination revealed a cystic neuroma. The patient has remained well during 12 months of follow-up, and no evidence of recurrence has been noted on magnetic resonance imaging studies. CONCLUSION: Unilateral serous otitis media by obstruction of the eustachian tube is a rare initial manifestation of trigeminal neuroma. We emphasize the benefit of neuroradiological examinations (both computed tomographic scanning and magnetic resonance imaging), which provided the clearest preoperative localization of this large intra- and extracranial tumor. A combined frontotemporal and infratemporal fossa approach is preferred, considering the difficulty of surgical removal. The prognosis for most patients was good. Twenty-five previously reported cases were also reviewed.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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