Cases reported "Facial Neuralgia"

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21/26. Paroxysmal facial neuralgia secondary to a posterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    Paroxysmal facial neuralgia, typified by classical tic douloureux, may be secondary to intermittent compression of the trigeminal nerve by pulsating vascular structures. The critical area of compression, at least for producing true trigeminal neuralgia, is felt to be the dorsal root entry zone. One case of paroxysmal facial neuralgia, secondary to more distal compression of the trigeminal nerve by a large posterior communicating artery aneurysm, is reported here. The location of the compression may be important in producing the atypical characteristics of paroxysmal facial neuralgia that is not classical tic douloureux. The pain was relieved by clipping the aneurysm without excision or rupture of the sack.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neuralgia
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22/26. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia with cardiac syncope.

    Glossopharyngeal Neuralgia is an uncommon craniofacial pain syndrome that is occasionally associated with cardiac syncope. Involvement of the glossopharyngeal nerve may be painless or may be marked by true episodic neuralgia, and this justifies the term neuralgia reported here. We present 5 cases of this uncommon syndrome, of a total of 15 observed cases of glossopharyngeal neuralgia, successfully treated by section of the rootlets of cranial nerves IX and X or by microvascular decompression in the posterior cranial fossa. We also analyze the relevant literature and discuss the pathogenesis and treatment of the syndrome.
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ranking = 0.875
keywords = neuralgia
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23/26. Microvascular decompression in glossopharyngeal neuralgia.

    Glossopharyngeal neuralgia is a rare and often controversial cause for odynophagia and otalgia. The otolaryngologist, head and neck surgeon may be the primary physician called upon to diagnose and treat this entity. In this study, vascular decompression, or more specifically, elimination of contact between the ninth cranial nerve and the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, was employed as treatment in three patients. All achieved relief of their symptoms with this intervention. A review of the neurosurgical literature and the experience with vascular decompression in trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm, and glossopharyngeal neuralgia is presented. The authors conclude that vascular decompression is effective in carefully selected patients, and the role of the skull base surgeon in managing this problem is expanding.
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ranking = 0.875
keywords = neuralgia
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24/26. Stereotactic radiosurgical treatment of sphenopalatine neuralgia. Case report.

    Sphenopalatine neuralgia is a rare craniofacial pain syndrome that is characterized by unilateral pain in the orbit, mouth, nose, and posterior mastoid process. During attacks of pain, vasomotor activity often results in ipsilateral nasal drainage, eye irritation, and lacrimation. The authors present a patient with a 15-year history of sphenopalatine neuralgia who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery targeted at the sphenopalatine ganglion, with initial pain relief, and repeated radiosurgery 17 months later for partial pain recurrence. Two years following radiosurgery, the patient is pain free, no longer suffering from nasal discharge and eye irritation.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = neuralgia
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25/26. Epidural electrical stimulation of the motor cortex in patients with facial neuralgia.

    Chronic facial neuralgias often do not respond sufficiently to standard treatment methods. Alternative modalities are needed for long-term reduction of pain in such cases. The present preliminary report describes two patients with trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia, respectively, treated with standard methods without obtaining satisfactory pain relief. Electrical stimulation of the motor cortex contralateral to the pain area was employed in both cases and proved able to produce a long-term facial pain reduction. Alleviation of pain occurred after activation of the flat quadripolar electrode placed epidurally on the precentral cortical area and lasted as long as the stimulator was working. By changing the polarity of the electrodes, it was possible to induce tingling sensations and muscle activation not only contralaterally to the stimulated motor cortex, but also in the ipsilateral part of the face. No stimulator-independent pain reduction resulted from long-term use of the stimulation device. During a follow-up period of 18 months, a sufficient and relatively stable analgesic effect of electrostimulation was observed. One major complication of motor cortex stimulation during the follow-up period was a single generalized epileptic seizure in one of the patients.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = neuralgia
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26/26. Exogenous estrogen may exacerbate thrombophilia, impair bone healing and contribute to development of chronic facial pain.

    A 32 year old white female, in apparently good health, failed to respond to conservative wound care for alveolar osteitis after a routine mandibular first molar extraction. curettage and biopsy of necrotic alveolar bone from the #30 socket escalated her pain such that hospitalization was necessary for pain management with intravenous morphine. Twelve months prior to admission she had been placed on exogenous estrogen (Premarin, 0.625 mg/day) after a partial oophorectomy. While hospitalized, she was found to have resistance to activated protein c (APCR). Premarin was discontinued. After discharge, weekly changes of an antibiotic impregnated dressing allowed for progressive regeneration of bone and epithelium with gradual reduction in her pain. She was found to be heterozygous for the mutant factor v Leiden, a heritable factor for increased tendency to form thrombi, so-called thrombophilia. We speculate that the exogenous estrogen administration exacerbated the thrombophilia associated with the factor v Leiden mutation by compounding the patient's resistance to activated protein c thereby contributing to her development of osteonecrosis and severe alveolar neuralgia.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = neuralgia
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