Cases reported "Facial Neuralgia"

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1/27. Persistent facial pain following microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve.

    Pain in the face following microvascular decompression (MVD) can be due to persisting trigeminal neuralgia (TGN) or a variety of other facial pain syndromes. If magnetic resonance tomoangiography (MRTA) indicates continuing vascular compression and the patient has true persistent TGN, then the patient can be relieved of pain by repeating the MVD. When the MRTA is negative for continuing compression alternative techniques may be employed; section of the nerve at the pons may be the treatment of choice for true persistent TGN in the absence of neurovascular compression. In some cases the pain is dysaesthetic in nature and not persistent TGN. This is always associated with previous destructive lesions to the nerve, usually radio-frequency thermocoagulation. When this component to the pain is recognized pre-operatively the patient must be warned not to expect relief of this same component of the pain from MVD. When it is not possible to classify the facial pain clinically, improvement does not occur following MVD even when there is clear evidence of vascular compression on MRTA.
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ranking = 1
keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve
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2/27. Infraorbital nerve palsy: a complication of laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PURPOSE: To report infraorbital nerve dysfunction after laser in situ keratomileusis. DESIGN: Observational case report. methods: Neuro-ophthalmologic examination with brain and orbital magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and orbital computed tomography (CT). RESULTS: During laser in situ keratomileusis, two healthy women, aged 42 and 46 years, experienced acute onset of sharp ipsilateral cheek pain. Both cases occurred during manipulation of the eyelid speculum. Postoperatively, ipsilateral numbness and tingling or pain of the upper cheek was reported, and examination showed decreased sensation in the distribution of the infraorbital nerve. In both cases, brain and orbit MRI and orbit CT were normal. Both patients were managed medically. In one patient, mild symptoms persisted 1 year postoperatively, and in the second patient, moderate discomfort persisted 8 months postoperatively. CONCLUSION: Infraorbital nerve palsy is a potential complication of laser in situ keratomileusis. Symptoms improve but may persist.
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ranking = 0.010800661339449
keywords = nerve
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3/27. motor cortex stimulation for neuropathic facial pain.

    facial neuralgia is the last common pathway for a variety of pathological conditions with different etiology. Neuropathic facial pain is often refractory to routine medical or surgical treatments. We present here a long-term follow-up of two patients with unilateral facial neuropathic pain due to idiopathic trigeminal neuropathy or to surgical trauma to the glossopharyngeal nerve, respectively. These patients have been treated by other modalities for several years without obtaining satisfactory pain relief. Electrical stimulation of the motor cortex (MCS) with a quadripolar electrode contralateral to the painful area of the face was attempted in both cases for control of the facial pain, and resulted in immediate analgesia with more than 50% pain reduction. During a follow-up period of 72 months, a sufficient (> 50%) and stable analgesic effect of MCS was observed. These cases are discussed and the recent literature on MCS is reviewed in an attempt to identify indications for MCS as well as key structures in the brain for mediating the MCS effect.
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ranking = 0.0015429516199213
keywords = nerve
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4/27. Occipital neuralgia and twelfth nerve palsy from a chondromyxoid fibroma.

    The purpose of this case report is to record the unusual combination of occipital neuralgia and hypoglossal nerve palsy causing dysarthria, dysphagia, and unilateral weakness of tongue protrusion, with no other neurological findings. The cause was a discrete tumor in the clivus and the right occipital condyle. Following surgical resection of the tumor, dysarthria and dysphagia persisted. These improved with therapy by a speech therapist, but deviation of the tongue persisted on protrusion. No similar case reports were found in the literature. In addition, the tumor was an unusual one, a chondromyxoid fibroma (CMF); these tumors uncommonly involve the skull base.
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ranking = 0.0077147580996064
keywords = nerve
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5/27. Painful sweating.

    OBJECTIVE: The authors report a case of spontaneous and gustatory facial pain and sweating. methods: The patient had frequent episodes of pain, sweating, and flushing bilaterally in the hairless skin of the ophthalmic and maxillary distributions of the trigeminal nerve. Gustatory stimuli (e.g., orange juice, pickled onions) reliably evoked episodes, but episodes also frequently came on spontaneously. The problem had begun during adolescence, about the time of topical treatment and then electrocauteries for facial warts. The patient reported benefit from tricyclic antidepressants, guanethidine, and trospium chloride (an anti-cholinergic quaternary amine used in europe for urinary urgency). There was no pain or excessive sweating in other body areas, nor pain with exercise. RESULTS: Administration of edrophonium IV evoked pain and sweating, and ganglion blockade by IV trimethaphan eliminated pain and sweating and markedly attenuated responses to edrophonium. Trospium chloride also prevented edrophonium-induced pain and sweating. Bicycle exercise produced the same increment in forehead humidity as in a spontaneous episode but did not evoke pain. tyramine infusion did not bring on pain or sweating, whereas iontophoretic acetylcholine administration to one cheek evoked pain and sweating bilaterally. Topical glycopyrrolate cream eliminated spontaneous, gustatory, and edrophonium-induced episodes. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that facial pain and sweating can result from occupation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors after acetylcholine release from local nerves. The authors propose that after destruction of cutaneous nerves, aberrant regenerant sprouting innervates sweat glands, producing gustatory sweating as in auriculotemporal syndrome (Frey syndrome), and innervates nociceptors, producing pain.
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ranking = 0.25231442742988
keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve
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6/27. Herpes zoster in hiv infection with osteonecrosis of the jaw and tooth exfoliation.

    BACKGROUND: Herpes zoster (HZ) infection of the trigeminal nerve is associated with complications such as postherpetic neuralgia, facial scarring, loss of hearing ability and conjunctivitis. Until 2005, postherpetic alveolar necrosis and spontaneous tooth exfoliation have been described in 20 cases unrelated to hiv infection. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe hiv infection in patients (two women, two men, average age 30 years) who suffered from HZ attacks to their trigeminal nerves. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: None of the patients had received antiherpetic medications or antiretroviral therapy. hiv infection was only diagnosed after the development of HZ. Facial scarring with depigmentation and hyperesthesia (postherpetic neuralgia) was diagnosed in all four patients. Oral findings consisted of spontaneous loss of both maxillary or mandibular teeth. osteonecrosis of varying extent was also found. Treatment consisted of extractions of teeth and administration of antibiotics and analgesics. Healing of alveolar wounds was unremarkable. CONCLUSION: Complications affecting the alveolar bone and teeth seem to be rare in hiv-infected patients.
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ranking = 0.49845704838008
keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve
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7/27. Occipital neuralgia evoked by facial herpes zoster infection.

    Occipital neuralgia is a pain syndrome which may usually be induced by spasms of the cervical muscles or trauma to the greater or lesser occipital nerves. We report a patient with occipital neuralgia followed by facial herpes lesion. A 74-year-old male experienced sudden-onset severe headache in the occipital area. The pain was localized to the distribution of the right side of the greater occipital nerve, and palpation of the right greater occipital nerve reproduces the pain. He was diagnosed with occipital neuralgia according to ICHD-II criteria. A few days later, the occipital pain was followed by reddening of the skin and the appearance, of varying size, of vesicles on the right side of his face (the maxillary nerve and the mandibular nerve region). This was diagnosed as herpes zoster. This case represents a combination of facial herpes lesions and pain in the C2 and C3 regions. The pain syndromes can be confusing, and the classic herpes zoster infection should be considered even when no skin lesions are established.
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ranking = 0.0077147580996064
keywords = nerve
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8/27. Necrotizing retinopathy with herpes zoster ophthalmicus: a light and electron microscopical study.

    A necrotizing retinopathy following a vesicular cutaneous eruption in the distribution of the right trigeminal nerve developed in a patient who had been receiving systemic corticosteroid therapy one week prior to the onset of herpes zoster ophthalmicus. Seven weeks after the herpetic symptoms began, the patient died of pneumonia following an intracerebral hematoma. At postmortem examination, unexpected multiple focal and confluent lesions, which corresponded to areas of extensive retinal necrosis, were observed in the fundus of the right eye. Intranuclear inclusions with a perinuclear halo were identified within the affected sensory retina. Electron microscopy of the retinal lesions disclosed round to oval enveloped viral particles that were characteristic of the herpes viruses. A mild lymphocytic infiltrate was evident in a demyelinated right Gasserian ganglion. Demyelination and necrosis of the right trigeminal sensory tract and adjacent areas were evident within the brain stem.
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ranking = 0.24922852419004
keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve
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9/27. Retrolabyrinthine approach: technique and newer indications.

    Excellent exposure of the cerebellopontine angle is obtained by an approach through the mastoid posterior to the labyrinth. Since the major portion of the dissection is extradural, this approach is associated with a very low morbidity. The retrolabyrinthine approach has been used for several years for selective partial section of the posterior root of the trigeminal nerve in cases of trigeminal neuralgia. Complete relief of pain has been accomplished in 25 of 28 cases, and the other 3 patients had partial relief of pain. The only complications in these patients were partial hearing impairment in 2, and 1 partial abducens nerve paralysis which subsequently recovered completely. Two patients required secondary closure of cerebrospinal fluid leaks. This approach has also been used for exploration and biopsy of cerebellopontine angle tumors and for treatment of other cranial nerve problems. We conclude that the retrolabyrinthine approach is the preferred route to the cerebellopontine angle in a variety of clinical conditions.
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ranking = 0.25231442742988
keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve
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10/27. Post-traumatic external nasal neuralgia--an often missed cause of facial pain?

    Pain about the bridge of the nose is often a diagnostic dilemma. There is an important recognizable subgroup who may, as a consequence of involvement of the external nasal nerve in nasal injury, exhibit neuralgic pain after a latent interval. Temporary relief by anaesthesia can be achieved and cure is possible by division of the anterior ethmoidal nerve. This rare cause of facial pain is presented using two illustrative cases.
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ranking = 0.0030945471522934
keywords = nerve, injury
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