Cases reported "Facial Pain"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/25. Cranial arteritis: a medical emergency with orofacial manifestations.

    BACKGROUND: Cranial arteritis, or CA, a vascular disease affecting primarily elderly people, may result in permanent blindness if untreated. Since it frequently mimics temporomandibular joint, myofascial or odontogenic pain, dentists must be familiar with this condition. CASE DESCRIPTION: The authors present reports of two patients who had signs and symptoms of CA, some of which were suggestive of other head and neck pain disorders. In both cases, the diagnosis of CA was confirmed by temporal artery biopsy, and treatment with systemic steroids resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Prompt diagnosis and treatment of CA not only results in resolution of symptoms, but also may prevent blindness, the most serious sequela of the condition.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/25. Airway compromise after routine alpha-hydroxy facial peel administration.

    High concentration alpha-hydroxy facial "peels" are widely used for cosmetic anti-aging purposes. We report a case of secondary burns to the neck and face resulting in airway compromise after a professionally applied citric acid facial treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/25. Orofacial pain of cardiac origin: a case report.

    It is the responsibility of the dentist to make the differential diagnosis of pain in the region of the oral cavity. Cardiac pain most commonly radiates to the left arm, shoulder, neck and face. In rare instances the pain may present as dental pain. In this case report, the patient presented with complaints of intense bilateral pain in the jaws which was diagnosed as pain of cardiac origin.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/25. Eagle's syndrome.

    Eagle's syndrome is an uncommon condition resulting from an elongated styloid process, which causes cervico facial pain, tinnitus and otalgia. A 48-year-old female presented to the clinic with bilateral upper neck pain radiating to the ears with tinnitus for almost one-year duration. Examination of the oral cavity revealed atrophic tonsils and palpable bony projection deep in the tonsillar fossa. Plain lateral neck X-ray and CT scan confirmed the presence of bilateral elongated styloid processes, which were subsequently resected surgically through an oropharyngeal approach. The patient was asymptomatic at follow up at 2 years.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/25. DentaScan: a new diagnostic method for evaluating mandibular and maxillary pathology.

    Although computerized tomography (CT) is valuable for evaluating head and neck pathology, it can be suboptimal when evaluating the presence or extent of mandibular and maxillary involvement by tumor, infection, or other pathology. The presence of dental restoration artifact, CT gantry positioning problems, and the inability to obtain cross-sectional images will diminish the accuracy of standard CT images. A program, termed either DentaScan or multiplanar reformation (CT/MPR), eliminates these problems by processing axial CT scan information to obtain true cross-sectional images and panoramic views of the mandible and maxilla. In this study, DentaScan imagery was used in 26 patients whose mandibles or maxillas were affected by tumor, osteomyelitis, or other pathology. CT scanning with multiplanar reformation proved useful in the precise location, assessment, monitoring, and treatment of various pathologies of the mandible and maxilla. Selected case studies illustrate the therapeutic implications and advantages of this new imaging technique.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/25. Heterogeneity in the clinical presentation of Eagle's syndrome.

    OBJECTIVE: Eagle's syndrome (ES) or symptomatic elongated styloid process is an uncommon but important cause of chronic head and neck pain. This study reports our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of a series of patients with ES. STUDY DESIGN: Patient histories, radiographic tests, and operative reports of 3 patients over a 3-month period were prospectively collected. SETTING: Tertiary referral otolaryngology service. RESULTS: All patients had resolution of symptoms relating to their elongated styloid processes after surgical resection. CONCLUSION: Although sometimes clouded by coexisting symptoms, ES can be easily diagnosed based on good history taking and physical examination. If diagnosed appropriately, surgical treatment can be administered promptly. SIGNIFICANCE: patients with ES commonly have a long history of chronic pain treated by multiple physicians. Appropriate diagnosis can lead to prompt treatment of this condition. EBM rating: C-4.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/25. Hamular bursitis and its possible craniofacial referred symptomatology: two case reports.

    The diagnosis of craniofacial pain is conditioned by the interdisciplinary management of its presentation especially in the absence of unique and objective signs. bursitis is a pathological entity recently found in the hamular area and should be included in the diagnosis for exclusion of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), ear-nose-throat pathologies, due to the similar symptomatology to other head and neck conditions. The hamular process bursitis is a painful condition that can easily be confused with glosopharinge or trigeminal neuralgia that generates an uncomfortable feeling in the oropharinge with ipsilateral referred--heteretopic-symptomatology to the head. This pathology, in chronic states, can be responsible for the amplification of the pain perceived by the central excitation effect. In this report are presented two clinical cases of hamular bursitis and its conservative therapeutic management. The recognition of the inflammation of the bursa of the tensor veli palati muscle supplies the specialist with another tool in the management of craniofacial pain.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/25. Multifactorial facial pain--differential diagnosis: a case report.

    A multidisciplinary algology team was formed to facilitate the diagnosis and treatment of complex head and neck pain disorders. The standard patient evaluation includes a history and physical, surface electromyography, minnesota Multi-phasic personality inventory (mmpi), brief psychiatric interview, dental/occlusal analysis, a postural/musculoskeletal examination; and necessary diagnostic imaging. Clinicians meet in conference after each clinic session. Organic and psychiatric findings are compiled and a differential diagnosis is made. Treatment recommendations are outlined and a review of the evaluation and the therapeutic plan are forwarded to the referring doctor. A typical conference discussion is presented here.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/25. Carotidynia managed by surgical denervation of the carotid bulb.

    Carotidynia is a syndrome of pain in the neck and face accompanied by local tenderness of the carotid artery. The symptoms are often misdiagnosed due to similarities with more common syndromes involving the cervical region. Spontaneous remission is common; more severe cases generally respond to anti-inflammatory medication or prophylactic drugs used for migraine. A case of severe carotidynia, unassociated with migraine is reported. Failure to respond to medical therapy led to surgical denervation of the carotid bulb. The immediate relief of symptoms following surgery confirms earlier observations regarding the mechanism of the symptoms. In severe cases of carotidynia, surgical denervation of the carotid artery may be indicated if medical therapy has failed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/25. maxillary sinus lymphoma: a consideration in the diagnosis of odontogenic pain.

    A patient with a known history of diffuse large cell histiocytic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the neck and left parotid gland presented with acute right maxillary odontogenic pain and swelling. Following endodontic treatment of the nonvital maxillary right second molar, minor masticatory discomfort persisted in the sextant but a dental etiology could not be established. Two months after the onset of symptoms, the right maxilla expanded uncontrollably and biopsy confirmed an antral lymphoma. The patient succumbed to the lymphoma and secondary complications 2 months later.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Facial Pain'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.