Cases reported "Facial Pain"

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1/27. The "missing link" in the origin of trigeminal neuralgia: a new theory and case report.

    Tic Douloureux (trigeminal neuralgia) has afflicted mankind for centuries, perhaps for all time. This sharp stabbing paroxysm of pain along the branches of the trigeminal nerve is described as "...one of the most painful problems that plagues mankind." Many theories about the cause of trigeminal neuralgia have been previously presented. Often these theories build on the previous foundations when new research presents itself. The complete picture still eludes researchers today. Much of the mechanism has been proposed, but researchers lacked one essential component. There has never been an answer to why these pains only occur in cranial segments and why, thankfully, TN is rare. What sets the stage for the development of TN? The unique neurophysiology of the trigeminal nerve and the accompanying ability of the Temporomandibular joints to create a sensitized neural system are the last piece of the puzzle. This central sensitization of the trigeminal nerve allows the development of a small cluster of neurons that act as a central trigger for the paroxysmal pain. The role of the TMJ in trigeminal neuralgia is illustrated by this case report.
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2/27. Infraorbital hypesthesia after maxillary sinus barotrauma.

    We report a case of a diver who suffered an episode of maxillary sinus barotrauma that presented with decreased sensation over the cutaneous distribution of the infraorbital nerve after an ascent which produced facial pain and crepitus. This case illustrates a potential confusion between a decompression sickness etiology and a barotraumatic etiology for the observed sensory deficit. The clinical features of this case were most consistent with a barotraumatic etiology for the findings noted. The anatomy of the trigeminal nerve and previous reports of cranial nerve deficits following barotrauma are reviewed.
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3/27. hemangioma of the mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve in the Meckel cave presenting with facial pain and sixth nerve palsy.

    In a 25-year-old woman with episodic periorbital-temporal pain who eventually developed a sixth nerve palsy, magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lesion predominantly in the Meckel cave that was found to be a capillary hemangioma arising from the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve. Hemangiomas of the Meckel cave must be considered in cases of facial pain with a sixth nerve palsy. even if there are no clinical findings of trigeminal neuropathy.
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4/27. Diaphragmatic cramp as a possible cause of noncardiac chest pain and referred mandibular pain.

    The initial assumption that sudden acute chest pain may be of cardiac origin is justifiable, but when this proves not to be the case the patient is left with little explanation of the cause. It is suggested here that diaphragmatic cramp may be a cause of some undiagnosed noncardiac chest pains associated with mandibular referred pain. The phrenic nerve provides both motor and sensory innervation to the diaphragm, while the trigeminal nerve carries sensation from the mandibular teeth. Both nerves originate in separate nuclei close together in the lower medulla. Interconnections between these nuclei and others higher up in the brain may provide one explanation for this problem.
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5/27. meningioma manifested as temporomandibular joint disorder: a case report.

    Pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the surrounding region constitutes a symptom of TMJ disorders. Various dental causes usually stimulate the trigeminal nerve, developing facial pain which triggers trigeminal neuralgia. However, trigeminal neuralgia may also arise from irritation of the endocranial root of the nerve, due to occult damage which has not yet manifested other symptoms, for example a meningioma. In this manner, the actual cause of pain in the ipsilateral half of the face may be interpreted incorrectly and may possibly be attributed to a TMJ dysfunction syndrome. This results in long-term frustration and burdening of the patient. The case of a 47-year-old woman is presented who complained of symptoms of a painful TMJ disorder. She was initially treated with the appropriate dental procedures and, upon continuation of the pain, was examined with CT scanning, which proved to be negative despite the existence of a cerebral lesion. Further investigation with MRI, however, revealed a meningioma of 5 mm size, in the region of the cerebellopontine angle.
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6/27. Conservative management of Gradenigo syndrome in a child.

    Gradenigo syndrome consists of the association of otitis media, facial pain in regions innervated by the first and second division of trigeminal nerve and abducens nerve paralysis. It is caused by osteitis of the petrous apex (PA) and is a very rare complication of otitis media. Its treatment usually consists in mastoidectomy and antibiotics. We report a case of a 6-year-old child, which was managed medically with a positive outcome.
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7/27. Sympathetic activity-mediated neuropathic facial pain following simple tooth extraction: a case report.

    This is a report of a case of sympathetic activity-mediated neuropathic facial pain induced by a traumatic trigeminal nerve injury and by varicella zoster virus infection, following a simple tooth extraction. The patient had undergone extraction of the right lower third molar at a local dental clinic, and soon after the tooth extraction, she became aware of spontaneous pain in the right ear, right temporal region, and in the tooth socket. At our initial examination 30 days after the tooth extraction, the healing of the tooth socket was normal; however, the patient had a tingling and burning sensation (dysesthesia) and spontaneous pain of the right lower lip and the right temporal region, both of which were exacerbated by non-noxious stimuli (allodynia). The patient also showed paralysis of the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve, taste dysfunction, and increased varicella zoster serum titers. A diagnostic stellate ganglion block (SGB) 45 days after the tooth extraction using one percent lidocaine markedly alleviated the dysesthesia and allodynia. These symptoms are characteristic of neuropathic pain with sympathetic interaction. The patient was successfully treated with SGB and a tricyclic antidepressant.
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ranking = 0.50307353995825
keywords = trigeminal nerve, nerve injury, injury
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8/27. Vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain - case report.

    BACKGROUND: Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) most commonly presents with ipsilateral disturbances of acoustic, vestibular, trigeminal and facial nerves. Presentation of vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain is quite uncommon. CASE PRESENTATION: Among 156 cases of operated vestibular schwannoma, we found one case with unusual presentation of contralateral hemifacial pain. CONCLUSION: The presentation of contralateral facial pain in the vestibular schwannoma is rare. It seems that displacement and distortion of the brainstem and compression of the contralateral trigeminal nerve in Meckel's cave by the large mass lesion may lead to this atypical presentation. The best practice in these patients is removal of the tumour, although persistent contralateral pain after operation has been reported.
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keywords = trigeminal nerve
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9/27. Progression of preexisting trigeminalgia to Tolose-Hunt-like syndrome. The importance of neuroimaging for early differential diagnosis.

    Recurrent unbearable, paroxysmal, unilateral facial pain in the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve often provoked by sensory stimuli is typical for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. The less frequent localization in the area of ophthalmic branch (5%) is particularly controversial and should be distinguished from pathological lesions in the brainstem and middle and posterior cranial fossa and from diseases of the orbit and eye. This case study presents a 79-year-old woman with typical clinical features of 1st division trigeminalgia without any neurological loss and with normal results of laryngological, ophthalmological, and stomatological examinations as well as neuroimaging CT, and MR /MRA evaluation. Only the evoked potential blink and masseter reflexes demonstrated the pathological values in the early phase of illness. After 1 year of pharmacological treatment no improvement was achieved and the pain became neuropathic and paresis of 3rd, 4th and 6th nerves developed, as observed in Tolose-Hunt syndrome. MRI of the orbit revealed a pathological mass in its apex with a connection to the superior orbital fissure. However, treatment with steroids was completely ineffective. Surgical resection of the tumor (leiomyosarcoma) only partially reversed oculomotor palsy and diminished aching. In differential diagnosis of idiopathic and symptomatic trigeminalgia, early MR and MRA imaging is the most essential and sometimes may be the best single test to evaluate lesions even in distant areas of the nervous system branches.
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10/27. temporomandibular joint disc disfigurement and abnormal thickening of the posterior band.

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc disfigurement is a common finding associated with various stages of disc displacement and injury. However, in most cases, the clinical diagnosis of disc displacement without reduction may not be readily apparent due to either a delay in patient presentation or lack of early imaging of the disc. The case of a 22-year-old woman with a history of TMJ disorder, seeking treatment for a history of unilateral posterior open bite and bilateral jaw pain, is described.
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keywords = injury
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