Cases reported "Facial Paralysis"

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1/17. Lyme borreliosis as a cause of facial palsy during pregnancy.

    The medical history of a pregnant woman in whom the initial pattern of complaints suggested hyperemesis gravidarum is described. After about 18 days the patient developed left facial palsy. Repeated tests eventually confirmed the diagnosis of neuroborreliosis. The problems concerning diagnostics, therapy and the possible complications of Lyme borreliosis during gestation are described.
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2/17. Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis presenting as facial diplegia in a 42-year-old woman.

    neurologic manifestations of human ehrlichiosis are unusual and have been described almost exclusively in human monocytic ehrlichiosis associated with ehrlichia chaffeensis. We report here a case of a previously healthy 42-year-old woman who developed bilateral facial nerve palsies in association with infection by the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (aoHGE). The diagnosis was made by specific polymerase chain reaction amplification of aoHGE sequences from samples of the patient's blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as well as propagation of aoHGE in culture of HL60 cells inoculated with the patient's CSF. To our knowledge, this is the first report directly demonstrating the presence of aoHGE in CSF, and it underscores the importance of considering HGE in patients presenting with a nonspecific febrile illness and unexplained neurologic manifestations. HGE should also be considered in the differential diagnosis of bilateral facial palsy-a rare occurrence.
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ranking = 0.045779850354687
keywords = lyme
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3/17. optic nerve lesion following neuroborreliosis: a case report.

    PURPOSE: Neuroborreliosis may cause various neuro-ophthalmological complications. We describe a case with a bilateral optic neuropathy. CASE REPORT: A 58-year-old female developed facial paresis six weeks after an insect bite. One week later she developed bilateral optic disc swelling with haemorrhages and nerve fibre bundle defects in the lower visual field of the left eye. In CSF and serum, raised IgM and IgG titres to borrelia burgdorferi were found. Systemic antibiotic treatment led to improvement of the vision and facial paresis, but not all visual field defects resolved, probably due to ischemic lesions of the optic disc. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSIONS: In optic nerve lesions due to neuroborreliosis it is difficult to distinguish between inflammatory and ischemic lesions. This patient demonstrated features of an ischemic optic nerve lesion.
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4/17. Ramsay Hunt syndrome: pathophysiology of cochleovestibular symptoms.

    Ramsay Hunt's hypothesis that herpes zoster oticus results from reactivation of the varicella zoster virus (VZV) in the geniculate ganglion is supported by the detection of viral genome in archival temporal bones of normals and Ramsay Hunt patients by the polymerase chain reaction. Ramsay Hunt syndrome is characterized by the presence of cochleovestibular symptoms in association with facial paralysis. VZV has also been demonstrated in the spiral and/or vestibular ganglion. Two cases are reported in which cochleovestibular symptoms outweighed the facial nerve symptoms, presumably representing VZV reactivation in the spiral and/or vestibular ganglion. From these observations and the known dormancy of VZV in non-neuronal satellite cells, it is argued that the cochleovestibular symptoms in Ramsay Hunt syndrome may result from VZV transmission across the nerves inside the internal auditory canal and that prompt treatment with an antiviral-corticosteroid combination might be justified in the management of any acute non-hydropic cochleovestibular syndrome.
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ranking = 0.045779850354687
keywords = lyme
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5/17. Varicella zoster virus: beyond facial paralysis.

    J. Ramsay Hunt's hypothesis that herpes zoster oticus results from a reactivation of the herpes zoster virus in the geniculate ganglion, has been supported by the demonstration of varicella zoster viral dna in the geniculate ganglion of the side with facial paralysis in patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, with the use of the polymerase chain reaction. Similarly, dna of the varicella zoster virus has been identified in the spiral and vestibular ganglion as well. We report on three patients with cochleovestibular symptoms as the first manifestations of Ramsay Hunt syndrome. A 64-year old woman and a 72-year old man presented with vertigo and an auricular herpetiform eruption. Only the woman developed later on a mild facial paralysis. A 58-year old man presented with an acute cochleovestibular syndrome, serologically proven to be a varicella zoster viral reactivation, which was followed three weeks later by the typical cutaneous recrudescence. We believe that these cases result from reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus in the spiral and/or vestibular ganglion. As the varicella zoster virus is dormant in the non-neuronal satellite cells, the facial symptoms in our patients as well as the high incidence of cochleovestibular symptoms in classical Ramsay Hunt syndrome can be explained by viral transmission across the nerves inside the internal auditory canal. Therefore, we think there are grounds to recommend a prompt treatment with an antiviral and a corticosteroid agent, not only in case of an acute facial paralysis but also when confronted with an acute cochleovestibular syndrome.
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ranking = 0.045779850354687
keywords = lyme
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6/17. Bilateral facial palsy: Epstein-Barr virus, not lyme disease.

    Bilateral facial palsy is frequently linked with lyme disease. We report a patient with bilateral facial palsy due to Epstein-Barr virus infection but with borrelia burgdorferi IgM in serum caused by polyclonal B-lymphocyte stimulation.
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ranking = 0.22269688926907
keywords = lyme disease, lyme
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7/17. Cogan's syndrome and seroreactivity to Lyme borreliosis.

    We document the case of a young woman with bilateral nonluetic, interstitial keratitis, vestibuloauditory problems, and bilateral recurrent facial palsies, who had strongly positive serologic tests of Lyme borreliosis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of positive serologic tests for borrelia burgdorferi in a patient with Cogan's syndrome.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = borreliosis
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8/17. lyme neuroborreliosis. peripheral nervous system manifestations.

    An ever increasing number of apparently unrelated peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders has been associated with Lyme borreliosis. To ascertain their relative frequency and significance, we studied prospectively 74 consecutive patients with late lyme disease, with and without PNS symptoms: 53% had intermittent limb paraesthesiae, 25% the carpal tunnel syndrome, 8% painful radiculopathy, and 3% Bell's palsy; 39% had disseminated neurophysiological abnormalities. To assess the interrelationships among these syndromes, we reviewed the neurophysiological findings in all 163 such patients that we have studied to date. Reversible abnormalities of distal conduction were the most common finding. Demyelinating neuropathy was extremely rare. The pattern of abnormality was similar in all patient groups, regardless of whether the symptoms suggested radiculopathy, Bell's palsy, or neuropathy. We conclude that (1) reversible PNS abnormalities occur in one-third of our patients with late Lyme borreliosis, and (2) the pattern of electrophysiological abnormalities is the same in all and is indicative of widespread axonal damage, suggesting that these different presentations reflect varying manifestations of the same pathological process.
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keywords = borreliosis
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9/17. Simultaneous palsy of facial and vestibular nerve in a child with Lyme borreliosis.

    We describe a boy with borreliosis characterized by lymphocytic meningitis and simultaneous palsy of facial and vestibular nerves on the left side. A mild sensoneural affection was also confirmed by brainstem evoked response audiometry. While symptoms of vestibular dysfunction quickly decreased during antibiotic treatment, facial palsy improved only slowly.
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keywords = borreliosis
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10/17. High-dose intravenous penicillin g does not prevent further progression in early neurological manifestation of Lyme borreliosis.

    We report two cases of Lyme borreliosis (LB) with erythema migrans (EM) and simultaneous meningopolyneuritis with radicular pain and lymphocytic pleocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). EM and pain disappeared completely under high-dose penicillin g therapy within few a days. Pathological findings in CSF improved. Nevertheless, during and after therapy, neurological signs of LB developed: cranial nerve palsies as well as paresis of extremity muscles with radicular distribution.
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keywords = borreliosis
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