Cases reported "Facial Paralysis"

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1/105. Facial canal decompression leads to recovery of combined facial nerve paresis and trigeminal sensory neuropathy: case report.

    BACKGROUND: Trigeminal sensory neuropathy is often associated with facial idiopathic nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy). Although a cranial nerve viral polyneuropathy has been proposed as the usual cause, in many instances the etiology remains unclear. This case report of recovery of both trigeminal and facial neuropathy after surgical decompression of the facial nerve suggests an anatomic link. methods: A case of a 39-year-old woman presenting with recurrent unilateral facial paralysis is summarized. Her fifth episode, which did not spontaneously recover, was associated with retroorbital and maxillary pain as well as sensory loss in the trigeminal distribution. RESULTS: A middle cranial fossa approach for decompression of the lateral internal auditory canal, labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve and the geniculate ganglion was performed. The patient's pain and numbness resolved immediately postoperatively, and the facial paralysis improved markedly. CONCLUSION: This result implicates a trigeminal-facial reflex as hypothesized by others. It suggests that decompression of the facial nerve can lead to improvement in motor and sensory function as well as relief of pain in some patients with combined trigeminal and facial nerve dysfunction.
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2/105. cholesteatoma extending into the internal auditory meatus.

    We report our experiences in managing a patient with cholesteatoma complicated by meningitis, labyrinthitis and facial nerve palsy. The antero-inferior half of the tympanum was aerated but the postero-superior portion of the tympanic membrane was tightly adherent to the promontry mucosa. An attic perforation was present at the back of the malleolar head. High-resolution computed tomography also uncovered a fistula in the lateral semicircular canal. Surgical exploration of the middle ear cavity demonstrated that both the vestibule and cochlea were filled with cholesteatoma, and the cholesteatoma extended into the internal auditory meatus through the lateral semi-circular canal fistula. The cholesteatoma was removed by opening the vestibule and cochlea with a preservation of the facial nerve. Post-operatively, an incomplete facial palsy remained, but has improved slowly. There is no sign of recurrence to date after a 3-year period of observation.
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3/105. Facial palsy after glomus jugulare tumour embolization.

    Facial palsy after pre-operative embolization of glomus tumours is a rare complication. In our case, complete facial palsy occurred within four hours after embolization with polyvinyl alcohol foam. Three days later, embolization material was found in the perineural vessels of the facial nerve in its mastoidal segment. Six months after complete tumour removal, facial decompression with perineural incision, and steroid therapy, facial function recovered completely. In cases of embolization of both stylomastoid and branches of the middle meningeal artery with resorbable material, temporary facial palsy can occur.
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4/105. Necrotizing fasciitis after cosmetic blepharoplasty.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of necrotizing fasciitis after cosmetic blepharoplasty. METHOD: Case report. A 74-year-old woman with history of type II diabetes mellitus underwent bilateral upper eyelid blepharoplasty. Postoperatively she developed fever, grayish discoloration of the skin, violaceous bullae, and a right facial nerve palsy. Necrotizing fasciitis was diagnosed and treated with intravenous antibiotics, debridement of necrotic tissue, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. RESULTS: The infection resolved, but the patient required reconstruction for correction of cicatricial ectropion. CONCLUSION: Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection that typically occurs in the setting of trauma. Early recognition of its pathognomonic signs and aggressive management are paramount.
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5/105. Delayed facial palsy after middle-ear surgery due to reactivation of varicella-zoster virus.

    Viral reactivation is thought to be an important cause of post-operative facial palsy of delayed onset. We present an unusual case of Ramsay-Hunt syndrome that occurred as a consequence of middle-ear surgery by triggering varicella-zoster virus reactivation. As a pathognomonic auricular eruption was not seen, the patient was initially misdiagnosed as iatrogenic facial palsy. Clinical features, diagnosis and management are discussed.
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6/105. facial nerve paralysis following repair of the external ear canal with ionomeric cement.

    A 20-year-old man developed a complete facial nerve paralysis following surgical reconstruction of the posterior ear canal with ionomeric cement. The paralysis developed gradually during the second and third postoperative weeks. Six weeks following the complete removal of the cement, the facial nerve recovered completely. The literature contains reports of diffusion of aluminum ions, which can reach toxic levels in tissue fluid and adjacent bone as the cement hardens. This side effect has been reported to cause an inflammatory response in the dura and brain and has led to fatalities. To our knowledge, there has been no other report of an ionomeric cement having a direct toxic effect on peripheral nerve transmission. Because ionomeric cements are used routinely in otosurgery, especially in canal reconstructions where the proximity to the facial nerve is evident, it is important to use caution when introducing ionomeric cements into near-nerve anatomic locations.
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7/105. Huge facial schwannoma extending into the middle cranial fossa and cerebellopontine angle without facial nerve palsy--case report.

    A 46-year-old male presented with a huge facial schwannoma extending into both the middle cranial fossa and the cerebellopontine angle but without manifesting facial nerve palsy. Neurological examination on admission revealed no deficits except for speech disturbance. Computed tomography showed a multicystic tumor extending into the middle cranial fossa and the cerebellopontine angle, with destruction of the petrous bone. The tumor was totally grossly removed. Histological examination identified schwannoma. Total facial nerve palsy appeared postoperatively, but hearing acuity was preserved at a useful level. facial nerve palsy is one of the most typical symptoms in patients with facial schwannoma, but is not always manifested even if the tumor extends into both the middle cranial fossa and the cerebellopontine angle.
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8/105. A giant internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm presenting with atypical trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve palsy in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: In cases of internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (IC-PC) aneurysm, involvement of the trigeminal nerve at its root is rare, and facial nerve palsy is even more unusual. CASE REPORT: A large, unruptured IC-PC aneurysm was detected in a 56-year-old man with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), but surgery was not performed because of mild renal dysfunction. Two months later, a sudden, severe headache suggested a subarachnoid hemorrhage, which was ruled out by computed tomography and lumbar puncture. Neurological examination revealed complete oculomotor palsy, atypical trigeminal neuralgia, and facial palsy with gustatory disturbance. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm that directly compressed the trigeminal nerve root, reached the internal auditory canal, and was adjacent to the facial nerve. The neck of the aneurysm was successfully clipped via a subtemporal transtentorial approach. The postoperative course was uneventful, and all neurological symptoms had resolved within 3 months. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that the prosopalgia in this case was atypical trigeminal neuralgia due to direct compression of the trigeminal nerve root by the aneurysmal sac. A contributory cause was stretching of the oculomotor nerve, which contains sensory afferent inhibitory fibers derived from the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve. The facial palsy was of peripheral type and was accompanied by gustatory disturbance. This is the first reported case of facial palsy caused by an IC-PC aneurysm and also a very rare case of an IC-PC aneurysm clipped by a subtemporal transtentorial approach.
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9/105. Neurinomas of the facial nerve. Report of three cases.

    Three cases of neurinomas of the facial nerve are reported. Two of them originated from the labyrinthine portion of the nerve and the other from the vertical portion. Neurinomas of the first part of the facial nerve can be suspected preoperatively since they seem to give rise to specific clinical and radiological manifestations that can be distinguished from tumors of other portions of the nerve, the petrous bone area, or the cerebellopontine angle. The reported cases of neurinomas of the facial nerve are reviewed and analyzed.
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10/105. facial nerve neuromas: report of 10 cases and review of the literature.

    OBJECTIVE: This study reviewed the management and outcomes of facial neuromas during the past decade at our institution. The goal was to analyze differences in presentation on the basis of location of the facial neuroma, review facial nerve function and hearing preservation postoperatively, and understand the characteristics of patients with tumors limited to the cerebellopontine angle or internal auditory canal. We also report an unusual case of a facial neuroma limited to the nervus intermedius. methods: Nine patients with facial neuromas and one with Jacobson's nerve neuroma underwent surgery, and total resection was accomplished in nine patients. A chart review for pre- and postoperative data was performed, after which all patients were evaluated on an outpatient basis. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 47 years; mean follow-up time was 33.1 months. The most common presenting symptoms were hearing loss (six patients) and facial paresis (five patients). A total of five patients had progressive (four patients) or recurrent (one patient) facial paresis. No patient experienced worsened hearing as a result of surgery, and one experienced improvement in a conductive hearing deficit. Five patients required cable graft repair of the facial nerve; four improved to House-Brackmann Grade 3 facial paresis. Four of five patients with preserved anatomic continuity of the facial nerve regained normal facial function. There were no surgical complications. No tumors have recurred during follow-up. We report the second nerve sheath tumor limited to the nervus intermedius. CONCLUSION: This series documents that facial neuromas can be resected safely with preservation of facial nerve and hearing function. Preservation of anatomic continuity of the facial nerve should be attempted, and it does not seem to lead to frequent recurrence. Tumors limited to the cerebellopontine angle/internal auditory canal are a unique subset of facial neuromas with characteristics that vary greatly from facial neuromas in other locations, and they are indistinguishable clinically from acoustic neuromas.
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