Cases reported "Facial Paralysis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/206. Facial canal decompression leads to recovery of combined facial nerve paresis and trigeminal sensory neuropathy: case report.

    BACKGROUND: Trigeminal sensory neuropathy is often associated with facial idiopathic nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy). Although a cranial nerve viral polyneuropathy has been proposed as the usual cause, in many instances the etiology remains unclear. This case report of recovery of both trigeminal and facial neuropathy after surgical decompression of the facial nerve suggests an anatomic link. methods: A case of a 39-year-old woman presenting with recurrent unilateral facial paralysis is summarized. Her fifth episode, which did not spontaneously recover, was associated with retroorbital and maxillary pain as well as sensory loss in the trigeminal distribution. RESULTS: A middle cranial fossa approach for decompression of the lateral internal auditory canal, labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve and the geniculate ganglion was performed. The patient's pain and numbness resolved immediately postoperatively, and the facial paralysis improved markedly. CONCLUSION: This result implicates a trigeminal-facial reflex as hypothesized by others. It suggests that decompression of the facial nerve can lead to improvement in motor and sensory function as well as relief of pain in some patients with combined trigeminal and facial nerve dysfunction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neuropathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/206. Congenital facial neuropathy in oculoauriculovertebral dysplasia-hemifacial microsomia (Goldenhar-Gorlin syndrome).

    Four patients with clinical features of Goldenhar-Gorlin syndrome who showed facial paralysis on clinical examination are presented. The fourth case died following surgery for cleft lip. autopsy revealed hypoplasia of the right facial nerve in its intracranial segment, with small right facial nucleus in the brain stem. Nosological aspects of the Goldenhar-Gorlin syndrome are discussed. Peripheral facial paralysis, as a part of this syndrome, is reviewed in the light of clinical and pathological findings and in its relationship to cardiac anomalies. It is suggested that Goldenhar-Gorlin syndrome is a part of a so-called cardiofacial syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.57142857142857
keywords = neuropathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/206. Marin-Amat syndrome: case report and review of the literature.

    We report a 10-year-old girl with Marin-Amat syndrome, a rare facial synkinesis sometimes referred to as the inverted Marcus Gunn phenomenon. Symptoms were apparent 6 months following unilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy. Her facial synkinesis failed to improve, despite improvement in her facial palsy consistent with an aberrant regeneration of the facial nerve. The clinical Several neurologic syndromes feature abnormal interactions, or synkinesis, between anatomically proximate muscle groups. Among these, the Marcus Gunn phenomenon (trigemino-oculomotor synkinesis) is one of the best described in children. The Marcus Gunn phenomenon, or 'jaw-winking phenomenon,' consists of unilateral congenital ptosis and retraction of the ptotic lid upon moving of the lower jaw. Although many adults have been reported with this synkinesis, it is usually most prominent in newborn infants, in whom rapid spasmodic movements of the lid are seen during periods of nursing. In general, the Marcus Gunn phenomenon is unilateral and sporadic although familial and bilateral cases have been reported. Marin-Amat syndrome (or 'inverse Marcus Gunn phenomenon') is a rarely reported synkinesis in which one eyelid closes upon full opening of the jaw or movement of the jaw laterally. We now report a 10-year-old patient who began to develop features of Marin-Amat syndrome involving the right eyelid 1 month following right facial nerve palsy. This is the first documented report of this syndrome in a child.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3.2730833128017
keywords = peripheral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/206. Genetic factors in human sleep disorders with special reference to Norrie disease, prader-willi syndrome and Moebius syndrome.

    Sleep-wake problems are common in specific inborn errors of metabolism and structure of the central nervous system. Psychological factors, behavioural difficulties, metabolic disturbances, and widespread rather than focal damage to the nervous system are present in many of these diseases and all influence the sleep-wake cycle. However, a number of conditions cause relatively focal damage to the neuroanatomical substrate of sleeping and waking. These include fatal familial insomnia, with involvement of the prion protein gene on chromosome 20, Norrie disease, the prader-willi syndrome and the Moebius syndrome. The last three important conditions, although rare, are considered in detail in this review. They result in sensory deprivation, hypothalamic and mid-brain damage, and involve the X-chromosome, chromosome 15, and chromosome 13, respectively. These conditions cause a wide variety of sleep disturbance, including parasomnias, daytime sleepiness, and a condition like cataplexy. The place of the relevant gene products in normal sleep regulation needs further exploration.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.078068802944673
keywords = nervous system
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/206. Facial trigeminal synkinesis associated with a trigeminal schwannoma.

    The authors describe the clinical and electrophysiologic findings in a patient with synkinesis between muscles innervated by the facial and trigeminal nerves after resection of a trigeminal schwannoma. Conventional facial nerve conduction and blink reflex studies were normal. Stimulation of the supraorbital and facial nerves elicited reproducible responses in the masseter and pterygoid muscles, confirming a peripheral site of aberrant regeneration of the facial and trigeminal nerves.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3.2730833128017
keywords = peripheral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/206. 80 cases of peripheral facial paralysis treated by acupuncture with vibrating shallow insertion.

    Eighty cases of peripheral facial paralysis were treated by acupuncture with vibrating shallow insertion. The total effective rate was 98.75% and cure rate 88.75%. There was no significant difference in therapeutic effect as compared with the conventional electroacupuncture method (P > 0.5), suggesting that shallow puncture by vibratings can also yield satisfactory therapeutic results.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 16.365416564008
keywords = peripheral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/206. Mobius sequence, hypogenitalism, cerebral, and skeletal malformations in two brothers.

    Two brothers born to a healthy, consanguineous Spanish couple have a syndrome of Mobius sequence with involvement of cranial nerves V, VI, VII, IX, and XII, central nervous system malformations; characteristic face with creased earlobes, short philthrum, and a short, arched upper lip, skeletal anomalies with short sternum and delayed bone maturation, hypogenitalism, and profound mental retardation. We suggest that this is a new multiple congenital anomalies condition and mental retardation (MCA/MR) syndrome with autosomic recessive inheritance.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.039034401472336
keywords = nervous system
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/206. Bilateral facial nerve palsy secondary to the administration of high-dose paclitaxel.

    Bilateral facial nerve palsy is an uncommon occurrence. We describe a case of bilateral facial nerve palsy secondary to a single cycle of high-dose paclitaxel therapy (825 mg/m2), in a woman with breast cancer. Prior to her high-dose therapy, she had a residual grade 2 peripheral neuropathy following treatment with ten cycles of standard-dose paclitaxel (total dose 3200 mg). The features of the peripheral neuropathy due to standard-dose paclitaxel, which can be both motor and sensory, are well described. Cumulative paclitaxel dose is considered a risk factor for development of the neuropathy. Although facial nerve palsy secondary to paclitaxel is not previously reported, other cranial nerve toxicity has been described. Consistent with reports of the reversibility of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy, the facial nerve palsies in our patient resolved over 23 months. Ongoing studies of high-dose paclitaxel warrant close attention to its cumulative neurotoxic effects, particularly in patients previously treated with neurotoxic chemotherapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 11.292321151725
keywords = peripheral, peripheral neuropathy, neuropathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/206. cat-scratch disease presenting as neuroretinitis and peripheral facial palsy.

    A 40-year-old woman with cat-scratch disease sought treatment for neuroretinitis OD and right peripheral facial nerve palsy. To our knowledge, this is the first case of an adult with a peripheral facial nerve palsy from cat-scratch disease and the first case of a patient with both neuroretinitis and peripheral facial nerve palsy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 22.911583189612
keywords = peripheral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/206. adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma with initial deafness.

    In July 1995, a 43-year-old Japanese man presented with deafness in the right ear. On hospital admission, he had deafness in both ears and right facial palsy. Variously sized lymphoid cells with convoluted nuclei were observed in the cerebrospinal fluid. Surface marker analysis revealed monoclonality of T lymphocytes in the spinal fluid. Similar abnormal cells were observed in peripheral blood and bone marrow. biopsy specimens of the stomach and prostate showed tight proliferation of large lymphoid cells in the interstitium and epithelium. Antibody against human T-lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was present. The diagnosis of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, diffuse type, was made. Seven months later, the patient died of sepsis. autopsy revealed multiple lymphadenopathy in the abdomen and the infiltration of atypical lymphocytes to the pancreas, kidneys, and other organs. A monoclonal band of HTLV-1 provirus was detected by Southern blot analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma with auditory nerve abnormalities as the initial symptom.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3.2730833128017
keywords = peripheral
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Facial Paralysis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.