Cases reported "Facial Paralysis"

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1/95. Neurotologic evaluation of facial nerve paralysis caused by gunshot wounds.

    facial nerve injury is one of the most common neurotologic sequelae of a gunshot wound (GSW) to the head or neck. However, few neurotologic studies have been performed on the nature and time course of such facial nerve impairments. This study was designed to characterize the neurotologic manifestations and time course of facial nerve paralysis caused by GSWs to the head and neck. We conducted a battery of electrodiagnostic tests on 10 patients who had experienced traumatic facial paralysis due to a GSW to the head or neck. The etiologies of facial nerve paralysis--including direct injury, compression, fracture, and concussion of the temporal bone--were demonstrated by audiologic, radiologic, and surgical findings. hearing loss and other cranial nerve injuries were also seen. Six of the 10 patients experienced a complete paralysis of the facial nerve and a poor recovery of its function. We also present a comprehensive case report on 1 patient as a means of discussing the evaluation of facial nerve function during the course of management.
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ranking = 1
keywords = nerve injury, injury
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2/95. Unilateral transient forehead paralysis following injury to the temporal branch of the facial nerve.

    BACKGROUND: Cutaneous surgery in the temporal region of the forehead can lead to injury to the superficial temporal branch of the facial nerve. A flattened forehead and with ipsilateral forehead paralysis can occur with damage to this nerve. methods: A case is presented of transient forehead paralysis resulting from Mohs' micrographic surgery with reconstruction of the defect. The paralysis resolved over a period of fifteen months. RESULTS: The anatomy of the nerve makes it susceptible to injury during cutaneous surgery. The area of danger is the area superior to the zygomatic arch and lateral to the lateral eyebrow where the nerve is closest to the skin. CONCLUSIONS: Restoration of motor function usually occurs without intervention, but may take several months. Should motor function not recur, nerve grafting of a repair of the ptotic brow may be needed. The anatomy of the nerve is reviewed and brow lifting options are discussed.
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ranking = 0.080315718162625
keywords = injury
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3/95. Bilateral facial nerve paralysis after high voltage electrical injury.

    A case of bilateral facial nerve paralysis of a patient who received a high voltage electrical burn is presented. This is an extremely unusual neurologic condition and has not been previously reported in association with electrical injuries. The patient regained nearly complete neurologic function several months after the incident.
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ranking = 0.053543812108417
keywords = injury
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4/95. Facial trigeminal synkinesis associated with a trigeminal schwannoma.

    The authors describe the clinical and electrophysiologic findings in a patient with synkinesis between muscles innervated by the facial and trigeminal nerves after resection of a trigeminal schwannoma. Conventional facial nerve conduction and blink reflex studies were normal. Stimulation of the supraorbital and facial nerves elicited reproducible responses in the masseter and pterygoid muscles, confirming a peripheral site of aberrant regeneration of the facial and trigeminal nerves.
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ranking = 4.1560124633132
keywords = trigeminal nerve
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5/95. Bell's palsy in the primary care setting: a case study.

    Bell's palsy is an acute unilateral paralysis of the facial muscles innervated by the seventh cranial nerve. Although the etiology of Bell's palsy is unknown, it is thought to result from edema, entrapment, or inflammation of the seventh cranial nerve. A history of recent viral infection--especially herpes simplex--diabetes mellitus, pregnancy, or hypertension are all common risk factors that may precede the onset. This article reviews assessment findings, differential diagnoses, and the treatment of Bell's palsy, which is considered a diagnosis of exclusion. A 10-day course of oral corticosteroids is the recommended therapy for lessening its course and severity in some populations. Recent research recommends the addition of acyclovir for 10 days, suggesting a herpetic viral etiology. Close follow-up is imperative to prevent corneal injury and to monitor worsening of symptoms. Although most patients recover within 1 to 6 months, incomplete recovery may be seen in severe or recurrent cases. Indications for referral are discussed. A case study is presented to illustrate the findings in this interesting disease.
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ranking = 0.013385953027104
keywords = injury
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6/95. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma associated with skin, muscle and cranial nerve involvement.

    The present case, a 75-year-old man with extranodal B-cell lymphoma showed facial hemiplegia, paresthesia and cutaneous manifestations. He was initially diagnosed as having a facial paralysis of unknown etiology. One month after the original diagnosis, erythematous indurated plaques developed on his left cheek and nose. A skin biopsy from the plaque on his cheek showed dense infiltrates of large lymphocytes with irregularly shaped nuclei and prominent nucleoli in the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. The lymphocytes were positive for L26 and CD79a. A diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was made. A muscle biopsy from facial muscle in the area of the erythematous plaque showed massive destruction of the muscle tissues by the lymphomatous infiltrates. Furthermore, electrodiagnostic study showed peripheral cranial nerve palsies, involving the left facial and trigeminal nerves. We conclude that diffuse large B-cell lymphoma may develop symptoms such as facial hemiplegia and paresthesia prior to cutaneous manifestations. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma must be considered as one of the important causes of palsies of cranial nerves at the peripheral level.
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ranking = 2.0780062316566
keywords = trigeminal nerve
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7/95. magnetic resonance imaging findings in a patient with bilateral facial paralysis due to malignant lymphoma.

    In malignant lymphomas, especially non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, invasion to the central nervous system (CNS) often occurs. A patient is reported here with bilateral facial paralysis due to invasion of a malignant lymphoma to the CNS. Contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed swelling of the entire length internal auditory meatus and enhancement in the entire length of the facial nerve. transcranial magnetic stimulation and MRI revealed that later facial nerve injury was present before the onset of paralysis due to a malignant lymphoma. Therefore treatment should be performed with consideration given to the possible invasion of the tumor to the CNS.
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ranking = 0.9866140469729
keywords = nerve injury, injury
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8/95. Pleomorphic adenoma involving the stylomastoid foramen.

    A rare case of an intratemporal pleomorphic adenoma is presented and the management of such a tumour is discussed. Some anatomical aspects of the facial nerve, pertinent to the pathophysiology of facial paralysis are outlined. This case demonstrates that tumour extension into the temporal bone can be resected successfully at initial surgery with excellent facial nerve functional outcome. We advocate exploration of the fallopian canal to be carried out at primary surgery and be performed by a surgeon familiar with the surgical anatomy of the intratemporal segment of the facial nerve. This approach will reduce the risk of facial nerve injury and palsy both at surgery and subsequently.
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ranking = 0.9866140469729
keywords = nerve injury, injury
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9/95. facial nerve injury following superficial temporal artery biopsy.

    BACKGROUND: With proper training, superficial temporal artery biopsy is a safe office procedure with few complications. Surgeons from different disciplines, including ophthalmologists, dermatologists, general surgeons, and plastic surgeons may be called upon to perform this common procedure to confirm giant cell arteritis. OBJECTIVE: To emphasize the surgical anatomy of the scalp as it pertains to superficial temporal artery biopsy and to raise awareness that significant complications can occur after superficial temporal artery biopsy. METHOD: Case report. RESULTS: A 75-year-old woman with presumed giant cell arteritis developed frontalis muscle paralysis following a superficial temporal artery biopsy. biopsy selection site within the danger zone combined with deep dissection carries the greatest risk of injury to the temporal branches of the facial nerve. CONCLUSION: Any surgeon involved in the practice of performing superficial temporal artery biopsies should have a thorough understanding of proper surgical techniques and regional anatomy to avoid potential devastating complications.
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ranking = 3.9598421409187
keywords = nerve injury, injury
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10/95. Otic capsule fracture with preservation of hearing and delayed-onset facial paralysis.

    The unusual occurrence of an otic capsule fracture with preservation of hearing is presented. In addition, the patient suffered facial paralysis beginning 6 days after the injury that rapidly recovered. Fifteen-month follow-up reveals stable hearing thresholds. The course of a fracture through the inner ear could be an important factor in determining the potential for hearing preservation.
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ranking = 0.013385953027104
keywords = injury
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