Cases reported "Facies"

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1/4. Muscular reconstruction to improve the deterioration of facial appearance and speech caused by mandibular atrophy: technique and case reports.

    One of the consequences of severe mandibular atrophy is the loss of attachment of the facial muscles that originate from the alveolar process and basal bone. Another is a loss of vestibular depth and reduction in the width of the attached gingiva. The result is reduced ability to chew, a changed and aged appearance, difficulties with pronunciation, and a reduced range of expressions. The traditional goal of treatment has been to improve the ability to chew. We describe a technique by which all these functions can be improved by a combination of insertion of implants and functional reconstruction of the facial muscles and position of the lips. When the muscles are repositioned, the buccal vestibule is deepened, and the incidence of gingival hyperplasia and infrabony pockets along the posts is eliminated. This treatment, which also rejuvenates the face and improves the ability to speak, should help to overcome the loss of self-confidence and self-esteem of these patients by improving their quality of life.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gingival hyperplasia, gingival, hyperplasia
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2/4. Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis.

    Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) is a rare autosomal recessive disease with onset in infancy or early childhood. It is characterized by papulonodular skin lesions, soft tissue masses, gingival hypertrophy, and flexion contractures of the large joints. The light and electron microscopic features are very distinctive. Here we report an 8-month-old boy with characteristic stiffness of the knees and elbows and pink confluent papules on the paranasal folds, and periauricular and perianal regions. He also had hard nodules all over the scalp and around the mouth, and severe gingival hypertrophy. Histologic and ultrastructural features were typical of JHF. Clinical features, pathology, and physiology are discussed.
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ranking = 0.012878152994483
keywords = gingival
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3/4. van den Ende-Gupta syndrome of blepharophimosis, arachnodactyly, and congenital contractures: clinical delineation and recurrence in brothers.

    We describe two Hispanic brothers born to unrelated parents with van den Ende-Gupta syndrome (VDEGS), a distinctive combination of characteristic dysmorphic features, skeletal abnormalities, and cerebellar hyperplasia. This syndrome was previously delineated by van den Ende et al. [1992: Am J Med Genet 42:467-469] and Gupta et al. [1995: J Med Genet 32:809-812], with additional reports by Phadke et al. [1998: Am J Med Genet 77:16-18] and Bistritzer et al. [1993: Clin Genet 44:15-19]. This is the fifth report of VDEGS, which is characterized by blepharophimosis, narrow nose with hypoplastic alae nasi, hypoplastic maxilla, everted lower lip, slender and elongated hands and feet, arachnodactyly, self-limiting joint contractures, and distinctive skeletal findings. This report of affected siblings, and a previous report of double second cousins born to consanguineous parents [Bistritzer et al. [1993: Clin Genet 44:15-19]], suggests autosomal recessive inheritance. This brings to eight, the total number of reported cases, derived from six families, three of which are consanguineous. It is important to distinguish VDEGS from Marden-Walker syndrome (MWS) since both syndromes include blepharophimosis, arachnodactyly, and congenital contractures. Both syndromes are inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion, but VDEGS lacks severe mental retardation, serious brain malformations, microcephaly, failure to thrive, and severe joint limitation, which are consistently present in MWS. Of particular importance, MWS may be associated with cerebellar malformations such as Dandy-Walker malformation, while the brothers reported herein with VDEGS both demonstrated distinctive cerebellar enlargement, a new finding for this disorder. While, congenital contractures with arachnodactyly are features commonly seen in several other delineated syndromes, such as congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) syndrome, characteristic facial features (blepharophimosis, narrow nose with ocular hypertelorism, prominent ears, and everted lower lip), distinguish VDEGS from other syndromes associated with CCA, including CCA.
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ranking = 0.00035260004741435
keywords = hyperplasia
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4/4. Homozygous beta thalassemia in an African-American pediatric patient.

    Homozygous beta-thalassemia in an African-American pediatric patient is rare. In homozygous, beta-thalassemia there are characteristic changes due to severe chronic hemolytic anemia. Orofacial characteristics of homozygous beta-thalassemia result from expansion of bone marrow causing skull and facial deformities. This expansion causes clinically recognizable maxillary hyperplasia, severe protrusion of the middle third of the face, and anterior displacement of the incisors producing a typical faces historically referred to as "Cooley's face." The orofacial characteristics of an African American pediatric patient are described in detail.
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ranking = 0.00035260004741435
keywords = hyperplasia
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