Cases reported "Fasciculation"

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11/52. Distal ulnar neuropathy as a cause of finger tremor: a case report.

    A secretary/typist developed work-related pain along the hypothenar aspect of the dominant hand. This was later followed by involuntary, finally continuous tremorous movements of the 4th and 5th fingers. Electromyographic abnormalities were limited to myokymia of 3rd and 4th interossei muscles. Surgical decompression of Guyon's canal with removal of the pisiform bone resulted in a complete cure.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neuropathy
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12/52. Mistaken diagnoses in continuous muscle fiber activity of peripheral nerve origin.

    The syndrome of continuous muscle fiber activity of peripheral nerve origin has manifestations that resemble those of many other more common neurologic disorders during childhood and infancy. This similarity often leads to misdiagnosis when an adequate index of suspicion is not entertained and a comprehensive electromyographic examination is not performed. Two affected patients from 1 family are reported to illustrate the type of diagnostic errors that were made before the establishment of the correct diagnosis.
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ranking = 11.350849999863
keywords = peripheral nerve, peripheral, nerve
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13/52. Fasciculations due to verapamil in a patient with neuropathy.

    A patient with pre-existing peripheral neuropathy developed generalized fasciculations under verapamil which ceased after discontinuation of the drug. It is suggested that the increase in acetylcholine (ACh) release at the neuromuscular junction by verapamil may trigger fasciculation in the state of regeneration at ACh-sensitive sites of axon terminals and immature axon sprouts.
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ranking = 2.292015415428
keywords = peripheral neuropathy, peripheral, neuropathy
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14/52. Facial myokymia in syringobulbia.

    A patient with a 2-year history of progressive ataxia and tingling in the right hand had prominent facial myokymia. magnetic resonance imaging revealed syringomyelia and syringobulbia. After successful syringosubarachnoid shunting, the patient died of massive pulmonary embolism. Postmortem examination revealed a syrinx involving the spinal cord and lower half of the medulla; neither the facial nucleus nor facial nerve fibers were directly involved. We hypothesize that interruption of aberrant corticobulbar fibers in the medulla produced disinhibition of a rhythmic neural generator in the facial nucleus.
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ranking = 0.092839770686642
keywords = nerve
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15/52. Facial myokymia. Pathological features.

    Pathologic examination in a case of facial myokymia showed edema and mild astroglial proliferation of the ipsilateral seventh nerve nucleus; gliomatous tumor involvement occurred rostral to this nucleus. These findings give circumstantial support to functional deafferentation as the cause of facial myokymia.
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ranking = 0.092839770686642
keywords = nerve
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16/52. Familial paroxysmal kinesigenic ataxia and continuous myokymia.

    A large family with paroxysmal ataxia and continuous myokymic discharges is described. The disorder is of autosomal dominant inheritance. During attacks coordination of movements and balance are disturbed; often a postural tremor of the head and the hands and fine twitching in some of the facial and hand muscles are present. The attacks usually last a few minutes and may occur several times per day. They first appear in childhood and tend to abate after early adulthood. The attacks are frequently precipitated by kinesigenic stimuli similar to those in paroxysmal kinesigenic choreoathetosis. Their occurrence can be reduced or prevented by carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. Between attacks a slight postural tremor and ataxia was found in a few of the elderly affected members. Fine rippling myokymia was obvious in a few and could be detected on close inspection in about half of the adults. electromyography (EMG) showed myokymic discharges in all affected members. The characteristics and reactivity of this myokymic activity suggest multiple impulse generation in the peripheral nerves.
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ranking = 2.2701699999726
keywords = peripheral nerve, peripheral, nerve
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17/52. Hypertrophic mononeuritis clinically presenting with painful legs and moving toes.

    A 40-year-old woman presented with progressive lower leg pain and spontaneous toe movement. The EMG showed a posterior tibial nerve mononeuropathy and continuous myokymic discharges in posterior tibial-innervated muscles. The MRI revealed a markedly enlarged posterior tibial nerve. Toe movements and myokymia were unaffected by the proximal transection of the lesion but ceased abruptly when the distal end of the fusiform "tumor" was resected, suggesting that spontaneous electrical foci may have been located along the nerve lesion. The markedly enlarged nerve segment contained edematous, swollen fascicles with marked Schwann cell onion-bulb lesions and angiocentric, lymphocytic, and lymphofollicular infiltration. This nerve lesion is an example of a newly recognized entity called hypertrophic mononeuritis.
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ranking = 0.71419885343321
keywords = neuropathy, nerve
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18/52. Developmental regression as an early manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency.

    Loss of previously attained developmental milestones in an infant is often associated with central nervous system tumor, neuromuscular disease, or an inborn metabolic error. An infant with developmental regression and involuntary movements who was found to be vitamin B12 deficient on the basis of unrecognized maternal vitamin B12 deficiency is described. The infant had a dramatic neurologic recovery after receiving vitamin B12. The case and a review of similar cases is presented.
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ranking = 0.010142951057383
keywords = nervous system
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19/52. Motor neuropathy with proximal multifocal persistent conduction block, fasciculations and myokymia. Evolution to tetraplegia.

    We describe a patient with chronic asymmetric motor neuropathy, which began in the upper extremity. The paretic muscles showed abundant fasciculations and myokymia but only little amyotrophy. Electrophysiologic examination revealed proximal multifocal persistent conduction block (CB) not located at the usual entrapment sites, and arrhythmic isolated or grouped fasciculation potentials originating distally on blocked axons. Over the years, new CBs developed, which led to tetraplegia, and amyotrophy slowly increased with progressive denervation. This patient differs from the cases of chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathy described in the literature by the absence of sensory deficit and the proximal location of CB.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = neuropathy
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20/52. Continuous motor unit activity confined to the upper extremities.

    We report a patient with clinical vermiform motor activity, muscle cramps, delayed relaxation of grip, and continuous motor unit discharges who developed mild symmetric symptoms in the upper extremities following a viral infection. Treatment with carbamazepine produced considerable symptomatic improvement. Needle electromyography (EMG) in several muscles showed irregular grouped spontaneous discharges composed of potentials resembling normal motor units. The discharges occurred asynchronously in distal muscles with identical and different peripheral nerve innervation but were not seen in more proximal muscles innervated by the same nerves. Our EMG findings indicate an origin of this spontaneous activity in the terminal branched motor nerves.
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ranking = 2.4558495413459
keywords = peripheral nerve, peripheral, nerve
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