Cases reported "Fasciculation"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

21/52. Seventh cranial nerve paralysis with myokymia during acute co-infection with hepatitis b and delta viruses.

    A patient with peripheral cranial nerve paresis and bilateral myokymia is described during the course of acute co-infection with hepatitis b and delta viruses. Specific circulating hepatitis b immune complexes were found by electron microscopy concomitantly with the neurological symptoms.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = peripheral, nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

22/52. hemifacial spasm and facial myokymia: electrophysiological findings.

    In two patients, one with clinical hemifacial spasm (HFS) and one with clinical facial myokymia, the spontaneous electromyographic findings consisted of regular burst activity: each burst composed of high frequency repetitive motor unit potentials. These bursts fired synchronously in multiple ipsilateral facial muscles in both patients and from a contralateral facial muscle in the patient with HFS. In addition, the patient with HFS exhibited crossed evoked responses on the affected side with stimulation of the facial and supraorbital nerves on the unaffected side. It is concluded that the current electrophysiological distinctions between HFS and facial myokymia may be unsupportable and that facial nuclear hyperactivity with activation of bilateral facial nuclear connections plays a role in the pathophysiology of HFS.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.11096690468424
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

23/52. Electrophysiological study on limb myokymia in three women.

    Physiological studies on three women with limb myokymia were carried out. The patients had diabetic neuropathy, neuromyotonia, and autonomic polyneuropathy, respectively. The EMG discharge pattern, coincident with myokymia, in a patient with myokymia and neuromyotonia differed from those with myokymia without neuromyotonia. In only the first patient did the electrical stimulation of nerves evoke "late repetitive response" (LRR), which resembled the wave forms of the myokymic discharge. Epidural and peripheral nerve blocks abolished myokymia in the first and second cases, but peripheral nerve block was without effect in the third patient. These findings indicate that myokymia originates in multiple sites of alpha motor neurons and that the pathophysiology may vary.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6.1354424523234
keywords = peripheral nerve, peripheral, neuropathy, nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

24/52. Timber rattlesnake venom-induced myokymia: evidence for peripheral nerve origin.

    Facial and limb myokymia occurred in four consecutive cases of timber rattlesnake envenomation and represents the "fasciculations" frequently reported in this entity. The facial myokymia disappears within hours of antivenin therapy and the limb myokymia by increasing serum ionized calcium. These observations suggest that the action of the venom is a biochemical one, increasing peripheral nerve excitability.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 13.567124096755
keywords = peripheral nerve, peripheral, nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

25/52. Slow resolution of multifocal weakness and fasciculation: a reversible motor neuron syndrome.

    A 25-year-old man with multifocal weakness and fasciculation was thought to have motor neuron disease. Signs progressed for 1 year, plateaued, and 3 years later resolved almost completely. There was no evidence of paraproteinemia, lymphoproliferative disorder, or vasculitis, and myelography was normal. Electrodiagnostic study disclosed multifocal, acute and chronic denervation that evolved into a picture consistent with residuals of old multifocal radiculopathy without active denervation. Prolongation of F response, absence of h-reflex, and conduction block in a proximal nerve segment suggested multifocal demyelination. A proximal motor neuropathy, perhaps demyelinating, may cause some of the benign motor neuron syndromes that simulate motor neuron disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.40977985915282
keywords = neuropathy, nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

26/52. Superior oblique myokymia: a prism lens approach to control.

    A clinical evaluation of a 35-year-old man with episodic vertical diplopia and oscillopsia is discussed. A diagnosis of superior oblique myokymia, a relatively rare and frequently undiagnosed neuromuscular syndrome is made. Considerable medical research suggests that this is a motor neuron disturbance related to regeneration following injury or inflammation of the trochlear nerve. This report discusses control of one patient's symptoms of monocular image fluttering with prism lenses. Various medical approaches including surgery have been found to have limited success and involve a high risk due to many contraindications.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.11096690468424
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

27/52. calcium and myokymia of brainstem origin.

    In five patients with guillain-barre syndrome, clinical myokymia increased and myokymic burst amplification occurred when ionized Ca was lowered by hyperventilation. myokymia decreased when ionized Ca was increased after IV infusion of CaCl2. These responses were absent or diminished in the four patients with myokymia due to brainstem lesions, suggesting that the blood-brain barrier impedes the effects of altered serum ionized Ca on axonal excitability. Altering serum Ca can distinguish peripheral and central myokymia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.44516547657879
keywords = peripheral
(Clic here for more details about this article)

28/52. Neuromyotonia in the spinal form of charcot-marie-tooth disease.

    The term neuromyotonia has been applied to spontaneous activity of peripheral motor nerves which gives rise to pseudomyotonia, muscular fasciculations and myokymia. A family is described in which 8 members of 3 generations suffer from the spinal form of Charcto-Marie-Tooth disease (distal type of chronic spinal atrophy). 5 of the 8 members were examined and found to have myokymia, accentuated by voluntary muscle contraction. Pseudomyotonia was present in 2 patients and, in the 1 patient treated, was abolished by carbamazepine. The association between neuromyotonia and charcto-Marie-Tooth disease has been reported in only 7 patients before but may be more common than previously thought because muscle cramps are reported to be a feature of this disorder.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.55613238126303
keywords = peripheral, nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

29/52. Syndromes of abnormal muscular activity: overlap between continuous muscle fibre activity and the stiff man syndrome.

    Four patients with muscular pain, fasciculations, contractures or cramps are presented. Evidence of peripheral nerve involvement was revealed by electromyography and nerve conduction studies. Muscle biopsy showed mild signs of denervation and reinnervation and, at electron microscopy, dilatations of terminal cisternae were found. All patients showed a remarkable improvement after therapy with diphenylhydantoin or carbamazepine. These clinical, neurophysiological and morphological data underline the role of peripheral nerve pathology in various syndromes of abnormal continuous muscular activity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5.5378165433863
keywords = peripheral nerve, peripheral, nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

30/52. mercury intoxication simulating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    A 54-year-old man had a syndrome resembling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis after a brief but intense exposure to elemental mercury. The syndrome resolved as his urinary mercury levels fell. mercury toxicity must be considered not only in individuals with recent anterior horn-cell dysfunction but also with otherwise unexplained peripheral neuropathy, tremor, ataxia, and a gamut of psychiatric symptoms including confusion and depression.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5442837740119
keywords = peripheral neuropathy, peripheral, neuropathy
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Fasciculation'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.