Cases reported "Femoral Neoplasms"

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1/8. Pseudoaneurysm of the popliteal artery caused by exostosis of the femur: case report and review of the literature.

    A 13-year-old boy with a solitary exostosis of the left femur was seen with a pseudo-aneurysm of the popliteal artery. When left leg pain occurred 3 months earlier, radiographic examination revealed an exostosis with a cartilage cap. Serial radiographic examination demonstrated gradual disruption of the cartilage cap of the exostosis as the pseudoaneurysm developed. An exostosis with an irregular surface was found at surgery. A literature review disclosed 39 similar cases in which loss of the cartilage cap was considered as one of the causes of the aneurysm formation. Considering the clinical course of our patient, however, we believe that exostoses lose their cartilage caps by pressure destruction due to the aneurysms. It is highly probable that loss of the cartilage does not cause the aneurysms.
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ranking = 1
keywords = exostosis
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2/8. Bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation (Nora's lesion): a retrospective study of 12 cases, 2 arising in long bones.

    Twelve cases of bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation (BPOP), also known as Nora's lesion, are reported. Ten lesions were located in the small bones of the hands, and 2 were located in long bones (femur and proximal tibia). Patient age ranged from 12 to 63 years (average, 30.3 years). radiography of the lesions in the hand bones showed calcific masses attached to the underlying cortex, without interruption of the latter. The long bone lesions revealed unusual findings. In the femur, BPOP presented with extensive cortical destruction and was suggestive of a malignant lesion. This presentation has not been described to date. In the tibia, the lesion was located in the soft tissue without cortical attachment. This type of BPOP probably represents an immature lesion that over time will mature to solid cortical attachment. On histologic examination, all lesions demonstrated 3 distinct components with variable degrees of representation: (1) hypercellular cartilage with calcification and ossification, with the calcified cartilage having a characteristic basophilic tinctorial quality; (2) cancellous bone undergoing maturation; and (3) spindle cell stroma without cytologic atypia. In 1 case with a long-standing history, the cartilaginous component was minimal. BPOP, together with florid reactive periostitis and turret exostosis, may represent different stages in the development of a posttraumatic proliferative process. BPOP apparently arises from the periosteal tissues through a process of cartilaginous metaplasia.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = exostosis
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3/8. Pseudoaneurysm of the superficial femoral artery associated with osteochondroma--a case report.

    Osteochondromas, the most common benign bone tumor, often go undetected and seldom cause significant clinical sequelae. Rarely they present as an arterial pseudoaneurysm, usually of the popliteal or superficial femoral artery. The authors present the case of a 14-year-old male with a distal superficial femoral artery pseudoaneurysm accompanied by distal embolization from a femoral exostosis.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = exostosis
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4/8. Superficial femoral pseudoaneurysm and arterial thromboembolism caused by an osteochondroma.

    A 13-year-old boy with a symptomatic distal femoral osteochondroma was found to have a pseudoaneurysm of the superficial femoral artery caused by the tumor and occlusion of the anterior tibial artery due to arterial thromboembolism. Excision of the exostosis followed by saphenous vein grafting resulted in an excellent clinical recovery.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = exostosis
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5/8. Hereditary multiple exostosis: another etiology of short leg and scoliosis.

    A case study is presented demonstrating a patient with a scoliosis as a result of a short leg. The etiology of the short leg was a large sessile osteochondrom in a patient with Hereditary Multiple exostoses (HME). A review of the condition is presented.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = exostosis
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6/8. Iatrogenic exostosis in a patient treated for osteomyelitis.

    A 10-month-old child treated surgically for osteomyelitis of the distal femur subsequently developed an exostosis at that site. No previous similar case has been reported. The etiology of exostoses is reviewed here, with evidence that this patient's exostosis could be iatrogenic.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = exostosis
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7/8. Popliteal pseudoaneurysm as a complication of an adjacent osteochondroma.

    A 19-year-old man presented to our institution with a 4-month history of a pulsatile mass in the left popliteal fossa. Evaluation including plain x-ray films, MRI, and arteriography revealed a pseudoaneurysm associated with an underlying exostosis of the distal femur. The pseudoaneurysm was repaired with a saphenous vein patch and the exostosis was excised. This case is reported in conjunction with an extensive review of the literature, which yielded only 25 similar cases reported in the English language since 1953. The majority of cases involved young men (20/26), whose ages ranged from 9 to 45 years (mean 20 years). Fifteen of the 26 cases involved isolated exostoses, and in less than half (12/26), antecedent trauma was identified as a cause of the pseudoaneurysm. The origin of exostoses and their relationship to popliteal pseudoaneurysms are discussed. Repair of the pseudoaneurysm and excision of the involved exostosis are recommended.
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ranking = 0.375
keywords = exostosis
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8/8. Muscle impingement: MR imaging of a painful complication of osteochondromas.

    The purpose of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of a newly recognized complication of osteochondromas. Two patients presented with pain and swelling over known osteochondromas. Plain radiographic studies were unrevealing. MR examinations were obtained to characterize the exostoses further and evaluate areas of palpable fullness. Increased signal was present in the muscles on T2-weighted images, which correlated with physical findings and was believed to represent muscle injury due to the osteochondroma. pain and fullness may result from a number of osteochondroma-related complications, the most worrisome of which is malignant degeneration. Muscular impingement and injury should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pain and swelling in the region of an exostosis. MR imaging allows distinction of this entity, which may be radiographically occult and confused clinically with fracture, bursitis, or malignant degeneration.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = exostosis
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