Cases reported "Fever"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/48. scleromyxedema with dermato-neuro syndrome.

    scleromyxedema is a rare connective tissue disease of unknown cause characterized by a generalized papular eruption, dermal fibroblast proliferation, and monoclonal paraproteinemia. A paroxysmal triad consisting of high fever, seizures, and coma with a flu-like prodrome can rarely occur in patients with scleromyxedema and is termed "dermato-neuro syndrome." We describe a 41-year-old patient with scleromyxedema in whom the dermato-neuro syndrome developed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/48. Lichen scrofulosorum.

    A 12-month-old boy with pulmonary tuberculosis developed a papular lichenoid eruption which showed epithelioid granulomas on histology, consistent with lichen scrofulosorum. Stains and cultures for mycobacteria in the skin were negative, and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis failed to detect the dna of mycobacterium tuberculosis in a skin biopsy specimen, thus making lichen scrofulosorum one of the remaining manifestations of M. tuberculosis infection in which evidence of the bacillus has not been found to date. Lichen scrofulosorum is now considered a rare form of tuberculid but should not be neglected.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/48. The schnitzler syndrome. Four new cases and review of the literature.

    The schnitzler syndrome is characterized by a chronic urticarial eruption with a monoclonal IgM gammopathy. The other signs of the syndrome include intermittent elevated fever, joint and/or bone pain with radiologic evidence of osteosclerosis, palpable lymph nodes, enlarged liver and/or spleen, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and leukocytosis. The mean delay to diagnosis is more than 5 years, and this syndrome is of concern to internists and many medical specialists. patients with this syndrome are often initially considered to have lymphoma or adult-onset Still disease, which are the main differential diagnoses. However, hypocomplementic urticarial vasculitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, cryoglobulinemia, acquired C1 inhibitor deficiency, hyper IgD syndrome, chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome, and Muckle-Wells syndrome should also be excluded, because diagnosis relies on a combination of clinical and biologic signs and there is no specific marker of the disease. The disease pursues a chronic course, and no remissions have yet been reported. Disabling skin rash, fever, and musculoskeletal involvement are the most frequent complications. Severe anemia of chronic disease is another serious complication. The most harmful complication, however, is evolution to an authentic lymphoplasmacytic malignancy, which occurs in at least 15% of patients. This hematologic transformation can occur more than 20 years after the first signs of the disease, thus patients deserve long-term follow-up. Treatment is symptomatic and unsatisfactory. The skin rash is unresponsive to treatment, and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, antihistamines, dapsone, colchicine, and psoralens and ultraviolet A (PUVA) therapy give inconstant results. fever, arthralgia, and bone pain often respond to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. In some patients, these symptoms and/or the presence of severe inflammatory anemia require steroids and/or immunosuppressive treatment, which ameliorate inflammatory symptoms but do not change the course of the skin rash.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/48. A case report of olanzapine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.

    hypersensitivity syndrome is defined as a drug-induced complex of symptoms consisting of fever, rash, and internal organ involvement. The hypersensitivity syndrome is well recognized as being caused by anticonvulsants. Olanzapine is an atypical antipsychotic agent whose side effects include sedation, weight gain, and increased creatinine kinase and transaminase levels. To date, there have been no reports of hypersensitivity syndrome related to this drug. A 34-year-old man developed a severe generalized pruritic skin eruption, fever, eosinophilia, and toxic hepatitis 60 days after ingestion of olanzapine. After termination of olanzapine treatment, the fever resolved, the skin rash was reduced, eosinophil count was reduced to normal, and the transaminase levels were markedly reduced. Clinical features and the results of skin and liver biopsies indicated that the patient developed hypersensitivity syndrome caused by olanzapine.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/48. Traditional tooth bud gouging in a Ugandan family: a report involving three sisters.

    It has been reported in the literature that some rural populations of Sub-Saharan and Eastern africa and other isolated areas around the world, practise gouging or enucleation of primary tooth buds to cure childhood illnesses. The unerupted primary canine tooth bud is believed to be the cause of febrile illness, diarrhoea, and vomiting; prevalent in infants in these areas of the world. tooth bud gouging has implications for the developing dentition, and is a potential risk to the health and life of the child. Reported prevalence ranges from 22%-90%. From the information in this case report, the practise of tooth bud gouging is no longer confined to rural areas and may well be performed by communities that have emigrated to the UK. The three sisters described, now resident in the UK, suffered tooth gouging in a city clinic in uganda. The damage caused to the primary and permanent dentition is described and treatment planning and options are suggested for each case to restore structure and function. Appropriate provision of healthcare and education could avoid the potential long-term damage to the health of the child and their developing dentition by the practise of tooth bud gouging, whether it occurs in the developing or developed world.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16847599521494
keywords = tooth
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/48. Management of a widely disseminated skin rash.

    T.J.'s case was interesting from the standpoint of both diagnosis and management. The recommended treatment for this drug reaction was prednisone: however, the use of a steroid in a patient who is neutropenic and has a fever is risky because the because the steroid can mask the symptoms of infection (e.g., fever). Administration of prednisone did help, and the patient experienced a rapid resolution of the skin rash. T.J. will need to avoid the use of these antibiotic agents in the future. Because it is unknown which antibiotic, vancomycin or ceftazidime, caused the allergic reaction, both medicines should be avoided. The decision to rechallenge a patient with a specific drug must be made on an individual basis. Rechallenging of a drug in patients who have had urticarial, bullous, or erythema multiforme-like eruptions can be very dangerous (Padial et al., 2000). Pinpointing the cause of a skin rash can be puzzling. Always ask the patient "Do you take any medicine for any condition (including aspirin, laxatives, vitamins, etc.)? Have you received any shots any shots in the last month?" Keep in mind that any chemical that is ingested can cause a cutaneous drug eruption.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/48. Extensive fixed drug eruption to nimesulide with cross-sensitivity to sulfonamides in a child.

    Nimesulide, a new nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with a favorable tolerability profile, is being used increasingly in pediatric practice. Its common side effects pertain to the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system. The common cutaneous adverse effects are pruritus and skin rash. Rarely purpura and fixed drug eruptions have also been observed in adults. We present herein a case of nimesulide-induced fixed drug eruption in a 10-year-old boy. The lesions were extensive and showed cross-sensitivity to sulfonamides.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/48. Sweet's syndrome: recurrent oral ulceration, pyrexia, thrombophlebitis, and cutaneous lesions.

    We report a case of Sweet's syndrome with recurrent oral ulceration, pyrexia, skin lesions, and migratory thrombophlebitis, with no detectable systemic cause, during a 2-year follow-up. biopsy examination both of oral lesions and the skin eruption showed a characteristic dense, perivascular, neutrophilic infiltrate in the lamina propria. Laboratory investigations confirmed an inflammatory syndrome with an increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate, but no underlying cause was found. Sweet's syndrome is a rare immunologically mediated condition that belongs to the group of neutrophilic dermatoses that must be differentiated particularly from Behcet's disease. It is characterized by red-brown plaques and nodules that are frequently painful and occur primarily on the head, neck, and upper extremities. Often the patients also have neutrophilia and fever and may have oral ulceration. In approximately 10% of patients with Sweet's syndrome, there is an associated malignancy--most commonly acute myelogenous leukemia--but some cases, as here, are unassociated with detectable malignant or other disease, although the syndrome may precede the onset of definable systemic disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/48. Sweet's syndrome associated with recurrent fever in a patient with trisomy 8 myelodysplastic syndrome.

    In the case of a 69-year-old man suffering from recurrent high fever, laboratory data demonstrated elevated inflammatory findings such as neutrophilic leukocytosis and an increase in serum level of c-reactive protein. A nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug or a low dose of prednisolone proved to be temporarily effective. A bone marrow specimen showed myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) of the refractory anemia (RA) type with trisomy 8. Seven months after onset, painful erythematous eruptions were found on both legs. biopsy of a skin lesion demonstrated neutrophic infiltration into the dermis. As a result, Sweet's syndrome (SS) was diagnosed on the basis of clinical and histopathological findings. Administration of prednisolone (30 mg/d) was started and resulted in prompt defervescence and resolution of the lesions within 1 week. We also investigated serum levels of 3 cytokines: interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Levels of IL-6 and G-CSF were elevated during the active phase, but the level of IL-1beta did not increase. Because cases of MDS with trisomy 8 and SS or Behcet disease have been reported recently, our findings suggested that cytokine production, which enhances neutrophil function, is elevated in some MDS patients with trisomy 8; that is, not only cytokines but also trisomy 8 may be related to the pathogenesis of SS in MDS. It is thus advisable to watch for development of SS during follow-up of MDS patients with recurrent fever or trisomy 8.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/48. Febrile ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann's disease managed with methylprednisolone semipulse and subsequent methotrexate therapies.

    Febrile ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann's disease is an unusual severe form of pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta characterized by abrupt onset of ulceronecrotic eruption associated with a high fever and systemic symptoms. To our knowledge, 19 cases of this disease have been reported in the literature, and 4 of them were fatal. We report the case of a 12-year-old boy with this disorder who had abdominal pain, hypoproteinemia, and anemia. Although these associated symptoms are considered life-threatening factors according to reported cases, our patient was successfully treated with methylprednisolone semipulse and subsequent methotrexate therapies. From a review of the literature and the present case, we propose that when patients have these systemic symptoms, therapeutic choices include methotrexate, high-dose corticosteroids, and 4,4-diamino-diphenyl-sulfone, which may depress early development of this disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = eruption
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Fever'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.