Cases reported "Fever of Unknown Origin"

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11/29. parvovirus B19 infection presenting as pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a transient and progressive course in two children.

    parvovirus B19 is the causative agent of various forms of hematologic diseases such as aplastic crisis in patients with hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, hypoplastic anemia, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. In addition, parvovirus B19 infection may precede or be associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The authors present two cases of parvovirus B19 infection and bone marrow infiltration with pre-B-cell lymphoblasts; one patients was diagnosed as having ALL, and the other patient, with neurologic findings, showed total resolution of the blastic morphology and phenotype.
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keywords = bone
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12/29. spinal cord Ewing's sarcoma metastasis: presentation of one case.

    Cervical spinal Ewing's sarcomas are rare and cause problems in diagnosis. We present an unusual case of a primary extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma arising from the spinal cord. An 18-year-old woman with fever, headache and back pain lasting one month was admitted to the hospital. Whole body bone scintigraphy was performed with 1110 MBq technetium-99m methylenediphosphonate. Scintigraphy clearly showed abnormal technetium-99m methylenediphosphonate accumulation in the level of the 5th and 6th cervical vertebrae. magnetic resonance imaging could also confirm this examination finding. After the scintigraphic study, the patient underwent surgery. Pathological diagnosis of the operation specimen was Ewing's sarcoma.
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keywords = bone
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13/29. Infantile cortical hyperostosis.

    Infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease) is characterized by radiological evidence of cortical hyperostosis, soft tissue swellings, fever and irritability. We report a case of Caffey disease highlighting its presentation as pyrexia of unknown origin, appearance on radionuclide bone scintigraphy and our unsatisfactory experience of treating it with ibuprofen, a prostaglandin inhibitor.
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14/29. fever of unknown origin: chronic lymphatic leukemia versus lymphoma (Richter's transformation).

    Currently, malignancies are more common than infections as a cause of fever of unknown origin (FUO) in adults. Many malignant disorders are associated with fever, which may either be of the hectic-septic variety resembling an infectious disease or prolonged and low-grade. neoplasms with either kind of fever may present as an FUO. The malignancies usually associated with fever are lymphoreticular malignancies involving the blood, liver, spleen, or bone marrow. Most malignancies do not have fever, e.g., chronic lymphatic leukemia (CLL), as part of their clinical presentation. We present a case of long-standing CLL in an elderly woman who presented with an FUO. Initially, it was thought that her FUO was caused by CLL or a CLL-related opportunistic infection. The naprosyn test was used in this patient with CLL and FUO to differentiate a malignant from an infectious etiology. Her response to naprosyn indicated that the etiology of her FUO was neoplastic rather than infectious. The absence of tonsillar enlargement and peripheral adenopathy, as well as the presence of fever, argued against CLL as the cause of her fever. Computed axial tomography scans showed central adenopathy in addition to splenomegaly. The presence of fever, splenomegaly, and central adenopathy indicated that the cause of her FUO was a lymphoma (Richter's transformation) and not CLL.
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15/29. Haemophagocytic syndrome presenting as pyrexia of unknown origin.

    Haemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) should be included in the differential diagnosis of pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO). The hallmark of HPS is the accumulation of activated macrophages that engulf haematopoietic cells in the reticuloendothelial system. We describe a patient with unexplained fever in which a final diagnosis of HPS was established in a bone marrow study.
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ranking = 31.297386964584
keywords = macrophage, bone
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16/29. fever of unknown origin due to preleukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome: the diagnostic importance of monocytosis with elevated serum ferritin levels.

    fever of unknown origin (FUO) is a common clinical diagnostic dilemma. In the elderly, causes of FUO most commonly include malignancy or infection, and less commonly include collagen vascular diseases. Among the collagen vascular diseases causing FUO in the elderly, polymyalgia rheumatica/temporal arteritis, and adult Still's disease (adult juvenile rheumatoid arthritis) are difficult diagnoses to prove. Among the infectious causes of FUO in the elderly are subacute bacterial endocarditis, intra-abdominal abscesses, and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. In the elderly, neoplastic causes of FUO include lymphomas, hepatomas, renal cell carcinomas, and hepatic or central nervous system metastases. Acute leukemias, particularly during "blast" transformation, may present as acute fevers in the absence of infection, but are rare causes of FUO. preleukemia/myelodysplastic syndromes are exceedingly rare causes of FUO. We present a case of an elderly man who presented with findings that initially suggested adult Still's disease. Prolonged and profound monocytosis provided the key clue to his subsequent diagnosis of preleukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome. In this patient, a positive Naprosyn test result also suggested a neoplastic cause for his FUO. After months of prolonged fevers, myelocytes/metamyelocytes were eventually demonstrated in his peripheral smear during hospital evaluation. These findings, in concert with the persistent monocytosis, highly elevated ferritin levels, polyclonal gammopathy on serum protein electrophoresis, and eventual presence of myelocytes/metamyelocytes on peripheral smear, prompted a bone marrow test that demonstrated blast cells confirming the diagnosis of preleukemia myelodysplastic syndrome as the cause of this patient's FUO.
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17/29. Unusual clinical presentation of malignant histiocytosis in a 70-year-old woman.

    A 70-year-old woman was admitted for evaluation of hepatosplenomegaly, fever and elevated serum LDH levels. A biopsy specimen of the liver revealed histiocytic proliferation at the portal triad, and a mild degree of hepatitis. A bone marrow biopsy specimen showed proliferation of histiocytes with minimal immaturity and atypism, and haemophagocytosis by the proliferated histiocytes. Fever, hepatosplenomegaly and elevation of LDH levels all disappeared spontaneously, and presumptive diagnosis of benign reticulosis with haemophagocytosis was made. One year later, fever, hepatosplenomegaly and elevation of LDH levels redeveloped, and the liver and bone marrow biopsy specimen showed proliferation of unequivocally malignant histiocytes. The patient died as a result of disseminated intravascular coagulation with shock 20 d later. We concluded that, in this case, malignant histiocytosis first presented as benign haemophagocytic reticulosis and, 1 year later, there was a typical malignant presentation.
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keywords = bone
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18/29. Visceral bacillary epithelioid angiomatosis: possible manifestations of disseminated cat scratch disease in the immunocompromised host: a report of two cases.

    Opportunistic infection with the causative agent of cat scratch disease may be responsible for an unusual vascular proliferative lesion, referred to as bacillary epithelioid angiomatosis, previously described only in human immunodeficiency virus (hiv)-infected patients. We present a case of an hiv-infected patient with bacillary epithelioid angiomatosis involving the liver and bone marrow causing progressive hepatic failure. We also report a case of a cardiac transplant recipient with hepatic and splenic bacillary epithelioid angiomatosis manifesting as a fever of unknown origin, a previously unreported event in a non-hiv-infected patient. These cases represent the first documentation of bacillary epithelioid angiomatosis with visualization of cat scratch-like organisms involving internal organs.
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keywords = bone
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19/29. Incidental diagnosis of pregnancy on bone and gallium scintigraphy.

    Bone and gallium scintigraphy were performed as part of the diagnostic workup of a 21-yr-old woman who presented at our institution with a history of progressively worsening low back pain over a 1-wk period of time. The angiographic phase of the bone scan demonstrated a well-defined radionuclide blush within the pelvis just cephalad to the urinary bladder with persistent hyperemia noted in the blood-pool image. We attribute these findings to a uterine blush secondary to the pronounced uterine muscular hyperplasia, hyperemia, and edema that accompany pregnancy. gallium scintigraphy demonstrated intense bilateral breast accumulation of the imaging agent in a typical doughnut pattern which is commonly found in the prelactating and lactating breast. Also demonstrated was apparent gallium accumulation in the placenta. This case is presented to emphasize the radionuclide findings that occur during pregnancy, particularly the incidental finding of radionuclide blush during the angiographic phase of a radionuclide scintigraphy which should alert the nuclear physician to the possibility of pregnancy in a woman of childbearing age.
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keywords = bone
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20/29. Kikuchi's necrotizing lymphadenitis: a cause of fever of unknown origin and splenomegaly.

    Kikuchi's disease is characterized by lymphadenopathy in young patients and may be mistaken for malignant disease both clinically and histologically. We report the case of a 26-year-old man with persistent fever for 3 weeks and splenomegaly, in whom pancytopenia developed afterwards. A bone marrow aspiration was normal. blood, urine, throat, stool and bone marrow cultures were negative as were serological tests for lues, toxoplasma, Epstein-Barr virus and Widal's test. An abdominal CT scan showed enlarged retroperitoneal lymph nodes and an exploratory laparotomy was performed. Two lymph nodes were excised and a wedge biopsy of the liver was performed. The histological findings in the lymph nodes were compatible with the diagnosis of Kikuchi's disease. The patient became afebrile on the 2nd postoperative day without any treatment. He has been well for 4 months after discharge.
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keywords = bone
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