Cases reported "Fibroma"

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1/25. exophthalmos, pretibial myxedema, osteoarthropathy syndrome associated with papillary fibroelastoma in the left ventricle.

    EMO syndrome, a rare complication of Graves' disease, exhibits exophthalmos, pretibial myxedema, and osteoarthropathy. The presence of functional thyrotropin receptors (TSHR) in adipocytes and osteoblasts, both of which we have recently observed, may be related to these extrathyroidal manifestations of Graves' disease. In addition, the expression of TSHR in the heart has recently been reported. We describe here a patient with Graves' disease exhibiting EMO syndrome with a papillary fibroelastoma in the left ventricle. Pathological examinations showed that the fibroelastoma contained alcian blue-stained mucinous materials that were also observed in the subcutaneous tissue of pretibial myxedema.
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keywords = tibia
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2/25. Translocation (1;4)(p31;q34) in nonossifying fibroma.

    Nonossifying fibroma is a benign, lytic lesion of fibrous origin most often observed in the metaphyseal region of the long bones in children and adolescents. It is frequently asymptomatic and is often characterized by a history of spontaneous resolution. Herein, we report a clinicohistopathologically typical case of nonossifying fibroma arising in the tibia of an 18-year-old skeletally mature female. Conventional cytogenetic analysis revealed a reciprocal translocation involving bands 1p31 and 4q34 [t(1;4)(p31;q34)]. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of a clonally aberrant nonossifying fibroma.
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keywords = tibia
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3/25. Fibromatosis of the hand associated with EMO syndrome: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: EMO syndrome, defined as a triad including exophthalmus, pretibial myxedema and osteoarthropathia, is a rare condition in patients suffering from hyperthyreosis. CASE PRESENTATION: We here describe an interesting case of EMO syndrome associated with unilateral fibromatosis of the hand and an initial stage of generalized myxedema of the skin. To our knowledge a similar case has not yet been described in literature though reports about associated fibromatosis, e.g. located retroperitoneally, already exist. Familiar explanations include its initiation by autoimmune processes or aberrant T-cell cytokine stimulation leading to an overwhelming production of glycosaminoglycans. CONCLUSION: Interpreting our case in context with previous reports we conclude that associated fibromatosis induced by autoimmune processes may affect a variety of different localizations and therefore requires careful monitoring. A therapeutical attempt by using UVA1 irridation for pretibial myxedema remained without a satisfying regression.
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keywords = tibia
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4/25. Eyelid tumour and juvenile hyaline fibromatosis.

    We report the case of a 2-year-old boy suffering from juvenile hyaline fibromatosis. Our patient had all the main clinical features of the disease, i.e. multiple cutaneous facial nodules, gingival fibromatosis and osteolytic lesions in the proximal metaphysis of the tibia and humerus symmetrically. However, he also presented an eyelid tumour scalloping the superior orbital osseous rim, causing blepharoptosis. The histopathology confirmed this very rare condition. After 6 months, our patient has improved functionally and cosmetically following surgical resection of the eyelid tumours without recurrence.
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keywords = tibia
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5/25. Osteofibrous dysplasia (ossifying fibroma of long bones). A report of four cases and review of the literature.

    Osteofibrous dysplasia (ossifying fibroma of long bones) is a rare fibroosseous lesion. Only about 64 cases have been reported in the English literature. It is most commonly found in the tibia and fibula of a child ten years of age or younger. Of the four cases reported in this study, however, only one patient was younger than ten years of age. In two cases, the lesions were unusually located in the radius and ulna respectively. The other two cases had the usual tibial involvement. The last case had two recurrences after curettage before the patient was ten years of age. The other three patients who were treated after the age of 18 years had uneventful healing, one after wide resection and two after curettage. Extensive histologic examination and immunostaining for keratin were performed in all cases. No epithelioid cells were found. Because of a high recurrence rate after curettage, the treatment of this disease in a child should be conservative if the diagnosis is confirmed by biopsy. Only curettage with bone grafting is necessary for those patients older than 15 years of age with symptomatic lesions.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = tibia
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6/25. Periosteal chondromyxoid fibroma: a case study using imprint cytology.

    Bone surface is an exceptional location for chondromyxoid fibroma. Only 14 cases of juxtacortical chondromyxoid fibroma have been reported to date and, to our knowledge, none of these cases are documented with imprint cytology. We report a case of periosteal chondromyxoid fibroma located in the distal tibial metaphysis of a 4-yr-old boy. The clinical diagnosis was metaphyseal fibrous defect. Cytologic examination revealed a mixoid matrix, with stellate and spindle-shaped cells seen singly, focus of chondroid material, and epithelioid cells. Multinucleate giant cells were not seen. The diagnosis of periosteal chondromyxoid fibroma can be made by fine-needle aspiration or imprint cytology with clinico-radiologic correlation.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = tibia
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7/25. Congenital ossifying fibroma (osteofibrous dysplasia) of the tibia--a case report.

    Ossifying fibromas of the long bones of the leg are benign lesions occurring in the pediatric age group identical in histological appearance to the similarly named tumor of the jaw in adults. Most frequently presentation occurs after minor trauma with symptoms of a swelling of the tibia or fibula which may be painful. Pathological fracture or limp are also occasional presentations. Congenital cases are extremely rare. We describe an otherwise normal male neonate who presented at birth with a bowed right lower leg. The limb was 1 cm shorter than the other side, with tibia vara and a firm mass situated anteriorly. X-ray showed a mixed lytic and sclerotic lesion in the proximal metaphysis of the tibia. biopsy showed collagenous stroma containing spindle cells and irregular trabeculae of woven bone rimmed by plump osteoblasts. As the appearances were typical of an ossifying fibroma (osteofibrous dysplasia) no surgical treatment was given. The patient was well with no growth of the tumor and with radiological evidence of healing at 1 year follow up. This case is presented to draw attention to the clinicopathological features of this unusual lesion which must be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital lesions of the tibia.
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ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = tibia
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8/25. Case report 695: Cementifying fibroma of the proximal end of the tibia.

    A case of a cementifying fibroma in the proximal end of the tibia in a 31-year-old woman is presented. The lesion was expanding but well-defined with amorphous central calcification. The unique, calcified, cementum-like particles in a fibrous stroma have been reported in only four previous cases in long bones. The histological and radiographic differences between a cementifying fibroma, bone cysts with cementum, and a true cementoma are discussed. The radiological differential diagnosis of fibrous dysplasia, giant cell tumor, and low grade central osteosarcoma was considered.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = tibia
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9/25. Ossifying fibroma.

    Our experience includes seven cases of ossifying fibroma. The condition also appears in the literature under diagnostic names such as congenital fibrous dysplasia, congenital osteitis fibrosa, congenital fibrous defect of the tibia, and osteofibrous dysplasia of the tibia and fibula. The lesions develop in childhood and are located in the diaphysis of the tibia, or fibula. Of seven patients, we performed wide excision with free vascularized fibular graft in five cases, wide resection of the distal one-third of the fibula in one case, and curettage and bone graft in one case. Two of the patients who had wide excision with free vascularized fibular graft had recurrence. One case of recurrence occurred where incomplete wide excision with free-vascularized fibular graft was performed because the lesion was too close to the distal epiphysis of the tibia. One of the patients who had curettage and bone graft also had recurrence. It was concluded that children who have an ossifying fibroma requiring surgery can safely be treated with wide excision with or without free-vascularized fibular graft.
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keywords = tibia
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10/25. Healing of a large nonossifying fibroma after grafting with bone matrix and marrow. A case report.

    Healing of a large tibial nonossifying fibroma in a 12-year-old girl occurred following excision, curettage, and filling of the bony defect with human demineralized bone matrix powder mixed with a small quantity of the patient's bone marrow. The use of this graft composite was successful in the treatment of the lesion and reduced the potential risk and morbidity associated with pediatric orthopedic surgical procedures with autogeneic iliac crest and other bone grafts.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = tibia
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