Cases reported "Fibromatosis, Gingival"

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1/65. Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis: clinical heterogeneity in three patients.

    BACKGROUND: Systemic hyalinoses are genetic generalized fibromatoses characterized by an accumulation of hyalin in the dermis. Two distinctive syndromes are recognized in the literature: infantile systemic hyalinosis (ISH) and juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF). ISH and JHF are sometimes difficult to separate since they show significant overlap. OBSERVATIONS: We report on 3 children from two unrelated families suffering from JHF. The first child is severely handicapped by joint contracture, massive hyperplasia of the gingivae, diffuse skin papules and subcutaneous nodules occupying the scalp, face, perianal area, palms, soles and chest. At the same age, the second child only shows pearly skin papules on the face, groin and perianal area and gingival hyperplasia without joint stiffness or any other subjective complaint. The third patient, a brother of the second child, developed mild skin abnormalities by the end of the first year. The occurrence in siblings and consanguinity in the second family suggests autosomal recessive inheritance. Histological skin examination in the 3 cases showed hyaline deposition in the dermis and abnormal ultrastructure of fibroblasts. Biochemical findings showed mucopolysaccharide abnormalities in both families. CONCLUSION: Our patients do not only illustrate the different expressions of JHF but also show some overlap with ISH, suggesting a common cause for both disorders. Genetic studies will finally answer this question.
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keywords = gingival
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2/65. Gingival fibromatosis combined with cherubism and psychomotor retardation: a rare syndrome.

    Gingival fibromatosis is frequently an isolated condition, but rarely associated with some uncommon syndromes. This paper describes an 11-year-old patient with pronounced gingival enlargement, cherubic facial appearance, and psychomotor retardation and discusses the major aspects of the case. The most striking finding orally was the presence of grossly hyperplastic gingiva, which completely covered all teeth except the occlusal surfaces of some teeth. The swelling in the lower part of the face and the appearance of sclera beneath the iris suggest cherubism. The diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of giant cell regenerative granuloma and perivascular eosinophilic particles and osteoclasts after biopsy of the mandible. In this case, surgery was the only effective way to treat the patient. A full-mouth gingivectomy procedure was performed under general anesthesia in 2 stages. The case was followed for 12 months and no recurrence was seen. An appropriate oral hygiene regimen was established.
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keywords = gingival
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3/65. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis: review of the literature and a case report.

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is a proliferative fibrous lesion of the gingival tissue that causes esthetic and functional problems. Both genetically and pharmacologically induced forms of gingival fibromatosis exist. This paper reports a case of severe generalized hereditary gingival fibromatosis in a 5-year-old girl. Treatment consisted of surgical removal of the hyperplastic fibrous tissue in a series of conventional gingivectomies. Postoperative examination 36 months after the final procedure revealed no signs of recurrence.
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keywords = gingival
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4/65. Two siblings with juvenile hyaline fibromatosis: case reports and review of the literature.

    In this paper, we describe two siblings with Juvenile Hyaline Fibromatosis (JHF) who were diagnosed at the age of 34 and 29 years respectively. JHF is a very congenital disease, mainly diagnosed in the first few years of life, with less than 40 published cases in literature. All the main clinical features of this syndrome, which may be summarised as multiple subcutaneous tumours, marked gingival hypertrophy, flexion contractures and osteolytic lesions were present in both of these cases. Clinical, radiological and histological differential diagnosis of JHF were made. Recent information about histopathology, treatment and prognosis of JHF was also reviewed.
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keywords = gingival
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5/65. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis: report of three cases.

    Three cases of generalized and severe HGF in young patients of the same family without other features are reported. The purpose of this article is to present documented cases and discuss the identification, treatment, and control of the disease. The histopathological characteristics of HGF are emphasized.
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ranking = 4
keywords = gingival
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6/65. A new locus for hereditary gingival fibromatosis (GINGF2) maps to 5q13-q22.

    Gingival fibromatosis (GINGF) is an oral disorder characterized by enlargement of the gingiva. It occurs either as the sole phenotype or combined with other symptoms. Thus far, one GINGF locus has been mapped on chromosome 2, at 2p21, and a second possible locus has been mapped to 2p13. However, the genes responsible for this disorder have not been elucidated. We identified a four-generation Chinese GINGF family in which the disease manifests within 1 year after birth. After exclusion of the two known GINGF loci in this family, we performed a genome-wide search to map the chromosome location of the responsible gene. We identified a new locus, GINGF2, on chromosome 5q13-q22 with a maximum two-point lod score of 4.31 at D5S1721 (theta = 0.00). Haplotype analysis placed the critical region in the interval defined by D5S1491 and D5S1453. Within this region, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMK4) is a strong candidate.
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ranking = 4
keywords = gingival
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7/65. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis and growth retardation.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe two patients with hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) and growth hormone deficiency and to review the literature on HGF and related endocrine abnormalities. methods: We present case reports of two patients (first cousins)-an 8-year-old girl and a 13-year-old boy-with an existing diagnosis of HGF, who were assessed because of presumed growth failure. Both patients underwent growth hormone stimulation testing and more in-depth endocrine evaluation, including measurement of morning cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and prolactin levels as well as thyroid function tests. An ACTH stimulation test was also performed. Radiologic evaluation included assessment of bone age and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. RESULTS: In addition to HGF, both patients had short stature, subnormal growth velocity, and delayed bone age but no abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. serum prolactin levels and results of thyroid function tests were normal. Subnormal growth hormone response was noted during hypoglycemia and pharmacologic stimuli with clonidine and levodopa. The female patient, who also had recurrent hypoglycemic episodes, had a suboptimal cortisol and ACTH response during hypoglycemia. On the ACTH stimulation test, she showed an inadequate cortisol response at 30 minutes but a normal response at 60 minutes. The male patient had normal morning cortisol and ACTH levels plus a normal response to ACTH stimulation. Both patients are responding well to treatment with growth hormone. The girl is also receiving cortisol replacement and has had no further episodes of hypoglycemia. CONCLUSION: Although HGF has been described as an isolated finding, it can occur as part of a syndrome, including infrequent endocrine abnormalities such as growth hormone insufficiency. The cause of the growth hormone deficiency remains unclear in these two patients. We believe that patients with HGF should be monitored carefully for a prolonged period for growth as well as other endocrine abnormalities.
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ranking = 5
keywords = gingival
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8/65. Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis.

    Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) is a rare autosomal recessive disease with onset in infancy or early childhood. It is characterized by papulonodular skin lesions, soft tissue masses, gingival hypertrophy, and flexion contractures of the large joints. The light and electron microscopic features are very distinctive. Here we report an 8-month-old boy with characteristic stiffness of the knees and elbows and pink confluent papules on the paranasal folds, and periauricular and perianal regions. He also had hard nodules all over the scalp and around the mouth, and severe gingival hypertrophy. Histologic and ultrastructural features were typical of JHF. Clinical features, pathology, and physiology are discussed.
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ranking = 2
keywords = gingival
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9/65. Long-term management of an idiopathic gingival fibromatosis patient with the primary dentition.

    Gingival fibromatosis is usually seen as an isolated finding or occasionally in association with other features as part of a syndrome. The combination of gingival enlargement, hypertrichosis, epilepsy and mental retardation is also a commonly reported syndrome that features gingival fibromatosis. The following report is about a mentally retarded patient who has shown no sign of hypertrichosis, but has been taking phenobarbital as a long-term therapy drug for anti-convulsion. Long-term management of this patient has been carried out from the age of one-and-a-half years to 14 years old. The patient's clinical features, treatment received, histopathologic presentation of gingival fibromatosis and proper management of the condition are discussed.
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ranking = 7
keywords = gingival
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10/65. Treatment and long-term follow-up of a patient with hereditary gingival fibromatosis: a case report.

    This report addresses the complex nature of oral diagnosis, treatment and long-term case management in the hereditary form of recurrent gingival fibromatosis. case management is discussed in relation to a 13-year-old girl who presented with recurrent, progressive gingival enlargement requiring consecutive periodontal and orthodontic treatment. The initial course of treatment included 4-quadrant gingivectomy with reverse bevel incisions, followed by orthodontics. Microscopic examination of the gingivectomy specimens supported the clinical diagnosis. Three years later, recurrence of the condition was observed in all quadrants. To facilitate orthodontic tooth movement and to achieve optimal esthetics, another full-mouth gingivectomy was performed. There was no recurrence of the condition a year later. It is recommended that patients with this condition be monitored closely after gingivectomy, so that the treatment requirements of localized areas can be addressed as needed.
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ranking = 6
keywords = gingival
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