Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/8. Osteofibrous dysplasia of the tibia: case report and review of the literature.

    A case of osteofibrous dysplasia (OFD) of the tibia with 10 years of follow-up is presented. Spontaneous healing of this lesion occurred without any surgical intervention at the age of 10 years. The diagnosis was made retrospectively on the basis of clinical and radiographic appearance and evolution. The capricious nature and indolent course of this neoplasm has led to uncertainty regarding its etiology, evolution, and treatment. A review of the literature and the ongoing discussion about this matter is presented.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/8. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia of the sphenoid sinus: a serendipitous finding on a bone scan.

    A 22-year-old woman had a Tc-99m MDP whole-body scan for low back pain. A focal area of increased activity was seen in the skull base in the region of the sella turcica. A computed tomographic examination showed ground-glass opacification of the sphenoid sinus and bony sclerosis along its walls, characteristic of fibrous dysplasia. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia, the more common form compared with the polyostotic variety, occurs in 70% to 80% of all patients with fibrous dysplasia. Monostotic lesions usually involve the ribs, femur, tibia, cranium, maxilla, and mandible. The frontal and sphenoid bones are the cranial bones most commonly involved.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/8. magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of monostotic fibrous dysplasia of the tibia.

    The authors present a case report documenting the evaluation of monostotic fibrous dysplasia by magnetic resonance imaging. This type of evaluation demonstrates specificity for this disease process when combined with other imaging studies, laboratory findings, and clinical presentation. This technique is extremely useful in the identification of a no-touch lesion, allowing avoidance of an unnecessary bone biopsy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.8
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/8. Immunoexpression of neurofibromin, S-100 protein, and leu-7 and mutation analysis of the NF1 gene at codon 1423 in osteofibrous dysplasia.

    The NF1 (neurofibromatosis type 1, or von Recklinghausen disease) gene, is a tumor-suppressor gene, and its product, neurofibromin, down-regulates ras protein by its guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein (GAP)-related domain. Osteofibrous dysplasia (OFD) is characterized by fibroblast-like spindle cells and osseous tissue and is generally seen in the tibia or fibula during childhood. The precise nature of OFD remains controversial. Cosegregations of OFD and NF1 have been reported, and it has been surmised that OFD is associated with the NF1 gene. We studied the expressions of NF1 gene product (neurofibromin) and so-called Schwann cell markers (S-100 protein, Leu-7) in 17 cases of OFD immunohistochemically. Ten cases of fibrous dysplasia (FD) were also used for the purpose of comparison. Five OFD and 7 FD cases were analyzed for NF1 gene mutation at codon 1423, which is a GAP-related domain, by single-strand conformation polymorphism. Fibroblast-like cells of OFD showed the expression of neurofibromin (5 of 17), S-100 protein (9 of 17), and Leu-7 (5 of 17), and those of FD did not show these expressions, with the exception of 1 case that showed Leu-7 expression. Regarding the OFD cases, significant correspondence was found between cases showing expression of neurofibromin and S-100 protein, between cases showing expression of neurofibromin and Leu-7, and between cases showing expression of S-100 protein and Leu-7 (P < .01). NF1 gene mutation at codon 1423 was not detected in either the OFD (0 of 5) or FD (0 of 7) cases. These results seem to suggest the possible involvement of neurofibromin in the development of OFD, which is associated with the expression of Schwann cell markers (S-100 protein and Leu-7). Furthermore, NF1 gene mutation at codon 1423 did not seem to be related to OFD.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/8. Ossifying fibroma of the long bones. Radiological diagnosis, differential diagnosis and management implications.

    We report a case of ossifying fibroma of the long bones (OFLB). This lesion, occurring mainly during the first decade of life, typically affects the tibial diaphysis and clinically presents as a painless bony enlargement. Radiographic features include an osteolytic cortical expansion, containing diffuse calcifications, and separated from the medullary by a thick cortical rim. CT appears to be the examination of choice to define these signs and permits differentiation from monostotic fibrous dysplasia and from adamantinoma (by demonstrating the presence or absence of diffuse high attenuation values). The importance of making the differential diagnosis is stressed, as prognosis and management of OFLB, fibrous dysplasia and adamantinoma may vary considerably.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/8. tibia vara caused by focal fibrocartilaginous dysplasia. Three case reports.

    We present three cases of a previously undescribed condition characterised by unilateral tibia vara associated with an area of focal fibrocartilaginous dysplasia in the medial aspect of the proximal tibia. The three children affected were aged 9, 15 and 27 months respectively. Two required tibial osteotomy, but in one the deformity resolved without treatment. The pathogenesis of the focal lesion remains conjectural; the most likely explanation is that the mesenchymal anlage of the tibial metaphysis has, for unknown reasons, developed abnormally at the insertion of the pes anserinus.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.8
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/8. A variant of fibrous dysplasia (osteofibrous dysplasia).

    We are reporting the cases of five patients with a tumor-like lesion that has recently been called osteofibrous dysplasia but has also been called osteogenic fibroma, monostotic cortical fibrous dysplasia, and a variant of fibrous dysplasia. The lesions in our patients developed in childhood and were located in the diaphysis of the tibia, which was bowed anteriorly. The structural stability of the limb was not affected. In four patients the lesion recurred after a biopsy and curettage was performed in childhood. No further surgical procedure was done until the patients reached skeletal maturity. The lesion in one patient was biopsied at the age of twenty-one years. No subsequent treatment was recommended.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/8. MRI of focal fibrocartilaginous dysplasia.

    Focal fibrocartilaginous dysplasia (FFCD) is an uncommon, benign condition associated with unilateral tibia vara in young children. The clinical, pathologic, plain film, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of FFCD were reviewed in two children. MRI findings were virtually identical in both patients and correlated well with the plain film and pathologic findings. We believe that FFCD has a typical MRI appearance. However, FFCD also has characteristic plain film findings, and when these are present, MRI is indicated for only an atypical clinical presentation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Fibrous Dysplasia, Monostotic'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.