Cases reported "Finger Injuries"

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1/5. Pasteurella canis osteomyelitis and cutaneous abscess after a domestic dog bite.

    The genus Pasteurella is part of the normal oral flora of many animals, including domestic cats and dogs. In humans, Pasteurella may cause complications ranging from cellulitis to septicemia but rarely causes osteomyelitis or septic arthritis after bites and/or scratches by cats and dogs. Although pasteurella multocida is a common cause of infection, other Pasteurella species have also been cultured from wounds in humans. We describe here, a case of a cutaneous abscess and acute osteomyelitis associated with P canis after a domestic dog bite. To our knowledge, no previous case of P canis has been reported as the cause of acute osteomyelitis in humans.
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keywords = animal
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2/5. An unusual farm injury: divergent carpometacarpal joint dislocations.

    This paper reports a farm accident by an animal causing an extremely rare divergent dislocation of the four carpometacarpal joints.
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keywords = animal
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3/5. pasteurella multocida wound infections--a commonly unrecognized problem in the casualty department.

    Wounds inflicted by animal bites are a common cause of attendance at casualty units. Many of these injuries are of little consequence, but if they are inappropriately treated, serious consequences can ensue. pasteurella multocida is a common contaminant of wounds inflicted by domestic animals, in particular cats. We report here a series of six severe P. multocida wound infections, and refer to the current literature on the subject. Strains of P. multocida isolated from some wounds failed to respond to conventional chemotherapy with penicillin.
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ranking = 2
keywords = animal
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4/5. A new method for venous interposition grafts using fibrin glue.

    We developed a new technique of venous interposition graft where the principle of sleeve anastomosis was applied at the proximal suture site and fibrin glue was used at both suture sites to prevent leakage. An advantage of this procedure was a reduction in the number of stitches, which reduced operative time and obtained good vascular healing. Since in an animal experiment a high patency rate of 97% was obtained, we applied the procedure to a clinical case with complete amputation at the PIP joint level of a long finger. Good recirculation was seen on angiography 6 weeks postoperatively.
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keywords = animal
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5/5. Veterinary high pressure injection injuries with inoculations for larger animals.

    Equipment used in the mass vaccination of farm stock is a source of high pressure injection injury. We present four cases due to chicken vaccine, and one due to pig vaccine. Unlike injuries caused by paint or oil guns the vaccination delivers a fixed volume. Although the vaccine is in a mineral oil carrier it appears to elicit little inflammatory reaction in a small dose. The outcome is related to the volume injected. In chicken vaccine the dose is small enough to allow conservative or minimally invasive management. The large volume in pig vaccine requires treatment as for conventional high pressure injection injuries.
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ranking = 4
keywords = animal
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