Cases reported "Finger Injuries"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/29. Ring finger ray amputation: a 25-year follow-up.

    The treatment of class III ring avulsion injuries remains controversial. This case report presents a 25-year follow-up of a class III ring avulsion injury treated with secondary ring finger ray amputation. This case shows long-term excellent functional and cosmetic results of ring finger ray resection without bony transposition.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/29. bone resorption of the proximal phalanx after tendon pulley reconstruction.

    A 35-year-old male worker sustained a degloving injury of the left hand. An abdominal flap was used for skin coverage. Tenolysis and reconstruction of the A2 pulley was done using a procedure based on the 3-loop technique, which was modified by putting the tendon loop under the extensor apparatus and periosteum. X-ray revealed hourglass-shaped bone resorption around the proximal phalanx, just under the reconstructed pulley. Diaphyseal narrowing remained present in follow-up x-rays obtained 9 and 10 years later. The remodeling of the resorption was poor. Too much pressure may have caused this bone resorption from the shortened pulley and the circulatory deprivation may have been caused by the dissected periosteum and blocking by the surrounding tendon loop. The degloving injury, which also deprived the digits of a blood supply, may have been an additional underlying risk factor. We recommend that future comparative studies of pulley reconstruction take into account mechanical effectiveness as well as force distribution.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.333536047665
keywords = ray, x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/29. amputation of the middle ray in the primary treatment of severe injuries of the central hand.

    Severe injury to the middle finger often compromises both the appearance and function of the hand. This report discusses the use of total middle ray amputation at the time of primary trauma surgery to avoid predictable problems that arise when the ray, or part of it, is retained. Primary ray amputation eliminates the defective middle finger, avoids a gap hand, and reunites the dissociated radial and ulnar segments of the hand to create a useful, three-fingered hand.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.1666666666667
keywords = ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/29. Radiological findings of accidental radiation injury of the fingers: a case report.

    This case report describes the medical follow-up of a 46-y-old (at the time of exposure) man who in 1971 accidentally exposed the fingers of his right hand to gamma-ray radiation from an iridium source that was used for nondestructive testing [estimated radiation dose: 26 Gy to 90 Gy (2,600 rad to 9,000 rad)]. No prominent acute injury was detected except for leukocytopenia (800 mm(-3)) and thrombocytopenia (15,000 mm(-3)). Three years later, the first, second, and third fingers presented repeated infection and started to develop contracture. Twenty-two years after exposure, he underwent amputation of the first and second fingers, and a toe graft was done. Radiological examinations prior to and following the operation revealed atrophic change of the finger bones and arterial injuries. Angiographic findings coincided with the region and extent of radiation injury of the fingers, which indicates that arterial damage is involved in the development of this chronic disorder.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/29. Ulnopalmar dislocation of the fifth carpometacarpal joint. A rare injury.

    Volar dislocation of the carpometacarpal joint of the little finger is an uncommon injury. It is subdivided in ulnopalmar and radiopalmar dislocations. The injury can easily be missed on standard x-rays. Closed reduction and K-wire fixation has commonly been used in the treatment, although closed reduction and casting has been reported. Only 10 cases of an ulnopalmar dislocation were published previously. We report a case of a simultaneous dislocation of the 4th metacarpophalangeal joint and an ulnopalmar dislocation of the 5th carpometacarpal joint. The combination of these injuries has not been reported yet. We review the available literature and discuss the methods of treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16686938099833
keywords = ray, x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/29. Misleading fractures after profundus tendon avulsions: a report of six cases.

    From 1986 to 1990, twelve patients were treated for avulsions of the flexor digitorum profundus in either the ring or the long finger. Six patients had misleading x-ray films because the tendon had retracted farther than the fracture pattern had suggested. All of these patients had avulsion fractures from the palmar aspect of the distal phalanx. Although the classification of Leddy and Packer is very helpful in determining the prognosis for these injuries, the fracture patterns are not reliable in predicting the location of the retracted tendon end preoperatively. Therefore all flexor digitorum profundus tendon avulsions should be surgically repaired as soon as possible.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16686938099833
keywords = ray, x-ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/29. Spindle cell haemangioendothelioma in an arteriovenous fistula of the ring finger after blunt trauma.

    We present a case of traumatic arteriovenous fistula of the palm and ring finger, which posed management dilemmas and eventually necessitated ray amputation. Subsequent histology revealed a spindle cell haemangioendothelioma that had developed within the fistula. We report the clinical features and management of this patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/29. The neglected rupture of deep transverse metacarpal ligament.

    The deep transverse metacarpal ligament (DTML) extends in radio-ulnar direction between the palmar plates of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of the second through fifth finger rays. On the radial aspect of the index and the ulnar aspect of the small fingers, the ligament merges with the collateral ligament of the MCP joints. The ligament has palmar grooves for the flexor tendons at the MCP joints and act as a support for the metacarpal arch. Closed DTML injury is an unusual case, but the physical findings of DTML injury are a decrease in grip strength, deviation of the finger in flexion and pain on the affected site of the hand. We have experienced a case of neglected DTML injury of left third interdigital space in a 23-year-old man.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/29. High-pressure injection injuries of the hand.

    Various types of high-pressure equipment, including airless paint sprayers, hydraulic apparatus and grease guns, are used in industry, in farming and in the home. Injection injuries from this equipment usually involve the hand and may initially appear benign. However, these injuries must be treated quickly and aggressively to prevent significant long-term disability.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/29. Post-traumatic rupture of the extensor digitorum communis tendon.

    A case of post-traumatic rupture of the common extensor tendon without associated fracture is reported. The extensor digitorum communis tendon to the middle finger was frayed by the distal edge of the extensor retinaculum at the fourth dorsal compartment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Finger Injuries'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.