Cases reported "Fistula"

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1/96. A de novo discharging sinus of the fronto-orbital suture: a rare presentation of a dermoid cyst.

    Dermoid cysts are developmental anomalies, resulting primarily from trapped germinal epithelium. In the neck and head region, the most common location is the fronto-orbital upper outer quadrant of the orbit. Because only a few cases of dermoid cysts with discharging sinus of the fronto-orbital area have been reported in the literature, the authors present an unusual case of a frontozygomatic suture dermoid cyst, presenting as a sinus, in an 56-year-old man. The histologic report confirmed that the cystic lesion was a dermoid cyst with a tract. Diagnosis and management are discussed.
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keywords = neck
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2/96. The use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor to promote wound healing in a neutropenic patient after head and neck surgery.

    BACKGROUND: neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction, in association with a variety of diseases, has been shown to play a role in poor wound healing. Wound breakdown with fistula formation in patients undergoing total laryngectomy results in significant morbidity and increased hospital stay. Although malnutrition, prior radiation, diabetes, and other diseases are recognized as factors predisposing patients with head and neck cancer to developing fistulas, neutrophil dysfunction should also be considered. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been used successfully to treat neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction. methods: This study was conducted as a case report. RESULTS: We present the first report of a neutropenic head and neck cancer patient with a persistent wound of 6 months' duration who showed dramatic improvement after treatment with G-CSF. CONCLUSION: We conclude that G-CSF may represent a useful adjunct in patients with persistent wound healing problems and neutropenia despite adequate treatment by conventional means. Further clinical experience with G-CSF in patients with delayed healing is indicated.
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ranking = 6
keywords = neck
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3/96. Recurrent acute suppurative thyroiditis in a child: case report.

    A 23-month-old girl presented with a history of persistent fever and growing left anterior neck mass following an upper respiratory tract infection. Laboratory studies revealed leukocytosis, elevated levels of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and c-reactive protein, and a mild impairment of thyroid function. Thyroid scan showed a decreased radioactive iodine uptake of the left thyroid gland. culture of the thyroid aspirate grew the mixed flora, viridans streptococci, prevotella spp, and peptostreptococcus magnus. She was discharged after a surgical drainage and a 14-day course of penicillin-G therapy. Unfortunately, she was readmitted for the resembling problems, the fever and progressing left anterior neck mass 3 months later. culture of thyroid aspirate also grew the viridans streptococci. She recovered after a 14-day course of penicillin-G therapy. A left pyriform sinus fistula was found by barium esophagogram. A selective operation was performed 8 weeks later.
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ranking = 2
keywords = neck
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4/96. Tracheocarotid artery fistula infected with methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus.

    Massive life-threatening haemorrhage from a fistula between the trachea and a major blood vessel of the neck is a rare complication of the tracheostomy procedure, well-recognized by anaesthetists and otolaryngologists. Although the lesion is likely to be encountered at autopsy, it is not described in histopathological literature. The possible causes are discussed together with the macroscopic and microscopic appearances of the lesion. Suitable procedures for its identification and for obtaining appropriate histopathological blocks are suggested. Presence of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has not been documented before and might have contributed to the genesis of the fistula in this case.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neck
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5/96. Possibilities of preventing osteoradionecrosis during complex therapy of tumors of the oral cavity.

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of tumors of the head and neck. Their successful treatment is one of the greatest challenges for physicians dealing with oncotherapy. An organic part of the complex therapy is preoperative or postoperative irradiation. Application of this is accompanied by a lower risk of recurrences, and by a higher proportion of cured patients. Unfortunately, irradiation also has a disadvantage: the development of osteoradionecrosis, a special form of osteomyelitis, in some patients (mainly in those cases where irradiation occurs after bone resection or after partial removal of the periosteum). Once the clinical picture of this irradiation complication has developed, its treatment is very difficult. A significant result or complete freedom from complaints can be attained only rarely. attention must therefore be focussed primarily on prevention, and the oral surgeon, the oncoradiologist and the patient too can all do much to help prevent the occurrence of osteoradionecrosis. Through coupling of an up-to-date, functional surgical attitude with knowledge relating to modern radiology and radiation physics, the way may be opened to forestall this complication that is so difficult to cure.
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keywords = neck
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6/96. Inserting a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube via a cervical fistula formed after major surgery on a patient with a head and neck tumor.

    SUMMARY: Several percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy techniques have been devised so far to provide enteral nutrition for patients with head and neck cancer, because no single technique is adequate for all. Anatomic and functional deficits caused by advanced tumor extension or by surgery or irradiation often hinder traditional peroral gastroscopy. Transnasal, laryngoscopically guided, or intraoperative gastroscopic procedures are useful technical methods for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement. This article introduces a new method of gastroscopy, as yet unpublished. After total laryngectomy and partial pharyngectomy, the remaining narrow hypopharyngeal lumen often is insufficient for peroral gastroscopy. However, coexisting cervical pharyngocutaneous fistula can provide an approach and route for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. The procedure was carried out successfully with no complications.
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ranking = 5
keywords = neck
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7/96. Complete branchial fistula. Case report and review of the literature.

    Branchial anomalies, a result of aberrant embryonic development, are rarely seen in clinical practice. Lesions of the second branchial pouch commonly present as a neck lump or discharging sinus that may be complicated by infection. Clinical examination often reveals the lesion to be related to the junction of the upper two thirds and the lower one third of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Branchial fistulas often present as a discharging sinus in the neck with the fistula tract extending upward within the deep neck tissue for a variable distance. A complete branchial fistula is one that has a defined internal opening in the tonsillar area and an external opening at the skin overlying the sternocleidomastoid muscle at the junction of the upper two thirds and the lower one third of the muscle. The incidence of such lesions is extremely rare. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for branchial anomalies. We present the case of a patient who presented with a complete branchial fistula and discuss the clinical presentation and surgical management of such lesions, with a review of the relevant literature.
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ranking = 3
keywords = neck
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8/96. Bilateral chylothorax after left radical neck dissection.

    Bilateral chylothorax, as a complication of neck dissection, is very rare as evidenced by the 11 cases reported in the literature up to date. We present an additional case of bilateral chylothorax following a left radical neck dissection and concomitant chylous neck fistula. This case was successfully treated by chest drainage and total parenteral nutrition. early diagnosis of chylothorax is urged due to the consequences on metabolism and respiratory conditions. Management by aspiration drainage is usually sufficient to control pleural effusions.
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ranking = 7
keywords = neck
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9/96. Acute suppurative thyroiditis caused by an infected piriform sinus fistula with thyrotoxicosis.

    We report herein an unusual case of thyrotoxicosis caused by acute suppurative thyroiditis (AST) infected through a piriform sinus fistula (PSF). A 28-year-old man presented with pain over the thyroid gland and elevated serum thyroid hormone levels, a picture similar to subacute thyroiditis. A fine-needle aspiration biopsy from the left lobe showed neutrophil infiltration, and culture from the aspirate grew anaerobic peptostreptococcus. A neck computed tomography (CT) scan showed an abscess in the thyroid gland, and barium swallow revealed the presence of PSF. Appropriate antibiotic treatment ameliorated his symptoms of infection, followed by normalization of thyroid function. Three months later, he underwent fistulectomy and partial left lobectomy. The end of the PSF track was found in the left thyroid lobe. Thus infection of the thyroid gland through the infected PSF was likely the cause of supprative thyroiditis. The unusual clinical features of AST in this patient include the presence of severe thyrotoxicosis, relatively late onset (28-years-old) of infection despite the presence of congenital PSF, and the lack of acute inflammatory signs on the overlying skin of the thyroid gland. It is important to recognize this type of AST, since fistulectomy is required to prevent recurrent AST.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neck
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10/96. Delayed carotid artery rupture in advanced cervical cancer--a dilemma in emergency management.

    Carotid artery rupture in the setting of advanced carcinoma of the head and neck constitutes a surgical emergency. This report details three such patients, two of whom presented with profuse bleeding, the other with imminent rupture. Notably, our first patient ruptured 27 years after having had radiotherapy for carcinoma of the larynx. This patient had had no previous surgery and at operation no recurrent tumor was evident. In the other two patients, previous surgery had demonstrated tumor invasion of the carotid artery. The choice of therapy in this calamitous condition is controversial, the question being whether to resect and reconstruct or ligate the ruptured artery. Our three patients underwent ligation with no recurrence of bleeding and no neurological sequelae for a follow-up period of 5-36 months. Of paramount importance is the hemodynamic stabilization of the patient prior to being submitted to surgery. Our results favor ligation rather than resection and reconstruction as the procedure of choice in this difficult predicament.
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keywords = neck
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