Cases reported "Fistula"

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1/204. Haemosuccus pancreaticus: a clinical challenge.

    BACKGROUND: Haemosuccus pancreaticus is a rare complication of pancreatitis. It is a diagnostic problem for even the most astute clinician and a challenge for the expert endoscopist. We report a 25-year-old male patient who had all the features usually seen in haemosuccus pancreaticus patients: recurrent obscure upper gastrointestinal bleeding, pancreatitis, pseudocyst formation, ductal disruption, fistula and pancreatic ascites. The patient was treated by subtotal pancreatectomy, splenectomy and drainage of the pseudocyst. Although pancreatic duct communication with the surrounding vasculature could not be ascertained, we strongly believe the patient had haemosuccus pancreaticus because, over a follow-up period of 3 years, the patient was not only ascites free, but did not experience any further upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We believe that in evaluating patients with recurrent obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, one should always remember that the pancreas is a part of the gastrointestinal tract and, like other organs, is prone to blood loss.
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ranking = 1
keywords = duct
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2/204. The use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor to promote wound healing in a neutropenic patient after head and neck surgery.

    BACKGROUND: neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction, in association with a variety of diseases, has been shown to play a role in poor wound healing. Wound breakdown with fistula formation in patients undergoing total laryngectomy results in significant morbidity and increased hospital stay. Although malnutrition, prior radiation, diabetes, and other diseases are recognized as factors predisposing patients with head and neck cancer to developing fistulas, neutrophil dysfunction should also be considered. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been used successfully to treat neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction. methods: This study was conducted as a case report. RESULTS: We present the first report of a neutropenic head and neck cancer patient with a persistent wound of 6 months' duration who showed dramatic improvement after treatment with G-CSF. CONCLUSION: We conclude that G-CSF may represent a useful adjunct in patients with persistent wound healing problems and neutropenia despite adequate treatment by conventional means. Further clinical experience with G-CSF in patients with delayed healing is indicated.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = duct
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3/204. Spontaneous closure of vesicouterine fistula. Account for effective hormonal treatment.

    OBJECTIVES: To analyze the incidence of spontaneous closure, or non-surgical resolution, of vesicouterine fistula and discuss the resultant implications for the management. methods: review of the literature supplemented by case report of a young woman with spontaneous healing of vesicouterine fistula. RESULTS: This is the 41st patient with spontaneous closure of vesicouterine fistula reported to date. Her clinical course was suggestive of endocrine involvement in the lesion's formation. Spontaneous healing was observed in 5% of 796 vesicouterine fistula cases. Induction of amenorrhea was effective in 8 (89%) of the 9 patients treated, a rate significantly higher (p < 0.001) than that observed without hormonal manipulation (4%). CONCLUSIONS: Conservative management by means of hormonal treatment should be considered before surgical repair. We suggest the role of estrogens and the endometrium in the formation of vesicouterine fistulas.
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keywords = duct
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4/204. Gallstone erosion of the aorta.

    A case of fatal erosion of the abdominal aorta by gallstones is reported. The patient presented with a six-day history of melaena and died suddenly 39 hours after admission to hospital, with massive blood loss per rectum. At post-mortem examination a saccular cavity containing gallstones was found at the lower end of the common bile duct. The cavity communicated in front with the duodenum and behind with the aorta. This case appears to be the first of its kind to be reported.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = duct
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5/204. Antegrade transcatheter closure of coronary artery fistulae using vascular occlusion devices.

    Two children (a 9 year old boy and a 2.5 year old girl) with coronary artery fistulae communicating with the right ventricle underwent successful transcatheter occlusion using an antegrade technique. A Rashkind double umbrella device was used in one case and an Amplatzer duct occluder in the other.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = duct
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6/204. Hypertensive pneumocephalus and nasal fistula in ventriculo-peritoneal shunt: case report and review of literature.

    A case of hypertensive endoventricular pneumocephalus associated with rhinoliquorrea raised after about 2 years from the application of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt for hydrocephalus by stenosis of aqueduct is presented. The causes of such complication and diagnostic possibilities to point out the fistula by CT and ventricular cisternography are to talk over. Even the indication of external CSF drainage or to the repairing treatment will be discussed. Finally, literature is reviewed.
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ranking = 2.2959928060691
keywords = aqueduct, duct
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7/204. Congenital pleuroperitoneal communication in a patient with pseudomyxoma peritonei.

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: pseudomyxoma peritonei syndrome is a rare disease arising from a perforated appendiceal adenoma. The syndrome is characterized by progressive accumulation of mucinous ascites and tumor within the peritoneal cavity. Direct extension of pseudomyxoma peritonei to the pleural cavity is uncommon and has been associated with surgical penetration of the diaphragm at the time of cytoreduction. methods: We review the case of a patient who presented with mucoid peritoneal and pleural fluid consistent with spontaneous pleural spread of pseudomyxoma peritonei. RESULTS: Surgical exploration confirmed direct pleuroperitoneal communication by macroscopic diaphragmatic fenestration. CONCLUSIONS: This is a rare phenomenon. We outline a therapeutic approach to be applied when pleural involvement is suspected in patients with pseudomyxoma peritonei syndrome.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = duct
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8/204. A case of barotrauma-induced pneumolabyrinth secondary to perilymphatic fistula.

    We report the case of a 62-year-old woman who experienced pneumolabyrinth associated with a perilymphatic fistula. Her condition was diagnosed with the help of computed tomography, which detected the presence of an air bubble in the labyrinth, and middle ear exploration, which revealed that clear fluid was emanating from the round window niche in a manner consistent with the presence of a perilymphatic fistula. The niche was repaired with tragal perichondrium and bolstered with Gelfoam.
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ranking = 17137.933976847
keywords = perilymphatic
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9/204. Traces of perilymph detected in epipharyngeal fluid: perilymphatic fistula as a cause of sudden hearing loss diagnosed with beta-trace protein (prostaglandin D synthase) immunoelectrophoresis.

    The incidence of perilymphatic fistula as cause of sudden hearing loss is not known. We present a case with sudden unilateral hearing loss associated with a positive beta-trace protein test of an epipharyngeal fluid sample. The patient presented with sudden sensorineural hearing loss on the right side. A stapedotomy had been performed nine months previously due to otosclerosis. Intravenous therapy for the treatment of sudden hearing loss was unsuccessful. At the time of sudden hearing loss, epipharyngeal fluid was collected using a Raucocel sinus pack. Investigation using rocket immunoelectrophoresis showed the presence of beta-trace protein. Upon repeating tympanoscopy there was no obvious labyrinthine fluid egress, but the oval window was sealed with fibrin sponge and fibrin glue. The patient's hearing improved over a period of five months.
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ranking = 14281.611647373
keywords = perilymphatic
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10/204. Traumatic perilymphatic fistulas in children: etiology, diagnosis and management.

    Post-traumatic perilymphatic fistulas have been described following ear and temporal bone injury, particularly in the setting of temporal bone fractures. However, indications for exploratory surgery in cases of trauma without temporal bone fracture are vague and not well described. We describe three children who presented with symptoms suggestive of perilymphatic fistula (PLF) without an associated temporal bone fracture: two with penetrating tympanic membrane injuries and one with blunt temporal bone trauma. All had symptoms of hearing loss and vestibular disturbance. Two of the children cooperated with ear-specific audiologic assessment, which demonstrated sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) on the traumatized side. The third child showed audiometric evidence of a SNHL on the injured side, but due to his age, the degree of severity of the SNHL was unable to be appropriately addressed prior to the patient being surgically managed. All three children underwent exploratory surgery and were found to have bony defects in the region of the oval window. All were repaired with fascial grafts to the oval and round windows with complete resolution of vestibular symptoms. However, two of the three patients with documented post-operative audiograms suffered from persistent SNHL on the injured side. We conclude that exploratory middle ear surgery is indicated in patients suffering from blunt or penetrating temporal bone or middle ear trauma who demonstrate persistent vestibular symptoms, sensorineural hearing loss or radiographic evidence of oval window pathology. As this is a limited number of patients, a larger series may be warranted to study the actual incidence of post-traumatic PLF in the child with persistent hearing loss and vertigo after head or ear trauma.
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ranking = 17137.933976847
keywords = perilymphatic
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