Cases reported "Focal Infection, Dental"

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1/57. Toxic shock syndrome secondary to a dental abscess.

    A 9-year-old girl presented with arthralgia and myalgia which progressed to developing renal failure and overwhelming septic shock. The underlying cause was assumed to be a periodontal abscess from an upper right deciduous canine tooth. The pus from the abscess grew a toxic shock syndrome toxin 1-producing staphylococcus aureus. This case illustrates the importance of an oral surgical review of patients presenting with features of toxic shock syndrome if the source of the infection is not immediately obvious.
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2/57. Chronic factitial ulcer of chin cured by endodontic (root-canal) surgery for underlying periapical abscess.

    In a determined search for the cause of a "factitial" ulcer of the jaw, consultation with 3 dentists was required before an underlying periapical abscess was discovered. Within 3 months of endodontic surgery, this ulcer of 12 years duration had completely healed and remains healed. Too often dental infection is neither suspected nor detected as a cause of skin disease.
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3/57. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis: report of a case.

    A 47-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for treatment of an odontogenic infection. He presented with a fever, signs of sepsis, and neck swelling, and was initially diagnosed as having a neck abscess. After cervical drainage, he showed no improvement, and mediastinitis was detected by chest X-ray and computed tomography. A thoracotomy and mediastinal drainage was subsequently performed for descending necrotizing mediastinitis, which resulted in marked improvement. To date, only 83 cases of descending necrotizing mediastinitis have been reported in japan. We present herein an additional case, followed by a review of the Japanese literature.
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4/57. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic origin: a case report and review of 12 cases.

    PURPOSE: This article reviews the demographics, presentation, cause, clinical findings, and treatment of 12 cases of cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic origin. patients AND methods: A retrospective chart review of 12 cases treated between 1987 and 1997 was done. RESULTS: Most cases resulted from an abscessed mandibular molar. The most common significant medical conditions in the patient's history were diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and substance abuse. All patients were treated surgically within 24 hours of admission. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) was used as adjunctive treatment in all cases. The average length of hospital stay was 31 days. All patients recovered. CONCLUSION: Early surgical intervention and the use of HBO decreases morbidity and improves the clinical outcome.
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5/57. Nasal fistula associated with dental infection: a report of a case.

    Most clinicians have come across a patient with difficult symptoms to diagnose. Often confusion occurs between odontogenic and nonodontogenic causes of sinus discomfort. On many occasions, sinus pain is due to purely dental causes, whereas in other situations dental pain is reported when the sinuses are infected. Due to the intimate association between the roots of the maxillary teeth and the floor of the nasal cavity and maxillary sinuses, diagnosis may be difficult. The following is a case report of a nasal fistula that developed from an abscessed maxillary central incisor.
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keywords = abscess
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6/57. Orbital infection arising from a primary tooth: a case report.

    Odontogenic infections may spread to the orbit by one or more of several paths. Such extension is potentially dangerous and may lead to loss of vision. A case of infection from a primary tooth, which extended to the retrobulbar area is presented in this report. Treatment included surgical drainage of the resulting subperiosteal orbital abscess through a Caldwell-Luc approach as well as aggressive antibiotic therapy. The importance of early suspicion of this entity and its potential sequelae are discussed.
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7/57. Are dental infections a cause of brain abscess? Case report and review of the literature.

    Dental pathology and/or treatment have been linked to a small number of brain abscesses as possible sources of infection. A further case is presented, in which a dental site is implicated. A review of the evidence was undertaken. A wide range of dental procedures had been implicated. In some cases the brain isolate was not of dental origin. In many, the diagnosis was one of exclusion. In order to confirm the role of odontogenic infection in the pathogenesis of brain abscess, modern sampling techniques should be used to precisely identify the isolates. The causal organism should be identified in both oral and cranial sites.
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8/57. Subdural empyema secondary to odontogenic masticator space abscess: detection by indium-111-labeled white cell scan.

    Subdural empyema (SDE) is an extremely rare but serious complication of dental infection. A case is presented in which dental infection was complicated by a masticator space abscess and eventually led to a SDE. This report illustrates a rare sequence of events leading to SDE and its serendipitous detection by indium-111-labeled leucocyte scan.
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keywords = abscess
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9/57. A rare complication of tooth abscess--ludwig's angina and mediastinitis.

    Deep neck infections are a rare but potentially fatal complication of pulpal abscess of the teeth. If an infection can progress rapidly from a toothache to a life-threatening infection, then it is critical that dentists be able to recognize the danger signs and identify the patients who are at risk. This article reviews a case of a seemingly innocuous toothache which rapidly progressed to ludwig's angina and mediastinitis, and discusses how to recognize and manage these life-threatening infections.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = abscess
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10/57. Odontogenic subperiosteal abscess of orbit: a case report.

    Subperiosteal abscess of orbit is an uncommon but serious complication of orbital infection. We report a case of a 78 year old gentleman who presented with bilateral periorbital oedema and proptosis. Computerised tomography of orbit revealed bilateral dilated superior ophthalmic veins. Bilateral carotid-cavernous fistula was initially suspected. Serial imaging showed an increasing bilateral subperiosteal lesion of the orbit. Fine needle aspiration confirmed subperiosteal abscess. A high level of awareness is necessary in diagnosing subperiosteal abscess.
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