Cases reported "Focal Infection, Dental"

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1/26. Postanginal septicaemia with external jugular venous thrombosis: case report.

    Postanginal septicaemia is a syndrome of anaerobic septicaemia, septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein, and metastatic infections, that follows a localized infection in the area drained by the large cervical veins. The syndrome was well-known and often fatal in the preantibiotic era. It is now rather rare, presumably as a result of the almost routine use of prophylactic antibiotics. The symptoms are classic, and it should be suspected in any case where septicaemia and metastatic lesions are preceded by a head and neck infection. We report a case that is typical, except that branches of the external jugular vein were thrombosed. To our knowledge this has not been reported previously.
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keywords = neck
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2/26. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis: report of a case.

    A 47-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for treatment of an odontogenic infection. He presented with a fever, signs of sepsis, and neck swelling, and was initially diagnosed as having a neck abscess. After cervical drainage, he showed no improvement, and mediastinitis was detected by chest X-ray and computed tomography. A thoracotomy and mediastinal drainage was subsequently performed for descending necrotizing mediastinitis, which resulted in marked improvement. To date, only 83 cases of descending necrotizing mediastinitis have been reported in japan. We present herein an additional case, followed by a review of the Japanese literature.
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keywords = neck
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3/26. A rare complication of tooth abscess--ludwig's angina and mediastinitis.

    Deep neck infections are a rare but potentially fatal complication of pulpal abscess of the teeth. If an infection can progress rapidly from a toothache to a life-threatening infection, then it is critical that dentists be able to recognize the danger signs and identify the patients who are at risk. This article reviews a case of a seemingly innocuous toothache which rapidly progressed to ludwig's angina and mediastinitis, and discusses how to recognize and manage these life-threatening infections.
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keywords = neck
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4/26. Staphylococcal submandibular lymphadentitis of childhood.

    The presentation of two patients with the condition is described. The difficulty of finding an underlying cause of the infection is discussed, and the importance of a history of recent head and neck infection emphasised. Recommendations are made for appropriate antibiotic therapy to cover Staphylococci as well as the more common Streptococci.
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keywords = neck
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5/26. Necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck: review of the literature and report of a case.

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly spreading, life-threatening, bacterial disease. mortality rates have been estimated to vary between 8.7% and 74%. mortality depends on many factors, one of which is early recognition. Necrotizing fasciitis of dental origin has a low prevalence and as such presents diagnostic challenges for the dentist. The literature is reviewed, and a case history is presented.
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keywords = neck
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6/26. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by dental infection: a retrospective analysis of 9 cases and a review of the literature.

    OBJECTIVES: Necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck is an uncommon, potentially fatal soft tissue infection characterized by extensive necrosis and gas formation in the subcutaneous tissue and fascia. The aims of this study were to describe the condition of this rare disease and to find factors affecting the mortality. STUDY DESIGN: Nine of our new cases and 125 reported cases in the English-language literature with necrotizing fasciitis of dental origin were reviewed. RESULTS: Two of our 9 patients had some form of systemic disease such as diabetes, cardiac insufficiency, renal failure, or cerebral infarction, whereas the other 7 had no particular general complications. A computed tomography examination was useful for detecting gas formation in the deep neck. All 9 patients underwent extensive debridement within 24 hours, and good results were obtained. In contrast, 24 of the 125 reviewed patients died despite therapy. Factors affecting the mortality were associated diseases such as diabetes or alcohol abuse, delay of surgery, and the complication mediastinitis. CONCLUSION: Necrotizing fasciitis is still a potentially fatal disease. Early and aggressive debridement may reduce mortality.
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keywords = neck
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7/26. Regarding three cases of descending necrotizing mediastinitis: spiral CT assessment.

    Descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM) is a rare and life-threatening complication of deep neck space infection which occurs when infection spreads from the deep spaces of the neck, propagating within the soft tissue into the mediastinal spaces. The disease has a high mortality rate due to frequent delay in diagnosis and treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is important in determining the level of infection, showing the presence and extension of fluid collections (with or without gas bubbles) and diffuse soft-tissue infiltration of the mediastinal fat, and indicating the best surgical approach and progress of treatment. Three cases of DNM evaluated with spiral CT from June 1999 to June 2001 are presented.
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keywords = neck
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8/26. How serious are oral infections?

    life-threatening conditions following dental infections have been rare since antibiotics were introduced into the world of medicine. However, infections spreading through the soft tissues of the head and neck are encountered occasionally and mortality is still reported as a result of sepsis or airway embarrassment. A case of ludwig's angina from odontogenic infection that progressed into mediastinitis and pericarditis is presented. The steps adopted in the management of this case highlight the significance of early recognition and diagnosis of the source of deep cervical infections, the importance of securing the airway, effecting surgical drainage and aggressive intravenous antibiotic therapy.
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keywords = neck
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9/26. Necrotizing fasciitis of the face: a rare but dangerous complication of dental infection.

    Necrotizing fasciitis of the face is extremely rare. However, dentists should be familiar with the presentation of this condition because of the suddenness of its onset, the rapidity of its spread, the resulting drastically disfiguring morbidity and the high rate of mortality associated with it. In this paper, we describe the presentation and treatment of a 57-year-old woman with necrotizing fasciitis of the face and neck due to dental causes and discuss factors in the management of this life-threatening condition.
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keywords = neck
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10/26. mediastinitis from odontogenic infection. A case report.

    We report a case of mediastinitis complicating a dental infection in a 40-year-old male. Despite drainage of the localised neck abscess and the administration of systemic antibiotics, his submandibular abscess extended to involve the pericardial and pleural cavities. drainage procedures and thoracotomies were required to treat the empyema and purulent pericarditis. Computed tomography was used to follow the progression of disease and assess the efficacy of treatment.
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keywords = neck
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