Cases reported "Focal Infection, Dental"

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1/23. Toxic shock syndrome secondary to a dental abscess.

    A 9-year-old girl presented with arthralgia and myalgia which progressed to developing renal failure and overwhelming septic shock. The underlying cause was assumed to be a periodontal abscess from an upper right deciduous canine tooth. The pus from the abscess grew a toxic shock syndrome toxin 1-producing staphylococcus aureus. This case illustrates the importance of an oral surgical review of patients presenting with features of toxic shock syndrome if the source of the infection is not immediately obvious.
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2/23. Management of mandibular fascial space infection of odontogenic origin.

    cellulitis is an acute, painful infection whose swelling is larger with diffuse borders. When palpated, early cellulitis can be very soft or doughfy; a severe cellulitis is almost always described as indurated or even as being "board-like". It can be innocuous in its early stages and extremely dangerous in its more advance, indurated, rapidly spreading stages. Randy, a 16 years old boy who thought that a regularly occurring toothache can advance into a life-threatening complication has a lot to be thankful for. The patient was referred to the pediatric dentistry Division by the E.R. doctors for further evaluation and management due to a swelling on the lower quadrant of his face. This was on the 8th day after he experienced the first pain on tooth no. 47.
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3/23. Orbital infection arising from a primary tooth: a case report.

    Odontogenic infections may spread to the orbit by one or more of several paths. Such extension is potentially dangerous and may lead to loss of vision. A case of infection from a primary tooth, which extended to the retrobulbar area is presented in this report. Treatment included surgical drainage of the resulting subperiosteal orbital abscess through a Caldwell-Luc approach as well as aggressive antibiotic therapy. The importance of early suspicion of this entity and its potential sequelae are discussed.
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4/23. A rare complication of tooth abscess--ludwig's angina and mediastinitis.

    Deep neck infections are a rare but potentially fatal complication of pulpal abscess of the teeth. If an infection can progress rapidly from a toothache to a life-threatening infection, then it is critical that dentists be able to recognize the danger signs and identify the patients who are at risk. This article reviews a case of a seemingly innocuous toothache which rapidly progressed to ludwig's angina and mediastinitis, and discusses how to recognize and manage these life-threatening infections.
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5/23. Septic pulmonary embolism associated with periodontal disease: reports of two cases and review of the literature.

    We report two cases of septic pulmonary embolism associated with periodontitis. Chest CT revealed multiple nodular shadows with features characteristic of septic pulmonary embolism in both patients. Both patients had toothache, fever, and chest pain, and showed findings of periodontitis at initial presentation. Antimicrobial agents combined with dental surgery were successful in treatment. While septic pulmonary embolism from the lesions of periodontitis appears to be rare, periodontitis remains important in the differential diagnosis of septic pulmonary embolism.
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6/23. erythema nodosum of dental origin.

    The association of erythema nodosum and dental infectious foci has rarely been described in the literature. This report concerns four women who developed erythema nodosum either following dental treatment associated with gingival bleeding or due to infectious dental foci. In these cases, tooth extraction, removal of dental deposits, interrupted pulp treatment, apical periodontitis, or a relicted root were identified as causes of the development of erythema nodosum. Upon admission to the hospital, these patients also presented fever and and a maximally elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). In all instances, surgical treatment of the dental foci and/or administration of antibiotics rapidly led to the regression of the erythema nodosum, as well as to the normalization of body temperature and ESR. The cases described indicate that antecedent dental treatment and the possible presence of infectious dental foci should be considered in the differential diagnosis of erythema nodosum when taking the patient's medical history. This approach may avoid unnecessary, possibly invasive diagnostic procedures and can lead to rapid improvement in the patient's clinical status.
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7/23. Endogenous group G streptococcus endophthalmitis following a dental procedure.

    PURPOSE: To report a case of bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis due to group G streptococcus after a dental procedure. methods: Case report of a 69-year-old woman who presented with pain, decreased vision, bilateral uveitis, and a unilateral hypopyon 1 week after treatment for an abscessed tooth. RESULTS: Bilateral endophthalmitis was diagnosed, and group G streptococcus was cultured from the vitreous samples. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of endogenous endophthalmitis following a dental procedure. Furthermore, it was due to group G streptococcus, which is a rare cause of this condition.
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8/23. Paediatric necrotizing fasciitis complicating third molar extraction: report of a case.

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon but well-described entity. In the paediatric population compromising risk factors are frequently absent. We describe the successful treatment of a case of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis in a healthy 14-year-old male following routine extraction of an uninfected wisdom tooth for orthodontic purposes.
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9/23. Intraorbital abscess: a rare complication after maxillary molar extraction.

    BACKGROUND: The orbit is prone to being affected by an odontogenous infection, owing to its anatomical proximity to the maxillary sinus. A possible reason for an ophthalmic manifestation of a dental abscess is extraction of an acutely inflamed tooth. CASE DESCRIPTION: The authors describe the treatment of a man who had painful swelling and redness in the area of his right eye after having a maxillary molar extracted a few days previous. A general dentist referred the patient to the clinic after he began to experience a progressive deterioration of vision of his right eye. Emergency surgical intervention prevented impending loss of vision, and subsequent healing was uneventful. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: To avoid serious complications, clinicians should not perform a tooth extraction when the patient is in the acute stage of a maxillary sinus infection. Appropriate diagnostic imaging and profound evaluation of the clinical state play major roles in managing the treatment of patients with inflammatory processes that involve the oral and paraoral regions.
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10/23. Orbital abscess: visual loss following extraction of a tooth--case report.

    OBJECTIVE: It is the purpose of this article to alert the general practitioner to the severe consequences that may result from a tooth extraction, including the loss of vision, despite the use of antibiotics. CONCLUSIONS: Early and aggressive treatment is critical in obstructing the spread of infection toward the orbits, the eyes, and eventually the brain.
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