Cases reported "Folliculitis"

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1/54. Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis in infancy: report of two new cases.

    Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis (EPF) is a cutaneous inflammatory follicular disorder of unknown etiology. The diagnosis is made on the basis of clinical and histopathologic features. We describe two patients who had recurrent episodes of pruritic follicular papular and pustular lesions on the face, extremities, and trunk. The eruptions lasted for 1 month with intermittent remissions. Laboratory tests disclosed no infectious or parasitic etiology in patient 2. In patient 1 we isolated methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus in a blood culture. He had sepsis with lung and liver involvement. EPF is a self-limited dermatosis. On occasion, skin lesions may become superinfected, resulting in localized pyoderma or rarely systemic infection (sepsis). Histologically both of our patients showed a moderate mixed inflammatory infiltrate with numerous eosinophils centered around hair follicles. Their lesions responded well to topical corticosteroids.
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2/54. micrococcus folliculitis in hiv-1 disease.

    Organisms with little pathogenic potential in immunocompetent hosts may produce disease in hiv-1 patients. We describe three hiv-1 patients in late disease who presented with pruritic papules with central ulceration over the face and arms. In all the patients the eruptions had been present for months, and the patients did not develop sepsis. biopsy specimens in all the patients showed large gram-positive cocci, forming tetrads. Colony morphology, catalase positivity and coagulase negativity, and resistance to nitrofurantoin were used to separate micrococci from staphylococci. micrococcus species are usually considered normal inhabitants of the skin; however, in patients with hiv-1 disease, micrococcus species can produce localized cutaneous infections.
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3/54. Disseminated cryptococcosis presenting as pseudofolliculitis in an AIDS patient.

    We report the case of a 42-year-old man with AIDS and an unusual presentation of disseminated cutaneous cryptococcosis. The eruption was characterized by excoriated papules of the upper body and was initially diagnosed as folliculitis. A pseudofollicular eruption is a rare presentation for disseminated cryptococcosis.
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4/54. Neonatal eosinophilic pustular folliculitis.

    Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis (EPF) of infancy is a rare disorder which may begin in the neonatal period and cause considerable parental anxiety. It must be distinguished from other causes of a pustular eruption in neonates, including infection and erythema toxicum neonatorum, and rare disorders such as transient neonatal pustular melanosis, infantile acropustulosis and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. skin smears and occasionally skin biopsy may be necessary to reach a diagnosis. We report a case of a Caucasian child with an unusually early onset of EPF in the first day of life. We wish to emphasize the importance of recognizing this self-limiting condition in order to prevent inappropriate antimicrobial treatment.
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5/54. Granulomatous folliculitis as a manifestation of post-herpetic isotopic response.

    We report a case of postherpetic granulomatous folliculitis in a 52-year-old female. The several cutaneous granulomatous eruptions following herpes zoster reported in the literature include annular, sarcoid and tuberculoid granuloma, granulomatous vasculitis and granulomatous folliculitis. The mechanism of granuloma formation is probably triggered by a delayed hypersensitivity response to the virus.
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6/54. Sterile suppurative folliculitis associated with acute myeloblastic leukaemia.

    A 20-year-old woman presented with a 4-month history of follicular papules distributed over the trunk and extremities. One month later, routine blood tests were abnormal, showing acute myeloblastic leukaemia (M1 in the French-American-British classification). skin biopsy demonstrated a dermal infiltrate of a large number of neutrophils with occasional eosinophils and histiocytes in the vicinity of the hair follicle remnants. Intermingled in the infiltrate were atypical cells that were morphologically and immunohistochemically identical to leukaemic myeloblasts. Cultures of the papules and special stains of the biopsy specimen were negative for bacteria and fungi. The follicular eruption improved promptly in response to chemotherapy for the leukaemia. We suggest that this case may represent a rare, follicular variant of neutrophilic dermatosis associated with myelogenous leukaemia.
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7/54. Infundibulofolliculitis of the neck.

    Disseminate and recurrent infundibulofolliculitis is an uncommon eruption that typically presents on the trunk and proximal extremities of young black men. A case of a young girl with infundibulofolliculitis limited to the neck is presented and reviewed, and a proposal for renaming it is considered.
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8/54. Pruritic eosinophilic papular eruption revealing HIV infection.

    Eosinophilic folliculitis (EF) is a rare follicular pruritic papular eruption observed in association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The diagnosis of eosinophilic folliculitis is based on the histologic findings consisting of a sterile inflammatory infiltrate rich in eosinophils involving hair follicles. EF in HIV patients is believed to be an immunoinflammatory response directed either at follicular or skin flora antigens in the late-stage of HIV infection. In this stage, immune response is characterized by a shift from a Th1- to a Th2-dominant cytokine profile and an increased secretion of interleukin-4 and interleukin-5, both known to promote eosinophilia. We describe a case of HIV-associated eosinophilic folliculitis in a 30-year-old black woman referred to us for a pruritic follicular eruption without any other clinical symptom related to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV infection presenting with EF has been rarely reported and its occurrence in women is also very rare.
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9/54. Granulomatous folliculitis at sites of herpes zoster scars: Wolf's isotopic response.

    Cutaneous eruptions described on herpes zoster scars are variable. We present a case of granulomatous folliculitis occurring 4 weeks after an episode of herpes zoster infection in a woman with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The pathogenesis of the lesions remains unclear. The viral genome was detected only in early lesions.
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10/54. Massive exophytic abscesses and fibrotic masses of the chin: a variant of the follicular occlusion triad.

    We present a patient with an extensive cluster of exophytic nodules that developed on his chin. These nodules consisted of abscesses and fibrotic areas. Lesion morphology, histology, and microbiology support a follicular occlusion triad entity. However, the distribution is striking and does not fit the entities described in the triad. We present the case to show that follicular occlusion was the inciting factor in our patient's eruption and to broaden our concept of clinical manifestations that can arise from this pathologic process.
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